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We left San Francisco on September 7th 2008 and are off to see the world in our Tayana 37 Pilot House cutter.
Southern California, Land of the Beach Boys and other Fantasies
John
12/31/1969

The waters in the lee of Point Conception are John's old stomping ground. He sailed is NorSea all over the area over about 15 years. So, this is familiar territory and life is easy.

We took a day to sail from Cojo anchorage to Willows anchorage on the south side of Santa Cruz island. This involved sailing diagonally across the shipping lanes in the Santa Barbara Channel which is probably the most dangerous boating activity in Southern California. The density of ships is greater near the port of LA but ,by the time the ships have get near LA, they have slowed down. Up in the Santa Barbara Channel the huge cargo and oil carriers zip by at 20 kts. They cant steer them if they arent moving pretty fast.

Fortunately technology has made this game of playing tag with the behemoths much easier than it was a few years ago. Our AIS (automatic identification system) receiver gave us the speed and course for all the ships in the channel and calculated the probability of a collision. It displays the ship's position and speed on our charting software so we can see where they are relative to us on a real-time basis. Needless to say, it they were going to pass within 2 or 3 miles of us we would give way and go behind them. Years ago we depended on seeing the ships and keeping an eye on their relative bearing to try and tell if we were on a collision course. Now we don't even have to be able to see them to take the appropriate action. I'll post a screen shot of our charting software with ships displayed in one of our photo galleries.

We ended up spending several days anchored peacefully at Willow anchorage. We had occasional visitors in the form of fishermen, during the day, but never had company in the anchorage overnight. We flipped our inflatable dingy in the surf as we tried to leave the beach and dunked our old outboard. We need to have it serviced and hope we can get a few more months out of it.

We needed to re provision and find a marina for later in the week when we were planning on picking up our friend Pat Dugan. We needed to know where we would be tied up so Pat could make arrangements to get from the airport to the marina. So we sailed over to Channel Islands Harbor so we could get cell phone coverage and find a marina.

Channel Islands Harbor is a snug pleasure boat harbor just west of the commercial port that services the boat that support the oil platforms in the channel. There are several marinas in the harbor but, since John had kept his previous boat in Channel Islands Marina, for a couple of years, that was the one we tried first.

We lucked out. Channel Islands Marina had recently rebuilt the entire marina and had a lot of empty slips so they were running a special deal where visiting boats could get a couple of nights for free. We stayed for one night and then returned to the islands until later in the week.

Being in a marina occasionally is nice. It lets you fill the water tank, wash the salt off the boat, bring the batteries up to full charge and run past a grocery store. But the boat is much more comfortable to live on at anchor. Its usually quieter, and, since the boat swings with its bow into the wind, the boat is better ventilated. We spent the week on the hook at the yellow bank anchorage at Santa Cruz Island.

During our brief stay in the marina we ran into a friend, Peter, who keeps his boat in the harbor and his wife gave us a ride to the grocery store.

When we got back in the marina, just before pat arrived, we took a day rent a car and make several provisioning runs including some new fishing gear, groceries, Pat's favorite Tecate beer, new wheels for the dingy (more about this later) and a new starting battery for the engine.

Our first "accident" of the trip occured while we were in the marina. I was expecting a call from Pat and as I headed up the dock with some laundry my Treo cell phone started ringing. Shawn saw it was Pat calling so he grabbed the phone and started running toward me on the dock. He did not realize that the phone was a loose fit in its leather case and as he turned a corner the phone slipped out of the case, skipped on the dock and landed in the water. He says it was still working as in started sinking and he could see Pat's name still displayed on the screen. We did not recover the phone so it is now "sleeping with the fishes'. No more Soprano's for Shawn for a while.

Since we are headed out of the country we were going to be turning off our cell phones anyway so it was really no big deal.

Pat arrived right on schedule and we took off for a night at smugglers before the crossing to Catalina. Before our departure Pat gave us a beautiful stainless steel gas grill. That evening we were able to feed with some beef off the grill.

The crossing to Catalina was uneventful and a little too calm. The entire passage takes about 11 hours but we were only able to sail for 3-4 hours. We needed to arrive before dark as we were picking up a mooring that had been arranged for us at the USC marine lab at Catalina. We got there in plenty of time, tied up in a rolly anchorage and called the Two Harbors shore boat to take us to dinner ashore.

We motored and sailed over to San Pedro the following day and dropped Pat at the Cabrillo Marina fuel dock so he could get back to the airport and fly home. We headed straight back to the island and were on the mooring before dark.

More about the USC marine lab in the next post.

Southern California, Land of the Beach Boys and other Fantasies
John
12/31/1969

The waters in the lee of Point Conception are John's old stomping ground. He sailed is NorSea all over the area over about 15 years. So, this is familiar territory and life is easy.

We took a day to sail from Cojo anchorage to Willows anchorage on the south side of Santa Cruz island. This involved sailing diagonally across the shipping lanes in the Santa Barbara Channel which is probably the most dangerous boating activity in Southern California. The density of ships is greater near the port of LA but ,by the time the ships have get near LA, they have slowed down. Up in the Santa Barbara Channel the huge cargo and oil carriers zip by at 20 kts. They cant steer them if they arent moving pretty fast.

Fortunately technology has made this game of playing tag with the behemoths much easier than it was a few years ago. Our AIS (automatic identification system) receiver gave us the speed and course for all the ships in the channel and calculated the probability of a collision. It displays the ship's position and speed on our charting software so we can see where they are relative to us on a real-time basis. Needless to say, it they were going to pass within 2 or 3 miles of us we would give way and go behind them. Years ago we depended on seeing the ships and keeping an eye on their relative bearing to try and tell if we were on a collision course. Now we don't even have to be able to see them to take the appropriate action. I'll post a screen shot of our charting software with ships displayed in one of our photo galleries.

We ended up spending several days anchored peacefully at Willow anchorage. We had occasional visitors in the form of fishermen, during the day, but never had company in the anchorage overnight. We flipped our inflatable dingy in the surf as we tried to leave the beach and dunked our old outboard. We need to have it serviced and hope we can get a few more months out of it.

We needed to re provision and find a marina for later in the week when we were planning on picking up our friend Pat Dugan. We needed to know where we would be tied up so Pat could make arrangements to get from the airport to the marina. So we sailed over to Channel Islands Harbor so we could get cell phone coverage and find a marina.

Channel Islands Harbor is a snug pleasure boat harbor just west of the commercial port that services the boat that support the oil platforms in the channel. There are several marinas in the harbor but, since John had kept his previous boat in Channel Islands Marina, for a couple of years, that was the one we tried first.

We lucked out. Channel Islands Marina had recently rebuilt the entire marina and had a lot of empty slips so they were running a special deal where visiting boats could get a couple of nights for free. We stayed for one night and then returned to the islands until later in the week.

Being in a marina occasionally is nice. It lets you fill the water tank, wash the salt off the boat, bring the batteries up to full charge and run past a grocery store. But the boat is much more comfortable to live on at anchor. Its usually quieter, and, since the boat swings with its bow into the wind, the boat is better ventilated. We spent the week on the hook at the yellow bank anchorage at Santa Cruz Island.

During our brief stay in the marina we ran into a friend, Peter, who keeps his boat in the harbor and his wife gave us a ride to the grocery store.

When we got back in the marina, just before pat arrived, we took a day rent a car and make several provisioning runs including some new fishing gear, groceries, Pat's favorite Tecate beer, new wheels for the dingy (more about this later) and a new starting battery for the engine.

Our first "accident" of the trip occured while we were in the marina. I was expecting a call from Pat and as I headed up the dock with some laundry my Treo cell phone started ringing. Shawn saw it was Pat calling so he grabbed the phone and started running toward me on the dock. He did not realize that the phone was a loose fit in its leather case and as he turned a corner the phone slipped out of the case, skipped on the dock and landed in the water. He says it was still working as in started sinking and he could see Pat's name still displayed on the screen. We did not recover the phone so it is now "sleeping with the fishes'. No more Soprano's for Shawn for a while.

Since we are headed out of the country we were going to be turning off our cell phones anyway so it was really no big deal.

Pat arrived right on schedule and we took off for a night at smugglers before the crossing to Catalina. Before our departure Pat gave us a beautiful stainless steel gas grill. That evening we were able to feed with some beef off the grill.

The crossing to Catalina was uneventful and a little too calm. The entire passage takes about 11 hours but we were only able to sail for 3-4 hours. We needed to arrive before dark as we were picking up a mooring that had been arranged for us at the USC marine lab at Catalina. We got there in plenty of time, tied up in a rolly anchorage and called the Two Harbors shore boat to take us to dinner ashore.

We motored and sailed over to San Pedro the following day and dropped Pat at the Cabrillo Marina fuel dock so he could get back to the airport and fly home. We headed straight back to the island and were on the mooring before dark.

More about the USC marine lab in the next post.

Southern California, Land of the Beach Boys and other Fantasies
John
12/31/1969

The waters in the lee of Point Conception are John's old stomping ground. He sailed is NorSea all over the area over about 15 years. So, this is familiar territory and life is easy.

We took a day to sail from Cojo anchorage to Willows anchorage on the south side of Santa Cruz island. This involved sailing diagonally across the shipping lanes in the Santa Barbara Channel which is probably the most dangerous boating activity in Southern California. The density of ships is greater near the port of LA but ,by the time the ships have get near LA, they have slowed down. Up in the Santa Barbara Channel the huge cargo and oil carriers zip by at 20 kts. They cant steer them if they arent moving pretty fast.

Fortunately technology has made this game of playing tag with the behemoths much easier than it was a few years ago. Our AIS (automatic identification system) receiver gave us the speed and course for all the ships in the channel and calculated the probability of a collision. It displays the ship's position and speed on our charting software so we can see where they are relative to us on a real-time basis. Needless to say, it they were going to pass within 2 or 3 miles of us we would give way and go behind them. Years ago we depended on seeing the ships and keeping an eye on their relative bearing to try and tell if we were on a collision course. Now we don't even have to be able to see them to take the appropriate action. I'll post a screen shot of our charting software with ships displayed in one of our photo galleries.

We ended up spending several days anchored peacefully at Willow anchorage. We had occasional visitors in the form of fishermen, during the day, but never had company in the anchorage overnight. We flipped our inflatable dingy in the surf as we tried to leave the beach and dunked our old outboard. We need to have it serviced and hope we can get a few more months out of it.

We needed to re provision and find a marina for later in the week when we were planning on picking up our friend Pat Dugan. We needed to know where we would be tied up so Pat could make arrangements to get from the airport to the marina. So we sailed over to Channel Islands Harbor so we could get cell phone coverage and find a marina.

Channel Islands Harbor is a snug pleasure boat harbor just west of the commercial port that services the boat that support the oil platforms in the channel. There are several marinas in the harbor but, since John had kept his previous boat in Channel Islands Marina, for a couple of years, that was the one we tried first.

We lucked out. Channel Islands Marina had recently rebuilt the entire marina and had a lot of empty slips so they were running a special deal where visiting boats could get a couple of nights for free. We stayed for one night and then returned to the islands until later in the week.

Being in a marina occasionally is nice. It lets you fill the water tank, wash the salt off the boat, bring the batteries up to full charge and run past a grocery store. But the boat is much more comfortable to live on at anchor. Its usually quieter, and, since the boat swings with its bow into the wind, the boat is better ventilated. We spent the week on the hook at the yellow bank anchorage at Santa Cruz Island.

During our brief stay in the marina we ran into a friend, Peter, who keeps his boat in the harbor and his wife gave us a ride to the grocery store.

When we got back in the marina, just before pat arrived, we took a day rent a car and make several provisioning runs including some new fishing gear, groceries, Pat's favorite Tecate beer, new wheels for the dingy (more about this later) and a new starting battery for the engine.

Our first "accident" of the trip occured while we were in the marina. I was expecting a call from Pat and as I headed up the dock with some laundry my Treo cell phone started ringing. Shawn saw it was Pat calling so he grabbed the phone and started running toward me on the dock. He did not realize that the phone was a loose fit in its leather case and as he turned a corner the phone slipped out of the case, skipped on the dock and landed in the water. He says it was still working as in started sinking and he could see Pat's name still displayed on the screen. We did not recover the phone so it is now "sleeping with the fishes'. No more Soprano's for Shawn for a while.

Since we are headed out of the country we were going to be turning off our cell phones anyway so it was really no big deal.

Pat arrived right on schedule and we took off for a night at smugglers before the crossing to Catalina. Before our departure Pat gave us a beautiful stainless steel gas grill. That evening we were able to feed with some beef off the grill.

The crossing to Catalina was uneventful and a little too calm. The entire passage takes about 11 hours but we were only able to sail for 3-4 hours. We needed to arrive before dark as we were picking up a mooring that had been arranged for us at the USC marine lab at Catalina. We got there in plenty of time, tied up in a rolly anchorage and called the Two Harbors shore boat to take us to dinner ashore.

We motored and sailed over to San Pedro the following day and dropped Pat at the Cabrillo Marina fuel dock so he could get back to the airport and fly home. We headed straight back to the island and were on the mooring before dark.

More about the USC marine lab in the next post.

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