s/v Barefoot

Lavranos 43

10 September 2016 | New Caledonia
11 February 2016 | Tasmania, Australia
07 February 2016 | Bass Strait, Tasmania
24 December 2015 | South Stradbroke Island, Gold Coast, Queensland
06 October 2015 | Whitsunday Islands
25 September 2015 | Cape Gloucester, North Queensland
10 September 2015 | Cid Harbour, Whitsunday Islands
28 August 2015 | Mackay, North Queensland
16 August 2015 | Great Barrier Reef, Queensland
28 June 2015 | Jacob's Well, Main Channel, Gold Coast, Queensland
16 June 2015 | Cronulla, Port Hacking, NSW, Australia
13 June 2015 | Port Hacking, NSW, Australia
11 June 2015 | Huskisson, Jervis Bay, NSW, Australia
08 June 2015 | Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Au
18 May 2015 | Eden, NSW, Australia
17 May 2015 | Bass Strait
12 September 2014 | Hobart, Tasmania
08 June 2014 | Recherche Bay, Tasmania
01 June 2014 | Port Davey
03 March 2014 | Tasmania

Note to Self on Passage Matters

13 May 2013 | East Cape, NZ
David
We sailors have notably short memories of unpleasant events at sea. That explains why when queried about a passage several days after completion the usual answer is "uneventful". It also explains why we go out to sea again. Whether the "short memory" condition is a result of the amount of alcohol consumed by a dry sailor promptly after dropping anchor (attempting to erase portions of the passage, no doubt) is a subject for another time. Having not yet dropped anchor on this passage, I'm still lucid and think it prudent to make notes to myself concerning a decision that in retrospect could have been better. As I write, we are northwest of East Cape, NZ and the seas have settled down to 3 meters and the wind down to 30 to 35 knots-both from the port quarter (150 to 160 degrees); life is better. The main is triple reefed (unfortunately the bunt is not tied). We're making 7 or so knots; the boat is pitching, rolling and occasionally slammed hard by an overtaking wave. Earlier, of necessity because of the larger seas and much higher winds, we were sailing dead downwind and square to the seas, but now we tolerate the roll and slam in order to lay our course. Writing this, the computer feet grip the nav desk well, but the mouse and cursor are on the loose and my butt rocks back and forth in the nav seat.

This passage is from Picton, South Island to Great Barrier Is. North Island, NZ., about 660 sailing miles. In Picton, we watched weather forecasts for 10 days looking for a window of southerly winds to sail north to East Cape (a notorious, "capey" rounding) and easterlies at the Cape to sail west toward Auckland. Our weather information came from grib files and NZ met service marine broadcasts. There are few intermediate anchorages so we sought a weather system that would cover the 5 day passage; it finally developed. Sailing out of Picton via Tory Channel, past Wellington and out Cook Strait require "going with the flow" which means hurrying or pausing along the way for the proper tidal current. Our weather window consisted of 18 hours of northerlies (10 to 15 knots)(means sailing to windward); painful. The wind at East Cape (a major issue) would be light (15 knot) southerlies; perfect. Rounding East Cape and heading west 25 knot south easterlies were forecasted; excellent, that would wind up the final 200 miles quickly.

The passage was as planned up to and around East Cape (the day of northerlies was a "hang-on-baby" slog). But, oops, rounding East Cape at 10 PM, the southeasterly 25 knots on the grib and 35 knots predicted by the NZ met service climbed in less than half an hour to 45 and 50 with gusts to 55. One reef in the main served well until the sudden increase which I took to be temporary and attributable to the proximity of the Cape. Not so; the winds held in that range and a corresponding sea built for the next 15 hours. We hove-to with a triple reef after exceeding the speed limit with one reef much too long. The met service began reporting 40 knots 12 hours later. Now comes the "try to remember for next time part": I should have "sailed the wind we had" and tucked in a second and third reef immediately as the wind built instead of anticipating it would ease once clear of the Cape. Now, at anchor, as I dispatch this two days later, the sun is shinning, the sea is calm and, thinking back, the passage was "uneventful". We'll go to sea again next month bound north to Wallis Island and Tuvalu.

(See Photo Album: 'The last leg around NZ')
Comments
Vessel Name: Barefoot
Vessel Make/Model: Lavranos 43
Hailing Port: Friday Harbor, Washington
Crew: David and Roslyn
About: Barefoot is a 13 meter Angelo Lavranos design built in aluminum by Dearden Marine in Gibsons, British Columbia, Canada. David is from Seattle, Washington, USA and Roslyn is from Darwin, Australia.
Barefoot's Photos - Main
Winter in Tasmania has been a different experience for the Barefoot crew.
3 Photos
Created 12 September 2014
Port Davey and Bathurst Harbour are in a World Heritage Wilderness area at the remote SW corner of Tasmania. We were fortunate to have a week of sunny winter weather there.
29 Photos
Created 16 June 2014
Recherche Bay is surrounded by National Park forest near the SE corner of Tasmania. This isolated bay is a shelter for local crayfishing boats and where yachts wait for weather to sail around to the south and west coasts of Tasmania.
7 Photos
Created 26 May 2014
We explored the east coast north of Freycinet Peninsula by road. There are few good anchorages in the area and we were ready for a road trip. This area is known for its fine white beaches and granite rocks coloured orange from lichen growing above the high tide line.
9 Photos
Created 26 May 2014
Port Macquarie and the town of Strahan is about mid-way on the west coast of Tasmania. We intend to sail there, but not in winter. Ready to leave the boat at a dock in Hobart for a few days, we drove across Tasmania to Port Macquarie.
11 Photos
Created 26 May 2014
Barefoot arrived in Tassie at the Freycinet Peninsula on the east coast. We spent a couple of weeks exploring the beautiful anchorages, beaches and walks in the area.
15 Photos
Created 14 May 2014
The port of Eden in Twofold Bay is the most southerly port in NSW. It was a beautiful spot to spend a couple of days, waiting for our weather window to sail to Tasmania.
5 Photos
Created 14 May 2014
The couple of weeks we spent anchored in Sydney Harbor in February was big city excitement. Anchoring in the heart of a city was reminiscent of San Francisco.
6 Photos
Created 13 May 2014
In our month in New Cal we managed to see Noumea and some of the south and SW of the main island, and Amedee Is.
8 Photos
Created 14 January 2014
Our land trip across NSW to Adelaide, South Australia, and back along the south Coast of SA, Victoria and SE NSW.
25 Photos
Created 9 January 2014
After a rather uncomfortable passage, Barefoot broke her voyage from New Zealand to Wallis Island, by revisiting Tonga. First port was Nuku'alofa, the capital of Tonga; then on to Vava'u.
29 Photos
Created 14 October 2013
Wallis is a small French island, part of the country of Wallis & Futuna, north of Fiji. The Barefoot crew enjoyed 3 weeks exploring this beautiful Island.
29 Photos
Created 14 October 2013
Barefoot and crew thoroughly enjoyed a month at Funafuti, Tuvalu (formerly Ellis Is) - 8degS
66 Photos
Created 14 October 2013
With a wild weather forecast, we gave up 'weather watching' to sail north, and instead drove south to soak in the hot water of the thermal region of Rotorua. We returned via Tauranga and Mt Maunganui.
12 Photos
Created 20 June 2013
Barefoot set sail from Marsden Cove on 14 Feb '13, harbour hopping north to the Bay of Islands, and Whangaroa, then a 6-day passage around North Cape and Cape Reinga, down the west coast to the South Island. Destination: Nelson and the Marlborough Sounds
17 Photos
Created 12 June 2013
The last leg of our NZ circumnavigation took us from Cook Strait, north up the east coast of the Nth Is, around East Cape to Great Barrier Island, then back to Marsden Cove. East Cape lived up to its name and gave us a rather rough time; Great Barrier Island was beautiful and we enjoyed glorious calm, blue weather for the last 3 days of the trip.
13 Photos
Created 12 June 2013
From Dunedin Barefoot continued north up the east coast of the Sth Is, direct to Queen Charlotte Sound, via Cook Strait and the Tory Channel. We moored in Cockle Cove, a peaceful and picturesque little bay in Queen Charlotte Sound for a few days R&R before hitting the heights of Picton.
18 Photos
Created 12 June 2013
From Doubtful Sound we had a rather rough, very fast sail down to Breaksea Sound, with wind and swell behind us. Breaksea Sound and Broughton Arm off it, were spectacular. We were then able to pass through Acheron Passage from Breaksea Sound to Dusky Sound.
14 Photos
Created 5 June 2013
Captain Cook visited Dusky Sound in the Resolution in 1773. We anchored in Pickersgill Harbour where he anchored the Resolution for a month, at the same time of year.
20 Photos
Created 5 June 2013
Sailing south in Fjordland from George Sound, Barefoot next visited Thompson Sound, which led us into Doubtful Sound. Doubtful Sound was named by Capt Cook when he didn't enter it, doubting that it was actually a sound. Looking at the winding entry from the sea, this is understandable.
12 Photos
Created 2 June 2013
Crossing Cook Strait was magical, glassy calm, despite it's fearsome reputation. Nelson was our first stop on the South Island. It was here the local sailors convinced us to continue sailing south, to Fjordland.
8 Photos
Created 1 June 2013
From Stewart Is Barefoot sailed north to Otago Harbour and the university city of Dunedin.
18 Photos
Created 5 May 2013
This album covers our cruise from Puysegur Pt on the SW corner of the Sth Island, past the Solander islands, around the south coast of Stewart Island and into Pt Pegasus; then north up the east coast of the island to Oban.
30 Photos
Created 5 May 2013
Sailing south from Milford Sound, we next visited George Sound.
15 Photos
Created 5 May 2013
Milford Sound is the most well known and the most northerly sound in Fjordland on the SW of the South Island of NZ. This is the only Sound with easy road access and therefore popular with tourists. The famous Milford Track is a testing 5-day 'tramp' into the Sound. It was our first stop, 5 days after sailing out of Nelson.
29 Photos
Created 5 May 2013
Barefoot spent a month cruising to some of the many islands in the Vava'u Group. The highlight of our Tongan experience would have to be swimming with a Humpback whale and her calf.
24 Photos
Created 17 December 2012
From Samoa we first visited Niuataputapu Island in Tonga's northern island group, the Niuas. Unfortunately, the impact of a tsunami 3 years prior was still very evident.
20 Photos
Created 17 December 2012
Arriving in New Zealand. End of the 14 month, 12,000Nm voyage from Seattle.
10 Photos
Created 17 December 2012
Robert Louis Stevenson's home in Samoa, Villa Vailima, and his last resting place.
7 Photos
Created 31 October 2012
We hope these photos convey something of a wonderful visit to this remote atoll in the Northern Cook Islands.
19 Photos
Created 29 October 2012
Coco has a worried look
6 Photos
Created 3 September 2012
Barefoot's 'vacation' at Bora Bora; renown as one of the most beautiful islands in the South Pacific. Society islands, French Polynesia. August 2012
12 Photos
Created 29 August 2012
Barefoot's cruise around Tahaa island, which lies immediately north of, and within the same barrier reef as Raiatea. Society Islands, French Polynesia. August 2012
13 Photos
Created 29 August 2012
Barefoot's visit to Raiatea in the Society Islands, French Polynesia. August 2012
4 Photos
Created 29 August 2012