Colin& Sukie's year out!

Vessel Name: Betsy
11 February 2017
23 April 2016
04 April 2016
30 March 2016
09 March 2016 | Portsmouth, Dominica
07 March 2016
26 February 2016
15 February 2016
13 January 2016
22 December 2015
15 December 2015
13 December 2015
Recent Blog Posts
20 March 2017

Torrential rain/mountain whistler/Diving/Antigua

While in Dominica we took a hike with Seacat to Middleham falls. There had been too much rain to swim in the pool, nevertheless it was very impressive cascading over 75'. Seacat (whose other name is Octavius) whistled for the Mountain whistler bird and within seconds two had flown to the trees above us! Apparently they have seven different songs all of them thin and haunting. One of the joys of Dominica are the very friendly people who live there. They are justily proud of their stunning island . We particularly enjoyed the local bread called 'bakes' which are either plain or filled with fish. The famous Sukie's bread/gas/oil that is everywhere we later learnt, is run by a man called Sukie!!!We decided to cement our diving experience by doing two dives in Soufriere marine park. No one is allowed to anchor in this giant underwater volcanic creater. Consequently the marine life and corals are absolutely stunning. That was the last of the good weather and clear water, as for the next 3 days the wind howled and the rain fell so hard the sea went flat. We had to put out 55 meters of chain with a huge weight called an angel that we slipped down the anchor chain as well. After the howling winds and rain abated we looked across the bay only to notice that the large listing fishing boat had sunk in the middle of the bay! Our passage from Portsmouth Dominica to Deshaies in the north of Guadeloupe was the wettest we had experienced since sailing in Scotland. Both of us even felt a little cold! We decided to go to the small marina on the south wesr of Guadeloupe only to find that as it was saturday afternoon it was effectively shut! The French enjoy their weekends. However we berthed momentarily beside a Dutch yacht called Grutte Grize. We left and half an hour later they called us on the VHF to say they were friends of the couple on the yacht Bojangles. It was lovely to have Rob and Baudine's good wishes passed on to us via Grutte Grize. Bojangles was awaiting a new mast in Trinidad having lost theirs in the Atlantic crossing. We had met them more than 2 years ago while doing our SSB training in the Isle of Wight. We had a fantastic crossing up to English harbour in Antigua and were met and escorted to a anchorage by Elwyn from Ishtar! English harbour is very similar to the docks in Bristol without the superyachts. One was for sale for £54 million! I wonder why it was not £51 or £52 million? We went to a very jolly BBQ on the beach and fell into bed exhausted. After fueling up we re anchored closer into the beach wherethe boats 'dance'. Because of the eddys of the tide, the yachts are one minute far away from eachother and the next minute touchng! Elwyn and Mo advised us to put out fenders around Betsy. What was amazing is when we brought the anchor up the chain had actually twisted in on itself during the 'dancing' and had to be unfurled. We jib sailed between the reefs and the island up to Jolly harbour marina where we are having four small windows rebedded as they had begun to leak. From here we here we head north to islands we have not visited which will be exciting.

24 February 2017

Diving, phosphorescence and the Barbers

Before leaving Grenada we had a lovely meal at he Coyaba Hotel on Grande Anse Beach, where over 13 years ago we had stayed for our honeymoon! While we were still in Prickly Bay Grenada Colin decided it was time for a hair cut so sought out the local Barbers. The shop was run by two friendly Rastafarians with dreadlocks down to their knees. It seemed strange however, that as a Rastafarian you do not cut your hair on religious grounds and here they both were cutting mens' hair for their living! However, it was a very fine haircut. It was 30 EC (Caribbean dollars) which is about £8.00 nearly as cheap as a haircut in Moffat! In order to finish our Padi Open Water dive certificate we had to do a lot of practising in the shallows, taking our masks off and on, using alternative air amongst other things. On our fist dive we saw a huge Atlantic Trigger fish - amazing and a huge Grouper amongst a myriad of sea creatures and corals totally breath taking. After passing various tests and dive planning exercises we have now gained our certificates. I swam after dark one evening and the phosphorescence was like swimming through dancing diamonds at every stroke. Colin also saw the 'green flash' which in the Caribbean you are meant to see just after the sun sinks below the sea at the horizon when the sky is clear. We leave for St Lucia tomorrow, we will both be sad to leave such amazing dive sites.

11 February 2017

Trinidad-Grenada-Grenadines

Well we arrived back in Power Boats in Chagaramus Trinidad to see lovely Betsy with a very shiny hull. It took us 5 days to re stow all our belonging from the store there. We had taken everything off Betsy last May so she could be fumigated as found Palmetto Coakroaches! Only 4 but they are particularly large and scuttling! We had ordered a new bimini (suncover for the person at the wheel) which was excellent and high enough so Colin did not need to bend his head. Trinidad was very very hot and humid. Huge rain clouds formed and the ground became awash with water. Colin dripped continually so ended up having a small towel around his neck. Obviously I glowed attractively! It was a joy to finally be in the water again and feel Betsy move. We headed north into the night towards Grenada, passing east of the gas fields just north of Trinidad. We had a fantastic sail broad reaching with hydrovane through the night. We approached Prickly Bay in the south west of Grenada shortly after dawn. We had two days to prepare Betsy for our friends John and Sue Head. The first full day we sailed round to the leeward coast and found a beautiful anchorage at Halifax Bay just north of the capital St Georges. We had a bouncy run up to Carriacou. Sue did not feel unwell at all, even though it was fairly rough at times thanks to her new scopoderm patches. We headed up to the Grenadines and Chatham Bay in Union Island. We had a traditional Caribbean meal of fish, chicken, lentils plantain rice and vegetables. Our ferryman a chap called Obama (not the ex president) helped us ashore. The winds at the end and beginning of the year are called 'Christmas winds'. They are strong and from north of east. However, we managed to have a lovely sail from Union up to Bequai where we spent 2 nights. Turning south again, we had a blustery night at anchor in Cannoun. The winds were shrieking down the steep hillsides so we had an uncomfortable night. As the wind was too strong for the Tobago Cays we anchored in Salt Whistle Bay on the island of Mayreau. This was an idyllic anchorage a horseshoe of silver sand edged with coconut trees! A short sail to Petite Martinque for the night then a wonderful fast downwind sail to Carriaour and then onto Grenada where we berthed at Port Louis marina in St Georges. We had a very good 10 days with the Heads. Lots of great sailing and fun and games. Sue definitely found her sea legs and enjoyed it! As well as being a fabbie cook in the galley she managed to make a meal for 4 people from a very small and expensive red snapper! It was great having John with all his experience, helping with anchoring, splicing etc. We are now in Prickly Bay, the sail down from St Georges had Betsy going nearly 9knots, just with a reefed yankee! We had an updated windmill fitted as the old one ceased to work. We came to Grenada for our honeymoon over 13 years ago, so it is a special place for us. February 7th is Independence Day here in Grenada so, there were lots of steel bands and many of the houses were decorated in the colours of the Grenadian flag. We will be staying until the end of next week when we will head up to Carriacou to finish our Padi Open Dive certificate!

12 May 2016

Last Blog-Diving and Turtles & Betsy hauled out!

We stayed in Chatham Bay, Union Island for a few days before making our way down to Tyrell Bay in Carriacou. While we were in Chatham Bay the winds were strong one night and the dinghy turned over with the little outboard on it. So that was the end of it, thank goodness! It had worked at best only [...]

23 April 2016

Heading south!

We left beautiful Barbuda bound for Jolly Harbour, Antigua. There we met Elwyn from Ishtar who invited us to join him and Mo at the Royal Navy 'Tot' club of Antigua and Barbuda. We had a fantastic sail round to Falmouth Harbour. Unfortunately we got a bit caught up in on of the 'Oyster Regatta Races' (see photo) and had to alter course on several occasions! Betsy was no match for these racing giants. The 'Tot' club was thoroughly entertaining and suffice to say that after the large 'tot' of Rum the very memorable evening then became, less memorable and rather blurred and fuzzy. We had a very jolly evening aboard Ishtar the following day, meeting other folk from Cornwall. We met up with John and Chris on their Bowman40 Oriel for tea and cake. They have been out in the Caribbean for many years and were very generous in sharing their experiences. After having an enjoyable evening with Simon and Jenny from Fenecia (who we met in Porto Santo all those months ago) we left the socializing of Antigua and headed south. Next year we may stay for classics week. We anchored briefly at Pigeon Island Guadeloupe, then had a very wet sail down to Dominica. The rain fell so heavily from the skies the mountains were obscured. As we went below soaked through, it reminded us of many of our summer holidays sailing in Scotland! Luckily the following day dawned bright and sunny. A walk in the forests to find parrots was the quest with our guide Winston. Suffice to say after a lovely cool walk in the forest we saw briefly a pair of parrots flying away from us. We did however, hear them squawking. The Customs and Immigration in Dominica has to be the easiest and most yacht friendly of all the island countries. we have visited. You check in and out at the same as long as you do not spend more than 2 weeks. On our way south we picked up a mooring at Seacat's Pier and arranged a tour with him the following day. His real name is Octavious Lugay and he is a very experienced trekker and guide (see photo). We had a wonderful day eating the best little bananas ever, cassava bread smoked chicken from on of his chums kitchen a chocolate factory ending up with a cool dip in the Emerald Pool with the sound of the mountain whistler bird surrounding us. It was with a heavy heart we left stunning Dominica. The huge mountain outline of the island stayed with us as we reached Martinique and St Pierre. A quick overnight stop before setting off at first light for Rodney Bay in St Lucia. There we watered up and bought a few stores for the last few weeks on Betsy. Unfortunately there had been a violent incident in Wallilibou a few weeks ago so. we reluctantly decided to skip St Vincent. We had previously had a find time meeting up with Rosi and Orlando along with Curtis in Kearton Bay beside Wallilibou. So, from Rodney Bay we sailed then motored the d63 nm to Bequia. the weather here has become decidedly hotter as Summer appears. Apparently Trinida is even hotter! We cannot believe it is now less then 3 weeks before we will be flying back to the UK and our year out will be over!

04 April 2016

Barbuda

What a stunning and unspoilt island, long may it continue! It reminds us of Islay or Harris in the west highlands when the sun shines. Stunning light unspoilt beaches, landscape not dominated by man. No resorts or gated hotel complexes. Very friendly and independant people. We went to th frigate bird colony. This is one the largest in the world with over 20,0000 birds. They are famous for the males inflating their bright red chests at mating season. (see photos if you can!) The bay we are anchored in is called Low Bay on the west side of the island and has a 10 Km sandy beach! The people here are very independent and when a large development was planned the Barbudans went and together pushed their offices into the sea. They are also strongly opposing a plan by Robert Dinero and his rich chums to develop another site. They are trying to get round the fact that there is no land ownership in Barbuda! This makes it a really inique island with its own spirit. We hired bikes with Larry and Manice from Tern and went for a great bike ride to the east side of the island seeing wild donkeys on our way.

Torrential rain/mountain whistler/Diving/Antigua

20 March 2017
While in Dominica we took a hike with Seacat to Middleham falls. There had been too much rain to swim in the pool, nevertheless it was very impressive cascading over 75'. Seacat (whose other name is Octavius) whistled for the Mountain whistler bird and within seconds two had flown to the trees above us! Apparently they have seven different songs all of them thin and haunting. One of the joys of Dominica are the very friendly people who live there. They are justily proud of their stunning island . We particularly enjoyed the local bread called 'bakes' which are either plain or filled with fish. The famous Sukie's bread/gas/oil that is everywhere we later learnt, is run by a man called Sukie!!!We decided to cement our diving experience by doing two dives in Soufriere marine park. No one is allowed to anchor in this giant underwater volcanic creater. Consequently the marine life and corals are absolutely stunning. That was the last of the good weather and clear water, as for the next 3 days the wind howled and the rain fell so hard the sea went flat. We had to put out 55 meters of chain with a huge weight called an angel that we slipped down the anchor chain as well. After the howling winds and rain abated we looked across the bay only to notice that the large listing fishing boat had sunk in the middle of the bay! Our passage from Portsmouth Dominica to Deshaies in the north of Guadeloupe was the wettest we had experienced since sailing in Scotland. Both of us even felt a little cold! We decided to go to the small marina on the south wesr of Guadeloupe only to find that as it was saturday afternoon it was effectively shut! The French enjoy their weekends. However we berthed momentarily beside a Dutch yacht called Grutte Grize. We left and half an hour later they called us on the VHF to say they were friends of the couple on the yacht Bojangles. It was lovely to have Rob and Baudine's good wishes passed on to us via Grutte Grize. Bojangles was awaiting a new mast in Trinidad having lost theirs in the Atlantic crossing. We had met them more than 2 years ago while doing our SSB training in the Isle of Wight. We had a fantastic crossing up to English harbour in Antigua and were met and escorted to a anchorage by Elwyn from Ishtar! English harbour is very similar to the docks in Bristol without the superyachts. One was for sale for £54 million! I wonder why it was not £51 or £52 million? We went to a very jolly BBQ on the beach and fell into bed exhausted. After fueling up we re anchored closer into the beach wherethe boats 'dance'. Because of the eddys of the tide, the yachts are one minute far away from eachother and the next minute touchng! Elwyn and Mo advised us to put out fenders around Betsy. What was amazing is when we brought the anchor up the chain had actually twisted in on itself during the 'dancing' and had to be unfurled. We jib sailed between the reefs and the island up to Jolly harbour marina where we are having four small windows rebedded as they had begun to leak. From here we here we head north to islands we have not visited which will be exciting.

Diving, phosphorescence and the Barbers

24 February 2017
Before leaving Grenada we had a lovely meal at he Coyaba Hotel on Grande Anse Beach, where over 13 years ago we had stayed for our honeymoon! While we were still in Prickly Bay Grenada Colin decided it was time for a hair cut so sought out the local Barbers. The shop was run by two friendly Rastafarians with dreadlocks down to their knees. It seemed strange however, that as a Rastafarian you do not cut your hair on religious grounds and here they both were cutting mens' hair for their living! However, it was a very fine haircut. It was 30 EC (Caribbean dollars) which is about £8.00 nearly as cheap as a haircut in Moffat! In order to finish our Padi Open Water dive certificate we had to do a lot of practising in the shallows, taking our masks off and on, using alternative air amongst other things. On our fist dive we saw a huge Atlantic Trigger fish - amazing and a huge Grouper amongst a myriad of sea creatures and corals totally breath taking. After passing various tests and dive planning exercises we have now gained our certificates. I swam after dark one evening and the phosphorescence was like swimming through dancing diamonds at every stroke. Colin also saw the 'green flash' which in the Caribbean you are meant to see just after the sun sinks below the sea at the horizon when the sky is clear. We leave for St Lucia tomorrow, we will both be sad to leave such amazing dive sites.

Trinidad-Grenada-Grenadines

11 February 2017
Well we arrived back in Power Boats in Chagaramus Trinidad to see lovely Betsy with a very shiny hull. It took us 5 days to re stow all our belonging from the store there. We had taken everything off Betsy last May so she could be fumigated as found Palmetto Coakroaches! Only 4 but they are particularly large and scuttling! We had ordered a new bimini (suncover for the person at the wheel) which was excellent and high enough so Colin did not need to bend his head. Trinidad was very very hot and humid. Huge rain clouds formed and the ground became awash with water. Colin dripped continually so ended up having a small towel around his neck. Obviously I glowed attractively! It was a joy to finally be in the water again and feel Betsy move. We headed north into the night towards Grenada, passing east of the gas fields just north of Trinidad. We had a fantastic sail broad reaching with hydrovane through the night. We approached Prickly Bay in the south west of Grenada shortly after dawn. We had two days to prepare Betsy for our friends John and Sue Head. The first full day we sailed round to the leeward coast and found a beautiful anchorage at Halifax Bay just north of the capital St Georges. We had a bouncy run up to Carriacou. Sue did not feel unwell at all, even though it was fairly rough at times thanks to her new scopoderm patches. We headed up to the Grenadines and Chatham Bay in Union Island. We had a traditional Caribbean meal of fish, chicken, lentils plantain rice and vegetables. Our ferryman a chap called Obama (not the ex president) helped us ashore. The winds at the end and beginning of the year are called 'Christmas winds'. They are strong and from north of east. However, we managed to have a lovely sail from Union up to Bequai where we spent 2 nights. Turning south again, we had a blustery night at anchor in Cannoun. The winds were shrieking down the steep hillsides so we had an uncomfortable night. As the wind was too strong for the Tobago Cays we anchored in Salt Whistle Bay on the island of Mayreau. This was an idyllic anchorage a horseshoe of silver sand edged with coconut trees! A short sail to Petite Martinque for the night then a wonderful fast downwind sail to Carriaour and then onto Grenada where we berthed at Port Louis marina in St Georges. We had a very good 10 days with the Heads. Lots of great sailing and fun and games. Sue definitely found her sea legs and enjoyed it! As well as being a fabbie cook in the galley she managed to make a meal for 4 people from a very small and expensive red snapper! It was great having John with all his experience, helping with anchoring, splicing etc. We are now in Prickly Bay, the sail down from St Georges had Betsy going nearly 9knots, just with a reefed yankee! We had an updated windmill fitted as the old one ceased to work. We came to Grenada for our honeymoon over 13 years ago, so it is a special place for us. February 7th is Independence Day here in Grenada so, there were lots of steel bands and many of the houses were decorated in the colours of the Grenadian flag. We will be staying until the end of next week when we will head up to Carriacou to finish our Padi Open Dive certificate!

Last Blog-Diving and Turtles & Betsy hauled out!

12 May 2016
We stayed in Chatham Bay, Union Island for a few days before making our way down to Tyrell Bay in Carriacou. While we were in Chatham Bay the winds were strong one night and the dinghy turned over with the little outboard on it. So that was the end of it, thank goodness! It had worked at best only intermittently. In Carriacou we anchored opposite Lumbadive which gave us the idea of booking in for a 'trial dive'. It was absolutely incredible there were over a hundred species of fish and the colours were phenomenal. We dived to 38 feet for about 35 minutes and were totally mesmerized by the corals and this beautiful under water world. We decided the next day to enrol for our 'Open water dive' course. As we were heading for Trinidad a few days later we decided we could do more than half the course and finish it next year when we are back. Maybe doing some practise dives in Cornwall when we are home. As there are no water taxis in Tyrell bay Colin had to row every where. When we finished most of our course we had the diving flag painted on our big toes! (see picture). On our second dive Richard speared 5 lionfish. Diane his partner makes beautiful jewellery out of the fins and spikes and we ate the rest of them for our lunch! It will be a little different diving in Cornwall instead of a warm tropical reef, but I'm sure just as enjoyable.
As there were some piracy attacks just north of Trinidad last year, we were advised to head as far east as possible, past the gas field rig of Ponsietta. This we did and as we approached Trinidad the sun rose and we were greeted by a very playful pod of dolphins. They stayed with us for about 20 minutes breeching and slapping their tails down and riding our bow waves. Trinidad is very, very hot. It is like walking out into an oven! However, the yard here at Powerboats is very friendly and efficient, so we managed to rent an apartment. This has been wonderful, a stable bed and lots of space (well more than Betsy).
We had the most fabulous experience to round off an incredible year. We went with three other couples on a trip run by Jesse James (yes) to see the giant leather back turtles come ashore and lay their eggs. These gigantic lumbering dinosaurs very gently and skilfully create a 'bowl' shaped hole with their rear flippers and lay up to 120 eggs. As they lay them, they go into a trance like state and you can take photos and touch them. (see photo). Only one out of a thousand make it to adulthood. One of the biggest killers apart from fishermen's nets is plastic bags that float in the sea which they mistake for their jelly fish their favourite food. The wonderful guides at Nature Seekers in Matura on the east coast of Trinidad patrol voluntarily the 8 mile beach every night from March to August helping the adult females lay their eggs and protecting the hatchlings as they head for the sea. So armed with red head torches we headed to the beach with our guide. We saw around 7 turtles the largest being around 8 feet long by 5 feet wide.
Yesterday Betsy was hauled out of the water a momentous day. We had sailed over 6,400 miles since June 9th 2015 and she had looked after us through all our adventures. Cheers to Betsy! And a big thank you to all our most loyal supporters! Nic, AA, Iain and Caro to name but a few and huge thanks to Ewan who valiantly took over the editorial ship during our crossing, I don't know what we would have done without his jokes and pictures!

Heading south!

23 April 2016
We left beautiful Barbuda bound for Jolly Harbour, Antigua. There we met Elwyn from Ishtar who invited us to join him and Mo at the Royal Navy 'Tot' club of Antigua and Barbuda. We had a fantastic sail round to Falmouth Harbour. Unfortunately we got a bit caught up in on of the 'Oyster Regatta Races' (see photo) and had to alter course on several occasions! Betsy was no match for these racing giants. The 'Tot' club was thoroughly entertaining and suffice to say that after the large 'tot' of Rum the very memorable evening then became, less memorable and rather blurred and fuzzy. We had a very jolly evening aboard Ishtar the following day, meeting other folk from Cornwall. We met up with John and Chris on their Bowman40 Oriel for tea and cake. They have been out in the Caribbean for many years and were very generous in sharing their experiences. After having an enjoyable evening with Simon and Jenny from Fenecia (who we met in Porto Santo all those months ago) we left the socializing of Antigua and headed south. Next year we may stay for classics week. We anchored briefly at Pigeon Island Guadeloupe, then had a very wet sail down to Dominica. The rain fell so heavily from the skies the mountains were obscured. As we went below soaked through, it reminded us of many of our summer holidays sailing in Scotland! Luckily the following day dawned bright and sunny. A walk in the forests to find parrots was the quest with our guide Winston. Suffice to say after a lovely cool walk in the forest we saw briefly a pair of parrots flying away from us. We did however, hear them squawking. The Customs and Immigration in Dominica has to be the easiest and most yacht friendly of all the island countries. we have visited. You check in and out at the same as long as you do not spend more than 2 weeks. On our way south we picked up a mooring at Seacat's Pier and arranged a tour with him the following day. His real name is Octavious Lugay and he is a very experienced trekker and guide (see photo). We had a wonderful day eating the best little bananas ever, cassava bread smoked chicken from on of his chums kitchen a chocolate factory ending up with a cool dip in the Emerald Pool with the sound of the mountain whistler bird surrounding us. It was with a heavy heart we left stunning Dominica. The huge mountain outline of the island stayed with us as we reached Martinique and St Pierre. A quick overnight stop before setting off at first light for Rodney Bay in St Lucia. There we watered up and bought a few stores for the last few weeks on Betsy. Unfortunately there had been a violent incident in Wallilibou a few weeks ago so. we reluctantly decided to skip St Vincent. We had previously had a find time meeting up with Rosi and Orlando along with Curtis in Kearton Bay beside Wallilibou. So, from Rodney Bay we sailed then motored the d63 nm to Bequia. the weather here has become decidedly hotter as Summer appears. Apparently Trinida is even hotter! We cannot believe it is now less then 3 weeks before we will be flying back to the UK and our year out will be over!

Barbuda

04 April 2016
What a stunning and unspoilt island, long may it continue! It reminds us of Islay or Harris in the west highlands when the sun shines. Stunning light unspoilt beaches, landscape not dominated by man. No resorts or gated hotel complexes. Very friendly and independant people. We went to th frigate bird colony. This is one the largest in the world with over 20,0000 birds. They are famous for the males inflating their bright red chests at mating season. (see photos if you can!) The bay we are anchored in is called Low Bay on the west side of the island and has a 10 Km sandy beach! The people here are very independent and when a large development was planned the Barbudans went and together pushed their offices into the sea. They are also strongly opposing a plan by Robert Dinero and his rich chums to develop another site. They are trying to get round the fact that there is no land ownership in Barbuda! This makes it a really inique island with its own spirit. We hired bikes with Larry and Manice from Tern and went for a great bike ride to the east side of the island seeing wild donkeys on our way.
Betsy's Photos - Main
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Roseau to Batalie Bay to Portsmouth
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Big fish, eating cake and chilling out
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Marina Lanzerote and Betsy
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