Cailin Lomhara

Some stories of our life wandering the oceans, along with some random thoughts on matters either important or trivial. Through words and pictures it is our way to share our life a bit, perhaps even what we learn along the way.

15 August 2017 | Moorea, French Polynesia, South Pacific
12 August 2017 | Papeete, Tahiti South Pacific Ocean
01 August 2017 | Papeete, Tahiti South Pacific Ocean
26 July 2017 | Papeete, Tahiti South Pacific Ocean
12 July 2017 | Rangiora, South Pacific Ocean
10 July 2017 | Rangiora, South Pacific Ocean
05 July 2017 | South Pacific Ocean
03 July 2017 | South Pacific Ocean
28 June 2017 | Hiva Oa, Marquesas, French Polynesia
23 June 2017 | South Pacific Ocean
23 June 2017 | South Pacific Ocean
21 June 2017 | South Pacific Ocean
19 June 2017 | South Pacific Ocean
17 June 2017 | South Pacific Ocean
16 June 2017 | South Pacific Ocean
15 June 2017
13 June 2017
11 June 2017
10 June 2017 | South Pacific Ocean

Where to next?

15 August 2017 | Moorea, French Polynesia, South Pacific
Larry Green
Generally speaking, most people have some sort of loose plan concerning their activities, especially over the near term and certainly for big events. I am not jaded enough to think what we are doing is not a big event, nor do I think having a general idea of where we are going over the next few months is frivolous.
Sailing is however an activity that demands a certain amount of flexibility, like the wind is not blowing, or coming from the wrong direction, or the waves are bigger than I like or this is a lovely cove to be anchored in so why rush? There are literally unlimited reasons to not plan where to go or when and just a few reasons that make some planning essential.
For example, our insurance company is risk averse when it comes to hurricanes and tropical cyclones, so they lay out boundaries in my insurance policy that for instance state that I promise to be south of 25° South by November 15th in order to be away from the most probable locations of Pacific Cyclones.
That tidbit goes a long way in explaining why we are headed for New Zealand to spend the summer there. The point of this is to also provide intervening information, like where are we going on the way to New Zealand.
Well this morning I finished a spreadsheet with dates, locations, distances, start and finish times and days ashore which takes us up to mid November when we expect to arrive in New Zealand. Sorry to disappoint that I can not share the spreadsheet in this post but I can tell you about it.
The next two islands we will be visiting are Huahanie and Raiatea, each for a couple of days, before a five day stop in Bora Bora. When we leave Bora Bora we will be leaving French Polynesia. We will have sailed a couple of thousand miles across French Polynesia, covering a very small percentage of its area.
After Bora Bora, actually about 540 NM downwind, we will reach Rarotonga, where we will also spend about five days. A bit over 600 NM later we will arrive at Nuie for an additional five day visit. I know only what I have read or heard about either island, but if nothing else has been learned on this voyage I have come to believe that the superlative descriptions of people and places are understated so this next group of islands should be awesome.
After Nuie a short 250 NM sail will deliver us to the Kingdom of Tonga, one of the few countries on earth controlled by a Monarch. We plan to spend about 21 days there, then we sail to Fiji, only about 380 NM away. My impression of both Tonga and Fiji is they are the essence of the South Pacific. Though most of the classic films about the South Pacific were filmed in Moorea or Bora Bora (or elsewhere with background from these two islands) it seems to me that their names alone conjure up what many think this part of the world is like.
From Fiji we head for New Zealand which is a 1200 NM sail with few, if any, places to take a rest stop along the way. Twelve hundred miles used to seem like a really long trip, but not so much anymore. A little perspective may be in order. Back in the old days I used to sail this boat from Ft Myers to Mystic, CT in the spring and back in the fall. That trip was about 1200 NM each way and the conditions were not always pleasant. On January 1st this year the log read 5945 NM less than it does today. When we arrive in New Zealand it will be more than 9000 NM beyond the beginning of this year. To me, that is a hell of a good start on this adventure, and wherever it takes us next. More later.......

Getting a Move On................

12 August 2017 | Papeete, Tahiti South Pacific Ocean
Larry Green
It feels like we have been sitting here in Tahiti for months on end, but in fact it has only been since July 19th a period of three weeks. Tomorrow we are resuming our travels, heading back to Moorea for a few days, then via a couple of other islands to Bora Bora.
When we were in Moorea before our visit was focused on whale watching and we were anchored in the lagoon on the east side of the island. This time we are going around to the North side of the island and will anchor in Cooks Bay, which has more opportunities for diving, snorkeling, hiking and pretty much anything else we choose to do.
The three weeks spent in Tahiti have been productive from a fix the boat in exotic locations perspective. Nothing major broke on the passage but there were a few worn parts in need of attention. The most significant is a stainless steel device that is the major connection between the main boom and mast. It consists of three main pieces of machined stainless steel, which carry most of the loads of the sail moving a twenty ton boat through the water. The desire to keep that particular piece of gear from failing would be hard to overstate. There are two large bolts holding everything together that run through finely machined holes lined with bronze bushings. There should be no wiggle in either bolt, yet 20000+ miles of ocean sailing will introduce some wear. After our passage it appeared there was about an eighth of an inch or more play in both bushings, so had them removed and replaced by a local machine shop. It cost about 30,000 Pacific Francs for the work but when converted to US dollars about $300. We also had to repair the stainless framework we had built in Curacao to hold the solar panels and wind generator. It appears that job was under engineered as the twisting of the stern of the boat caused one of the welds to separate, actually the weld was fine, the stainless tubing around it failed. Everything else has been checked out and we are good to go for the next leg of our journey.
You would think that being all the way to Tahiti might suggest our journey west and south was close to ending. Not quite. Since leaving Panama about May 1 we have sailed about 5200 NM. Based on our current plans which take a fairly direct route to New Zealand, we have about 3100 NM to go between now and Pacific Cyclone season which our insurer says starts November 15th.
Having said that, we fully expect to relax and have a leisurely sail the balance of the way, with up to 20 days set aside for exploring Tonga and Fiji.
Last, for the moment is a comment on our new shipmate, Jessica. When I met her I was struck by several qualities that suggested she would make a good shipmate. One skill set she mentioned was that she could cook, and in fact rather enjoyed it. Now I don't know if this is a Canadian thing or simply her understated way of describing herself. However, last night she cooked dinner for us. Jessica is not a cook; she is an extraordinary chef with a deft hand at seasoning and a flair for presentation that rivals the best restaurants I have ever eaten in. She is also a truly nice person and a delight to be around; she knows how to sail (if she sails like she cooks, I will look like a novice). More later.............

Leg Two

01 August 2017 | Papeete, Tahiti South Pacific Ocean
Larry Green
Since transiting the Panama Canal in late April we have sailed a bit more than 5000 NM. We are very much in a different part of the world, one that is stunning in its physical beauty, so covered with flowers that the smells in the air are like a lite perfume, not the earthy smells we become used to. It is also a place where the people are friendly, and always seem willing to try and help especially those of us that are language challenged.
As many know, Stein completed her part of the trip with us on arrival in Tahiti. We, however, have become a bit spoiled having an extra pair of hands to help out, and a set of eyes to keep watch along with the real pleasure of getting to know a complete stranger from an other country. That in itself is an eye opening experience.
We were extraordinarily lucky when a couple of days ago an attractive young woman stopped by the boat and, after getting me out from under the cockpit where I was changing the generator oil, introduced herself and said she had heard we might be looking for crew and we might be heading to New Zealand. I did not deny both were true so we struck up a conversation.
Jessica is in her late thirties and has been sailing quite a while. Like the rest of us she got here by sailing across the Pacific from Panama to the Marquesas. Differing paths resulted in a boat change and she hopped a ride to Tahiti on a rather small boat with a large crew. Though they were heading in the right direction, cramped and Spartan living conditions, coupled with a burning desire to "just get there" made for a less than desirable situation. Turned out to be our gain.
Jessica is from Victoria, Canada and has a background in horticulture and environmental studies. Besides sailing she has worked as a chef. Rest assured I will report on her culinary skills. She did impress me with the baking our own bread and making cakes stories while crossing the Pacific.
She moved aboard yesterday and today we will do the necessary paperwork to officially make her part of the crew.
Meanwhile we have some additional work to get done, yet still hope to leave Tahiti this Weekend or early next week. The plan is to go back to Moorea for a few days of relaxation, then sail to Huahine in route to Bora Bora. A week or so there, then a couple of days in Raieta before heading off to Raratonga, then Tonga, FIJI, Nuie then New Zealand. More later

Mea Culpa

26 July 2017 | Papeete, Tahiti South Pacific Ocean
Larry Green
As I understand it, Mea Culpa is an admission of guilt and an assumption of responsibility for doing bad things. Guilty as charged for causing unnecessary worry as to our whereabouts over the past couple of weeks. After visits from multiple cruisers on the dock, along with the heavy hitters from the marina it seemed prudent to make a phone call to pass the word we were OK.
I must admit; however, it was a bit astonishing to find out there are so many people following our passage. I will do better.
Needless to say, I do have a fairly legitimate excuse for going dark for such a long time. Perhaps not legitimate, but an excuse nonetheless. Some lay recall that early on the passage from Galapagos to the Marquesas I spilled a cup of coffee on the keyboard of my laptop, making writing tedious and difficult under the best of circumstances. For some reason not known to me a small portable keyboard, connected by Bluetooth did not work much of the time, so I eventually discovered what the “Ease of Access” settings were for. One of them is a nifty on screen keyboard. Nifty is perhaps the view of its inventor, some geek with a perverse sense of humor. I will describe its workings to further assuage my guilt for not writing and provide a sense of what some people describe as easy.
First you open the on-screen keyboard, found as mentioned under Settings; Ease of Access. It normally occupies about 1/3rd of the screen requiring resizing and or moving around the screen on a regular basis. Using it to type involves moving the cursor over the letter you want, then clicking the mouse pad with a certain amount of force (so the computer knows that you definitely want that letter), once the chosen letter appears on your document you move the cursor to the next letter of choice and repeat. You must be very careful in your selection and in making sure the letter you want appears in your document because erasing is a big task. The easiest way to correct a mistake is to use a combination backspace/delete key that attempts to be helpful. How is it helpful? It only allows you to delete a single letter at a time, pausing and requiring you to repeatedly hit the key (generally harder with each strike) until you get to the incorrect letter, at which time you can fix it.
The bottom line is I sort of went on strike, or perhaps a bit nuts, and refused to write anything until I could repair or replace my laptop. Also, Al Gore has not spent much time here extolling the virtues of his invention, the Internet. It exists, but in a primitive form and seems to be monopolized by the French Postal Service (much better than its US counterpart) and Vinny the local phone provider. In some locales, you can receive a signal, which remains on for a bit then does not. Still, a lesser challenge than writing with the equivalent of a quill pen and no ink.
To answer the obvious question, I am writing this on my brand-new laptop. It is an ASUS and appears to have everything I need, including blazing fast i7 Intel processors, a combination hard drive using both a solid state flash drive and a traditional one terabyte SATA drive. The local computer shop was able to do everything I needed in terms of converting it from French to English except to change the keyboard. It seems most European countries prefer the metric system and a non QWERTY keyboard. Since I type with one finger from each hand the location of the letters poses little difficulty. The interesting and somewhat challenging thing is symbols and punctuation are very different. It requires the Shift key to, type a . and if you do not use the number pad typing numbers also require the shift key. I am quickly getting used to it and it does make me feel worldly to master this European thing.
Yes this is still a blog about our sailing adventures, I simply needed to rationalize my silence before proceeding. I believe the last adventure had us tearing along at about eight kts. On passage between the atoll of Rangiroa and Tahiti. Aboard with Charlene and I were Charlene’s good friend Mary, whose great passion is diving so she had flown about 14 hours from Orlando to experience the South Pacific, and our terrific crew, Stine, the great Dane.
We had spent four days in Rangiroa mostly diving and snorkeling with the abundant wildlife, including sharks, rays, zillions of fish and a few turtles. The other main attraction there was the Pearl Farm. Yes they grow pearls of amazing quality and value, and yes there was a shopping spree or trip.
The sail to Tahiti turned into one of those rare nights with stars, the moon and no clouds. Calm seas and a good wind made the 225 NM passage literally fly by to the point we had to slow the boat way down the last several miles to wait for sunrise before entering the pass at Tahiti. Once there we took on fuel, the first time in over 4000 NM of sailing, picked up our mail from the US and spent the first night tied to a dock since leaving Panama. Early the next morning we sailed to Moorea, about ten miles across from Tahiti and the location for most scenic pictures (and movies) of the South Pacific.
That was the first time I had anchored in a lagoon with nothing but reef between us and the Pacific rollers. Outside you could see and hear the roar of the ocean waves crashing on the reef, inside it was smooth as glass and the water was crystal clear. Visibility under water was close to 100 feet. I did some boat chores and the ladies went in search of whales. Successfully. They went with a guide who also caught a good size Tuna, which he promptly filleted and served for lunch. Ocean to mouth in under 10 minutes probably counts as “fresh fish”.
Since Mary’s flight home was Wednesday we returned to Tahiti on Tuesday. It was sad to see Mary leave, she had been great fun to have aboard and we thoroughly enjoyed her visit. Equally sad was the departure of our great Dane. When Stine signed on in Panama she said she might go az far as Tahiti, reserving the right to get off earlier if she choose to. Several of her contemporaries are here in Tahiti and we suspect they are off doing young people things, which is good. It was an absolute pleasure to have her aboard for the passage from Panama to Tahiti and all in between. When she joined us, she had about 500 miles sailing experience, when she left she had crossed the Pacific Ocean and sailed over 5000 NM. She has become an accomplished sailor with a great deal of self-confidence and we are certain she will excel at whatever she chooses for her life. We wish her Fair Winds and Following Seas. More Later

What a Difference .....

12 July 2017 | Rangiora, South Pacific Ocean
Larry Green
NOTE; This may seem disjointed since it was written yesterday. We actually departed Rangiora this afternoon at 1730. The passage to Tahiti/Moorea should take about 36 hours.

We could not see Rangiora until we were about 4 NM from the entrance to the pass. With the wind behind us blowing less than 10kts and the engine on, as we approached the pass with the tide ebbing we were making better than 8kts over the bottom. That quickly started to change as we got closer. For a brief moment, I thought "this is easy"; then the influence of the tide suggested it may not be quite as easy as I thought. In under a mile our speed dropped steadily from 8kts to less than 2. About a half mile of slow going before our speed started to improve and we were safely in the lagoon. That is when we could see what the inside of this lagoon looked like. Stunning does not adequately express what we saw. From outside we had seen what looked to be sandy beach and palm trees. Inside, I first noticed that in about 50 feet of water the bottom was clearly visible and the water was flat calm. For the first time in more than two months and over 4000NM of ocean the boat was not rolling. We could actually put a cup down and be confident the contents would still be in the cup when you picked it up for your next sip. I knew this would take some time getting used to. When looking at the shoreline there were white sandy beaches crowded with palm trees and few buildings visible. Those that were visible for the most part are hotels. No high-rise in sight. Round bungalows with palm thatched roofs are built on stilts over the water; each, on closer inspection, having a deck with stairs leading to a swim platform at sea level. Just like every picture you have seen or imagined of the South Pacific. Other than diving, snorkeling or visiting the pearl farms and market there are few attractions. Thus, it appears we will be leaving tomorrow (Tuesday, July 11) for Moorea with a fuel stop in Tahiti. About 210NM, we will take about 36 hours for that passage. Charlene and her friend Mary did the famous Rangiora drift dive through the Tiputa pass, sharks and all, yesterday. I am not that experienced a diver to ride a swift current underwater, especially after experiencing driving a 40,000-pound boat through the same pass. We all did the snorkel ride through the pass in the afternoon and a dive in what is known as the aquarium this morning. Much more my speed. More later�...�...�...

What a difference .....

10 July 2017 | Rangiora, South Pacific Ocean
Larry Green
We could not see Rangiora until we were about 4 NM from the entrance to the pass. With the wind behind us blowing less than 10kts and the engine on, as we approached the pass with the tide ebbing we were making better than 8kts over the bottom. That quickly started to change as we got closer. For a brief moment, I thought "this is easy"; then the influence of the tide suggested it may not be quite as easy as I thought. In under a mile our speed dropped steadily from 8kts to less than 2. About a half mile of slow going before our speed started to improve and we were safely in the lagoon. That is when we could see what the inside of this lagoon looked like. Stunning does not adequately express what we saw. From outside we had seen what looked to be sandy beach and palm trees. Inside, I first noticed that in about 50 feet of water the bottom was clearly visible and the water was flat calm. For the first time in more than two months and over 4000NM of ocean the boat was not rolling. We could actually put a cup down and be confident the contents would still be in the cup when you picked it up for your next sip. I knew this would take some time getting used to. When looking at the shoreline there were white sandy beaches crowded with palm trees and few buildings visible. Those that were visible for the most part are hotels. No high-rise in sight. Round bungalows with palm thatched roofs are built on stilts over the water; each, on closer inspection, having a deck with stairs leading to a swim platform at sea level. Just like every picture you have seen or imagined of the South Pacific. Other than diving, snorkeling or visiting the pearl farms and market there are few attractions. Thus, it appears we will be leaving tomorrow (Tuesday, July 11) for Moorea with a fuel stop in Tahiti. About 210NM, we will take about 36 hours for that passage. Charlene and her friend Mary did the famous Rangiora drift dive through the Tiputa pass, sharks and all, yesterday. I am not that experienced a diver to ride a swift current underwater, especially after experiencing driving a 40,000-pound boat through the same pass. We all did the snorkel ride through the pass in the afternoon and a dive in what is known as the aquarium this morning. Much more my speed. More later.......
Vessel Name: Cailin Lomhara
Vessel Make/Model: Tayana 52
Hailing Port: Anna Maria Island, FL
Crew: Charlene Green & Larry Green
About:
Both are life long sailors with a shared dream to sail the world. Charlene sailed her previous boat, CatNip, a 35 foot Island Packet catamaran throughout the Bahamas single handed a couple of years ago. Charlene holds a U.S. [...]
Extra:
It has been some time and many miles at sea since this "something extra" was updated. When first written we had not yet spent nearly 3 years in the Caribbean, which we now have, we were not in Panama waiting to transit the canal prior to a Pacific crossing, which we now are, we were not ready to [...]
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Cailin Lomhara's Photos - Main
Pictures from the passage to this part of the South Pacific along with pictures we will add of what we see while we are here.
22 Photos
Created 15 May 2017
At 0430 Friday our Pilot/Advisor came aboard and 30 minutes later we were underway headed for a single day transit. Some of the photos are taken inside the lock(s) others of the scenery along the way.
40 Photos
Created 30 April 2017
Our passage to Columbia. Lots of wind, mostly from abaft the beam.
6 Photos
Created 13 January 2017
A beautiful, pretty much uninhabited spot to welcome the new year with it's possibilities
9 Photos
Created 1 January 2017
When all your worldly possessions are aboard your boat/home it rides a little lower than designed. We finally raised the waterline in Curacao
4 Photos
Created 28 December 2016
One of the most unusual islands in it's beauty and charming people. Most of these photos were taken when we were touring the island with Hubert Winston as our guide. There are no marinas and only two viable anchorages, one in Portsmouth, the other to the north in Roseau. We were there through Christmas 2015.
7 Photos
Created 11 January 2016
Some of us, family, friends and folks we have met
22 Photos
Created 3 September 2014
The cats, Buzzi and her cat Bobbi
8 Photos
Created 3 September 2014
Views of places and people we have met along the path.
26 Photos
Created 3 September 2014
Photos of Cailin Lomhara
12 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 29 June 2013