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Calou's Blog
Cruising with the crew of CALOU on the Baja Ha-ha and Pacific Puddle Jump
Just A Few More Hours (Day 24)
John
04/18/2011

John's Blog Updated. Original post with photos: http://travel.reservationkey.com Latitude: -10.04453 Longitude: -138.30516

With only 33 miles to go we are anxiously peering over the horizon trying to spot our first glimpse of dry land. Visibility is limited though thanks to a lots of clouds in the area. I think the ocean wanted to give us one last taste of its power before letting us out of its grasp for this leg of our trip. Today has been one of our windiest days of the entire trip. But that means we are moving along at a good clip and are on track to have the anchor down just after sunset today.

During lunch the storm really opened up, giving us a good drenching. I did not mind since I had been at work all morning in my cabin and was quite hot. I did make a lot of progress on a nice new feature for my software.

While today marks the last day of what will likely be the longest ocean passage I will ever make, never fear, the blog posts will continue. You can look forward to new sections for Marquesas, Tuamotus, and Tahiti. I've had a good time writing these daily updates and I am sure I will enjoy reading back over them in the future. Although we haven't yet seen the new world we have entered, there are lots of signs we are very close. Now instead of receiving KCBS from San Francisco, I can only tune in a French station on AM 740. Even the satellite terminal knows we are in a different part of the world as I now have the choice of whether to beam my signal to the Americas satellite or the Asia Pacific satellite. On the short wave radio I am now pulling in signals from Australia and New Zealand. Tomorrow we will begin exploring our new world that we have finally reached. Stay tuned.

Pacific Puddle Jump 2011
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04/19/2011 | Jan Koehler
You guys must be in Fatu Hiva now. Get some sleep!
Getting Close
Bruce
04/17/2011, 150 nautical miles from the Islands

The last 24 hours we logged 138 miles. We had very good winds so we were able to make good time. We're just 150 nautical miles from our landfall, if we have good winds we might arrive tomorrow evening, if not, the day after. There has been a slight change of destination. We are heading to Fatu Hiva to meet up with our friends on sailing vessel Phambili. Fatu Hiva is just 30 miles from Hiva Oa so we just had to adjust our course a few degrees to the left to go to Fatu Hiva.

We are all looking forward to not having to do any more night watches, and getting a full night's sleep.

Pascale baked a loaf of bread this afternoon. So for dinner we had garlic bread, made with Pascale's freshly baked bread and fresh butter and garlic, and pasta with clam sauce. We had a whole pound of baby clams from from Costco which went into the clam sauce.

Pacific Puddle Jump 2011
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Making good speed towards land
Bruce
04/16/2011

The trade winds returned late last night and have continued all day; we have been making 6 to 8 knots continuously with 14 to 18 knots of wind from the South East and a 10 foot swell. The sailing is excellent and we hope to make 150 miles in the next 24 hour period.

We're just about 240 nautical miles from Hiva Oa, which means we'll be arriving at our destination in about 2 days or less if the winds hold up.

We're not exactly heading for Hiva Oa just yet. We are heading for an anchorage at a small island 4 km from Hiva Oa, Baie de Hanamoenoa on the island of Tahuata (9 deg 54.5' S, 139 deg 5.4'W) where we'll have a rendezvous with some friends and fellow sailors.

We ate the last mango today, it was very ripe, but it is amazing that mangoes can hold up three weeks without refrigeration; I would recommend sailors bring lots of mangoes. My theory is that mangoes are a tropical fruit accustomed to the heat and humidity, so they last longer than other fruit. We also ate one of the last oranges; they are getting dry and a little sour but have held up very nicely overall.

Pacific Puddle Jump 2011
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04/17/2011 | alan
love your blog keep on
Getting Close (Day 22)
John
04/16/2011

John's Blog Updated. Original post with photos: http://travel.reservationkey.com Latitude: -6.80113 Longitude: -135.05856

The wind is back and we are making great progress. If we could keep this speed up, we have only about 47 hours before we arrive. It is hard to believe that today we entered into our fourth week at sea. Other than our brief swim at the equator, we have been on this boat non-stop. Also, we have seen no other people for these last 22 days. Just meeting some new people will be a fun experience. It is hard to think of any other activity besides sailing that involves such isolation. At least we have five people on board. Lots of people do this single handed, meaning there is only one person on the boat. Being completely alone for this length of time seems like it would be even harder to manage.

We haven't had too many boat projects lately, but today Bruce trimmed one of the floor boards so that it would fit better. It may have swelled up slightly and was extremely difficult to remove. Projects awaiting us when we arrive include cleaning the bottom of the boat, attaching a new flag halyard to the spreaders, installing a new radar unit, and replacing the refrigerator. None of these are too time consuming so it should be much less work than what we were doing in Mexico before we left. Longer term, we may haul out in Tahiti to replace the forward head thru-hull. The handle broke off during our first holding tank cleaning.

The weather is definitely a bit cooler now. The water has also cooled a bit. It is now 33.2C. Inside my cabin right now it is 29C whereas around the equator it was always 30C.

Pacific Puddle Jump 2011
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Day 21
Bruce
04/15/2011, South of the Equator

The previous 24 hours were good sailing. We logged 140 nautical mile sduring that period, which was characterized by flat calm interrupted by strong winds.

Today, the trade winds have disappeared. Today is our 21st day at sea. We have had very light winds throughout the day, in fact so light that by mid afternoon we had less than 5 knots of wind, coming from the North. So we were obligated to start the engine and make our way to our destination, hoping for more trade winds along the way.

We are actually hoping for a squall to come our way, to give us some wind so that we can sail again.

Pacific Puddle Jump 2011
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Winter Approaches (Day 21)
John
04/15/2011

John's Blog Updated. Original post with photos: http://travel.reservationkey.com Latitude: -5.30744 Longitude: -133.33444

It didn't take long for signs of winter in the southern hemisphere to start showing up. Since crossing the equator we have had much more clouds and rain than on the northern side. The good part is that these storms bring more wind which means we can keep moving. Yesterday we made about 130 miles which is pretty decent, especially considering we have had a lot of slower days recently. This weather also is less predictable. After light winds all morning, we are now motoring since the wind has pretty much disappeared. The storms also bring rain which is refreshing. Last night I was so hot I sat on deck in the rain and really chilled out for awhile.

Pacific Puddle Jump 2011
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Day 19
Bruce
04/14/2011, Southern Pacific Ocean

Today we finally found the tradewinds and sailed south west towards our destination, Hiva Oa. The sailing was highly variable, which kept us in our toes and busy all the time. Squalls are abundant, so we found ourselves frequently reefing the sails in anticipation of a big blow, then unfurling the sails after. At around 3 this afternoon, the wind died to almost nothing, less than 5 knots. We tried raising the spinnaker but even that would not stay filled. Finally around 3:30 PM we started the engine and motored. Less than a half hour later we had wind again, and within minutes we had 20 to 25 knots on a beam reach. We had a nice time sailing, getting 8 to 9 knots boat speed. Finally we saw another squall approaching so out of prudence we reefed the sails yet again. This was followed by about an hour of rain, then clear skies and reduced wind, so we unfurled the sails again.

This has been the pattern today: big wind, big seas, followed by very light winds and flat seas.

Pacific Puddle Jump 2011
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Squally Weather (Day 20)
John
04/14/2011

John's Blog Updated. Original post with photos: http://travel.reservationkey.com Latitude: -3.9184 Longitude: -131.60971

We seem to have entered squall territory as we are encountering them much more frequently now. Last night we sailed through several mild ones. During my watch last night we were able to do more than six knots for much of it, thanks in part to winds from the squalls.

Just as we were getting ready to have lunch we entered into the middle of several squalls. Conditions went from sunny and hot to completely overcast, rain, and cool temperatures. Suddenly we were making 7.5 knots over ground. If only we could keep that speed up we would be in the Marquesas in 78 more hours. I had a fun time driving the boat at those speeds, and it was a nice break from the monotonous slower speeds we've been experiencing. Then, about an hour later, the skies quickly cleared and the wind died. Thinking conditions were good for the spinnaker we had all hands on deck helping to raise it. But once we got it up the wind died completely so we lowered it and are now motoring along at 6.5 knots, with some help from a light breeze. At this rate, my GPS says we will be there in 81 hours. But unfortunately we don't have quite enough fuel to motor all the way. Plus, we are trying to save some diesel for when we arrive as we have been notified that Hiva Oa has run out of diesel and they don't expect more until April 28th.

It is fun to see how we are slowly closing in on Hiva Oa though. We are almost back inside a regular chart on my GPS. For the last thousands of miles we have been off the chart, so to speak.

For lunch today we had a nice cabbage salad with canned pineapple and diced tomatoes. We finished the last of our pressure cooked meat a few days ago and are now starting to dig into our supply of cans. In one hammock we are down to one mango, one grapefruit and two oranges. In the other hammock under the dinghy davits we still have lots of tomatoes and apples. Our bread supply is a few loaves of Bimbo brand bread that is growing some white mold, but we can't taste the mold when the bread is toasted and peanut butter spread on top. White mold is harmless and we are glad it is not black mold which is not healthy to eat.

Our solar panels are working nicely and when we have wind our wind generator produces enough power at night so that we don't need to charge the batteries. Last night was one of the first nights we did not need to run the motor at all to charge the batteries.

Pacific Puddle Jump 2011
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