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The Southern Cross Chronicles
But ne'er in all his watches,this rugged world across, Did he hear God's voice to starboard, till he sailed the Southern Cross
Lobster Pound
Gary
03/11/2006, Burnt Coat Harbor, Swans Island, Maine

BURNT COAT HARBOR, on the south shore of Swan's Island, is an attractive, well-protected harbor with one of the island's largest communities. It remains a serious fishing town-lobsterboats still leave the harbor at first light, rocking you gently in your bunk, and roar back in at dusk.


A Working Harbor
Gary
03/10/2006, Fulton, Texas

The fishing fleet continues to fight for space in the little commercial harbors of the Texas coast. Sadly, the explosion of resort development and the flood of imported sea food will finally displace the generations that have made their living from the shallow bays. They will be missed.

Charlotte Amalie
Gary
03/03/2006, St. Thomas, USVI

Our great friends Richard and Temple Fourment have welcomed us aboard Artemis and shown us the wonders of the Virgin Islands. This past winter, they met us at the Airport in St. Thomas and we spent a wonderful evening anchored off Charlotte Amalie.

Dreaming
Gary
03/03/2006, Caribbean

In the southern ocean, sailors could no longer see the North Star and thus had to find a new method of navigation. The Souhern Cross constellation is generally visible below 30 degrees north and rises in the sky as one sails south. Its long dimension points to Celestial South as it rotates across the night sky.

When we first saw these stars rising above the Caribbean, we were tucked behind a protecting reef in Culebra. It was a never to be forgotten experience.

This digital montage depicts an imagined voyage of S/V Southern Cross sailing on a "reach" to a future meeting with its namesake.

"Then home, get her home, where the drunken rollers comb,
And the shouting seas drive by,
And the engines stamp and ring, and the wet bows reel and swing,
And the Southern Cross rides high!"


L'Envoi, Rudyard Kipling

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