The Delivery Guy

John delivers new catamarans mostly from Cape Town, South Africa, to various destinations around the world - follow his next trip from London, United Kingdom to Fort Lauderdale, USA.

11 December 2012 | North Atlantic
08 December 2012 | North Atlantic
01 December 2012 | North Atlantic
23 November 2012 | North Atlantic
14 November 2012 | North Atlantic
05 November 2012 | North Atlantic
03 November 2012 | North Atlantic
29 October 2012 | North Atlantic
26 October 2012 | North Atlantic
23 October 2012 | Sines, Portugal
06 October 2012 | Brighton, UK
26 September 2012 | London
13 September 2012 | Cape Town
21 August 2012 | Indian Ocean
15 August 2012 | Indian Ocean
07 August 2012 | Nosi Be, Madagascar
29 July 2012 | Mozambique Chanel
27 July 2012 | Richards Bay, South Africa
05 June 2012 | St George's Harbour, Bermuda
28 May 2012 | North Atlantic

Slow Progress

17 September 2009
We have managed to make great use of the fast flowing current that runs along the continental shelf on the northern coast of South America, resulting in some very good noon to noon runs. However, all good things eventually come to an end and so has the thrust of the current. As we passed Suriname, we started loosing the current and then headed another 5 degrees north, to our next waypoint, just southwest of the island of Barbados, From there we go through the St Vincent channel and enter the Caribbean Sea. As I write this (Thursday morning 01:00 local time), we are still over 450 nautical miles from the waypoint.

We still have plenty of food in our freezer from Cape Town, which has now been supplemented by very good catches of fish (photo above of Andries with his Dorado caught yesterday evening, just before we were going to roll in our lines for the day). I like the Dorado, which has a lovely textured light meat, while Hardy and Andries appear to also enjoy their sashimi, although they have now run out of the fresh tuna they caught the other day,

Our "ship spotting" competition comes to an end when we get to our next waypoint. The whole object of the competition is to try and make the crew doubly vigilant whilst we are making way in the shipping lanes - and it works. Hardy is leading with 15 ships sighted whilst Andries and I are joint second with 10 ships each. It looks like Hardy will be taking the prize of a bottle of good Caribbean rum which I will buy at the shop in Tortola, where we will be stopping for a few hours next week to take on diesel and fresh water and get rid of our bags of garbage, which, I am sure, will walk out of the forward locker by themselves. The heat at the moment will have "matured" the contents pretty well by now!

Yesterday (September 16), we were still two days behind Gavin, the delivery captain on board a Leopard 46, also heading for Annapolis. Kirsten, our only female delivery captain, was in Tortola and about to depart whilst Piet, on board hull #002 of the new 38' Leopards, was about a day from Tortola. Then I have not heard from David on board a 40' Leopard or from Wayne on board another Leopard 46 - Wayne is heading for Fort Lauderdale and not Annapolis, as far as I know. So, all the delays in Namibia have put us at the back of the bunch, which has resulted in us pushing quite hard to ensure that we make the deadline of October 5 to get the boat on the show.

As I type this, the night sky is occasionally being lit up by an electrical storm over the horizon to the north of us. This is the first really big lightning display we have had on the trip and, I am sure, not the last we are going to experience as we edge our way north into the tropically unstable northern hemisphere. Yesterday night we also had our first real rain squall of the trip. At about 04:00, whilst I was on watch, this huge black cloud slowly moved over the boat and for a few minutes, the heavens opened and poured buckets of fresh water onto us. It was great, as it washed all the Namibian dessert sand and dust out of the rigging. The down side was that it did not last long enough to wash away all the mud that washed onto the deck. In the morning we washed down the deck with salt water, once again leaving a good layer of salt on the deck. The next rain squall should was away the itchy salt!

And whilst on the subject of the weather, we are monitoring the tropical weather in the north Atlantic on a daily basis to ensure that we do not get anywhere close to a tropical storm or hurricane. However, right at the moment we need some wind to get our speed up - we currently only have a miserable 6 to 8 knots out of the east-northeast and would like about 15 knots out of that direction. So, I will leave you whilst we all pray for the right wind out of the right direction. Thanks for taking the time to read my rumbling notes. Regards from Andries (expert fisherman, cook and crew member), Hardy (first mate and excellent mechanic) and myself, John (the guy who is supposed to be in charge).
Vessel Name: Ultima Life
Vessel Make/Model: Majestic 53
Hailing Port: Cape Town
Crew: John
John Titterton has sailed over 350 000 nm in the years he has been delivering sailing vessels. He has sailed the Mediterranean Sea, South and North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and Pacific with a bit of the Indian Ocean thrown in for luck! This blog follows his deliveries as they occur. [...]
Ultima Life's Photos - The Delivery Guy (Main)
No items in this gallery.