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Diesel Duck
So far so good
Marlene
05/14/2011, Shelter Bay Marina, Panama

OK, the gen set is almost in the engine room, over and beyond the door frame, sitting half way on the support beams.

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Next step
Marlene
05/14/2011, Shelter Bay Marina, Panama

To manufacture a strong cradle to be able to slide the generator, Benno is shortening the support beams to fit into the engine room, bolted together with 10 mm threaded rods and some shorter pieces it will support the generator safely.

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Hurry up with the picture!
Marlene
05/14/2011, Shelter Bay Marina, Panama

It looks amazingly easy, but the boom is holding our generator weighing 400+ pounds which is tilted to fit through the aft cabin hatch. Together we are lowering the gen set and then straightening it out again before setting it onto the bed. Two pieces of 4x4" 8 feet long wooden beams (bullnosed edges with the router and sanded on every side, so that I don't get hurt by splinters in my hands while handling the beams, Benno said) are laid across the bed to support the weight and to balance the gen set. From this position we are lowering the gen set slowly onto the cabin floor and more, although shorter, pieces of 4x4" wooden supports.

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The gen set has arrived!
Marlene
05/13/2011, Shelter Bay Marina, Panama

At last our new generator made it to the Shelter Bay Marina and is sitting now on Diesel Duck's aft deck.
On Monday, the 2nd of May, the cargo ship "Maersk Wolfsburg V" sailed into Colon with our generator stored in one of the containers. Mrs. Dayana Madrigal, from our custom broker, Aimar S.A., told us that they would not pick up the container until the following Monday, a week later, to bring into their warehouse in Panama City. Then, when all consolidated items of the container would be cleared through customs, the custom broker would arrange for the shipment of our generator back to Colon and on to Shelter Bay, now probably to arrive on Wednesday. But on Wednesday we were told "ma┼łana".
Thursday morning dawned like doomsday. The sky turned pitch black and a torrential rain pelted down onto our decks. In fact, at 8 a.m. it was so dark that it felt like night time. Benno was fearful that it would be raining all day so he sent me into Colon to purchase a roll of plastic sheeting, because we didn't know if the generator would be covered in plastic. Luckily by midday the rain had stopped and even a little sun poked through the clouds.
So finally in the afternoon on Thursday, 10 days after arriving in Colon, our baby was delivered and we felt like new parents, too. A little annoying was the extra charge of $100 the custom broker sprung on us for a "custodian service" in cash of course. When I inquired what this was for, the explanation was that a customs person was required to accommodate the generator to make sure the goods were "in-transit" to Diesel Duck". I asked the truck driver where the "custodian" was and he just shrugged his shoulders.
We hired a forklift truck from the marina and in no time at all the gen set was unloaded by Victor the yard guru and set onto the sidewalk where Benno stripped off the shrink wrap, cardboard, excess support packaging and accessory boxes. Several guys from the marina staff hung around to have a look. They proved to be extremely helpful by lending a hand to shove the heavy engine onto a cart. Although heavy to push, Benno was just happy to bring her home! With the help of the boom and some extra muscle from a neighboring boat the generator came to rest on the aft deck. Stay tuned...



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05/14/2011 | Hillu
Hola Marlene und Benno - sieht ja gut aus euer "Baby". Viel Spass beim Einbau. Hoffe wir sehen euch noch einmal zum Sundowner im Indianerland!
Gruss Hillu und Hans von der "Destiny"
SSCA flags were spotted on power boats
Marlene
05/11/2011, Shelter Bay Marina, Panama

Diesel Duck arrived at the Shelter Bay Marina by the Panama Canal on April 24th. I noticed two other power boats tied to the docks that were flying their SSCA flags and we went to say hello. The "Two by Sea" from Palm Beach Gardens, FL and the "Serena Ray" from Blaine, WA. Very nice!
Since we were here last, three years ago, the place has changed a bit. The long-time stored boats on the hard are now all fenced in and are gated. Boats in the yard that need work are parked separate and the owners are encouraged to rent a room at the duration of haul-out at the onsite hotel (upstairs in the main building) at market price. If the owners opt to sleep onboard while hauled, a surcharge of $10/night is applied. Also if the boat had a slip to which it will return, the slip charge is applied on top of the haul-out charges. A swimming pool and hot tub were added to the premises as well as additional shower/washrooms. A gym with very nice equipment, but also of course for a user-fee was built for the enjoyment of the cruisers. The nicest addition, I think, is the large air-conditioned lounge upstairs with comfortable leather sofas, tables, chairs, Internet stations and a flat screen TV with DVD player. The marina premises now also sport a mini market and a small ship's chandlery with limited supplies, but at least it's something.
This morning the free marina shuttle bus to the "4Altos Mall" in Colon didn't arrive because there was a problem at the Panama Canal Bridge which got hit by a freighter and no traffic could pass. The bus also brings in the marina employees. Coincidently, the power went off at the marina docks at around 8 a.m. (it was off also for several hours on Sunday) and apparently the people who could fix the problem were on the bus! Naturally, today the weather is overcast, so our solar panels are not much help to keep up the charge for the house batteries. Even the boats with wind generators are out of luck as there is not a whiff of wind in the air. And yes, Benno and I removed our old generator last Sunday, so if the power doesn't come back on, we'll have to run the main engine to charge the batteries to keep the fridge and freezer going. Thank goodness we didn't have to do that as the hydro was restored in the afternoon and the canal brigde got fixed.


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Having fun while waiting
Marlene
04/30/2011, Colon, Panama

What is happening on Diesel Duck?
For several months now, Benno and I have been contemplating of buying another diesel generator. The one we have now, a one cylinder Farymann at 3600 RPM, 4.3 KW gen set from Norpro has accumulated 4500 hours in the past 5 years , but lately it needed more service and required more spare parts to keep up with our demand. We decided to order a new 5 KW Northern Lights with a 3 cylinder Lugger at 1800 RPM and it seems that it is a favorite model found on many yachts and the demand is high. The dealer for the new gen set wanted a money transfer for the purchase which didn't work from our secluded anchorage in the San Blas islands and to do this we had to leave the islands for a while to have this taken care of. At the same time we purchased the additional fuel hoses and other items required for the new installation. And of course we took the opportunity to restock our food lockers while we had the chance.
So then once we put that in motion, we returned to our favorite islands at Kuna Yala to do some more snorkeling while waiting for the new generator to come. The weather was absolutely lovely and we spent many hours between the reefs every day. On Diesel Duck we do not carry scuba equipment, so snorkeling it is with the occasional dive down to look at something, holding our breaths. I started to photograph underwater with an Olympus waterproof camera good for 33ft but most of the time I couldn't make out anything while wearing my mask and with the sun reflecting on the display. We bought an underwater housing for the camera which improved the view. But then Benno got me a Panasonic Lumix camera which has a 12x optical zoom with an underwater housing which works much better. It even has a built-in GPS.
But, alas, while I am trying to capture the underwater life I am being tossed around by the waves and the fish don't hold still either when I'm finally ready to press the shutter button they have moved on and my picture displays a lovely coral but NO fish! Thank goodness I don't have to pay for picture developing and I can just erase all this still life! However, some fish didn't get away and I would love to share my pics with you if I could find a way to post them in this blog so they can be enlarged to a decent size. The Photo Gallery which our blog provides is not great and the pics are still much too small.


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Oh No!!
Marlene
03/07/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Trolling for fish is fun and quite often we are successful in hauling in a good catch. A week ago, while coming back to the San Blas islands from a shopping trip at the El Rey supermarket in Sabanitas, Benno lost our lure, a "Blue Bomber" and the whole line spun out from the reel and ripped off when some big fish took a bite. Big, big fish!!!
This really was a tragedy because it was our only "Blue Bomber" lure, our--trophy -- good luck - dinner providing lure! But Paul and Sheryl came to our rescue when they brought with them from Canada a few "Rapala" lures which are quite similar. Naturally Benno wanted to try the new lure and get a good sized fish for all of us for dinner. So in-between island hopping the fishing rod was put to work. Not long after we had a strike. Big excitement on board and instructions were shouted to slow the boat, get the fish bonker, bucket, pliers and gloves. Paul grabbed his film camera and I went with my photo camera to capture the action.
The fish appeared to be at least three feet in size and he put on a big fight. Benno really used his muscles as he pulled hard and kept reeling him closer. Just when I thought I should hand Benno a gaff to bring him in, the fish jumped high in the air, spit out the lure, which had a lot of tension on the line and the "Rapala" lure with two sharp 3-prong hooks shot back to hook (as Benno commented dryly) into his family jewels, but thankfully they were protected by a good pair of swimming trunks.
We agreed that the fish that got away appeared to have been a Wahoo.


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Filming in the San Blas Islands
Marlene
03/06/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Toward the end of February our friends, Sheryl and Paul Shard, the film makers of the well known television series "Distant Shores" arrived for a visit onboard Diesel Duck here in the San Blas Islands. We were looking forward to seeing them again. Three years ago, they came to film an episode with us in the Virgin Islands (see: Season Five, Disk 1, episode: Virgin Islands) and this time they wanted to film the Kuna Indians, handmade colorful molas, palm covered islands that are surrounded by beautiful reefs amid azure blue water and a trip into the jungle. The "Distant Shore" series are aired on TV or you can buy their DVDs and also read their interesting blog and newsletters at "Distant Shores"
click here to get to their web site
Although this was a working vacation for Paul and Sheryl, it turned into a lot of fun for all of us. Benno certainly suggested and injected Paul with all kinds of ideas and took them to places that were worthwhile filming. However, our friends only stayed a little over a week and there is only so much you can do and see during this time. But the episode will be fantastic, so make sure you are going to watch it when it comes out!!!
In general, Kuna Indians are shy to be photographed or filmed and permission must always be given. We were encountering some Kuna women that were happy to be on film and when Paul showed them the footage he took of them, the girls giggled with delight.
I showed Sheryl the molas I had purchased and explained the different qualities. Almost all the Kuna women make molas, but we invited Lisa, a famous mola maker onboard to explain the methods of mola making to Sheryl and Paul and she was willing to be interviewed and filmed. Of course Sheryl bought a pile of molas from Lisa that were exquisite in color, design and stitching. The only problem was there were too many pieces to choose from.
And then there was another talented cruiser lady that made lovely jewelry who visited us while we were anchored off Green Island (Kanilildup) enjoying sundowners on the foredeck . Oh the choices one has to make....

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Mola shopping at the Lemmon Cays
Marlene
03/06/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Sheryl and Paul are viewing molas on display.

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Shopping for jewelry
Marlene
03/06/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Unique handcrafted jewelry brought to your boat by the artist and one piece nicer than the other. So which to choose from?

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Images from the jungle
Marlene
03/05/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Kuna women tending a fire at the family gravesite.

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Images from the jungle
Marlene
03/05/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

High up on the mountain in the jungle we turned around at the waterfall. Here are shots of Paul attempting a jump down into the pool, Lisa in mid air and a Kuna guide jumping from the cliff. Refreshing and exciting.

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Images from the jungle
Marlene
03/05/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

The Kuna men tend gardens up in the mountains and we saw banana trees in clearings. On the trail we came upon calabash trees, wild pineapple growing on the side and a coco bean ripening on the tree.

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Images from the jungle
Marlene
03/05/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Wild flowers we saw climbing up a trail through the jungle.

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Bad things happened in paradise
Marlene
02/25/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Sometime in January the single hander "Don North" with his little dog "Kuna" on his sailboat "Windancer was reported missing in the San Blas Island, Panama and a search for him started on the SSB Panama Connection Net which runs daily at 08:30 a.m. on 8107.0 KHz.
Then in February the news hit the sailing community in the San Blas Islands that Don's body was found in Portobello by scuba divers, with a hole in his head and weighted down by rope and anchor chain. No sign of his boat or dog. But this news turned out to be false. The body belonged to another gone missing sailor and single hander, a Frenchman "Jean-Pierre Bouhard" and his boat the "Levante" was missing too!
It darned to us sailors now that we had some serious pirating going on here in Panama. As things evolved daily and many cruisers became curious to find out what happened, the boat "Levante" a 50 foot aluminum catamaran, was found hidden away, but it was now renamed "Twyss"
In the meantime the search for "Windancer" was still active. At the morning Panama Connection Net a cruiser reported a nearby anchored abandoned sailboat in the East Lemmon Cays near Yansaladup. But it carried the name of "Green Twilight" on the transom. This then turned out to be the missing boat "Windancer", but renamed. No sightings on "Don North" and his dog "Kuna"
Further on it was discovered, that a Spaniard with the name of "Javier Martin" had been hired by both skippers "Don North" and "Pierre Bouhard" as crew to help them to sail their boats to Colombia.
Who is "Javier Martin"? In the middle of December, two weeks before Christmas 2010, during the worst storm of the century here in Panama, "Javier Martin" attempted to sail his 44 foot Benetau sailboat "Twyla" with 11 backpackers (hikers) onboard from El Porvenir in the San Blas Islands to Colombia. However, he turned back, tried a night entry, missed the channel in the dark and his boat went aground on a reef and sank shortly after.
A search was now in progress to question "Javier Martin" A few days later the Panama Border Guard caught him on the Pacfic side of Panama having two horses, carrying three firearms, $14,000 in cash and in possession of Don North's passport. Further it was discovered that he had made ATM withdrawals from both "Don North" and "Jean-Pierre Bouhard's" bank accounts after they went missing.
During the investigation it also became known that the sunken boat "Twyla" was not registered to "Javier Martin" but in fact to a sailor in the Virgin Islands who went missing many years before.
To follow up on this and for many more details, look at the famous website of the panama-guide.com of the dedicated writer "Don Winner"
click for an article about Javier Martin here

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03/07/2011 | lindsay james
please contact me on the above mail address regarding javier martin
The "Levante"
Marlene
02/25/2011, Panamarina, Puerto Lindo, Panama

"Jean-Pierre Bouhard's" boat the "Levante" and then renamed "Twyss" was found and does not display any names now.

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What is left of the "Twyla"
Marlene
02/25/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Only the mast and some of the rigging are still visible of the "Twyla"
In this picture which I just took the local Kunas are diving on the wreck trying to recover anything that is still usable.

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What have we been up to the last couple of weeks?
Marlene
02/16/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Benno and I were exploring new anchorages with spectacular reefs together with our friends Donna & Cosmos from "Koukla" and Leila and Erin from "Blow Me Away". While snorkeling we spotted many Eagle and Sting Rays, Sand Sharks, tropical fish in fantastic colors and Groupers large enough to feed a crowd, but smart enough to successfully escape the hunters. However, the 10 inch (25cm) King Helmet shell Benno captured is now part of my shell collection.

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Birthday Party
Marlene
02/15/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

The birthday boy is tending the BBQ for the next batch of meat to be grilled while some of the guests are busy eating!!

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Lots of fun all around
Marlene
02/15/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Then there were dinners on board the vessels of our friends and on Diesel Duck. A potluck on shore with talented guitarists from Ireland, New Zealand and Germany who entertained us with their music and "Vonny-T" hosted Wolfgang's birthday party on one of the islands in the Eastern Lemmon Cays yesterday afternoon. I have to mention that the food has always been delicious and was expertly and lovingly prepared. There are many gourmet cooks among the cruisers.

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Watching through the spy glass
Marlene
02/05/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

There is no shortage of firewood and dry palm tree fronds to set up a fire on this little island. Our friends are busy with the preparations to build a BBQ pit.

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02/05/2011 | jacob
Tres romantique!
Guess who is coming for dinner?
Marlene
02/05/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

It is blowing a good steady 20 knots and a little chop runs through the channels of the San Blas islands. But on the lee side of a beautiful, tiny island with a sugary white sand beach we spy two young Swiss cruisers attending an open fire. They are busy setting everything up for an evening dinner with two guests. Gesina and Leo from the sailing yacht "Seluna" are preparing a romantic dinner served on the beach. The food, a chicken dinner with rice, a multitude of vegetables and aromatic spices is cooked inside a Maroccan tagine, a clay pot with conical lid, which is put on a grill onto the open fire pit. The food releases and cooks in its own juices. Need I say more? It was absolute scrumptious!



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Wireless internet over the cell phone
Benno
01/22/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

This picture shows our Digicel phone on the right, the Vodafone Mobile Connect USB stick in the middle and on the left for comparison a 4GB USB flash drive

Wireless internet over the cell phone network has not the packed speed of transmissions you expect from the normal wifi or a broadband cable, but it has the similar speed of your phone cable 12 years or more ago, when you had your desktop computer hooked up and patiently awaited a download to finish. The other thing is, it does not permit speech on Skype, only the chat option works. The cell phone networks don't shoot themselves into the foot, they want you to use the cell phone for speech traffic and make money on it.
For the hardware to use this technology, you need to have:
#1: A GMS cell phone with simcard
#2: 3G USB Modem Dongle (Vodafone Mobile Connect USB stick in our case)

To explain #1: We purchased a new inexpensive locked Digicel GMS phone on a Kuna Island for $35.00 and a new locked Mas Movil (Cable & Wireless) phone in Colon recently for only $16.99 including simcard. The GMS cell phone you already own might work well, but when you venture to a foreign country, only an unlocked cell phone will accept the new simcard. Many cell networks supply locked GMS phones which don't permit you to change to a different cell network. You don't have to throw your locked, fancy GMS phone away. Most Caribbean nation phone stores have a wizard in-house who will unlock your phone in no time for a little fee. All you have to do is to purchase a new simcard with a new phone number. In our case here in Panama, the price for a new simcard is $3.00 US.

To explain #2: The 3G USB Modem Dongle can be purchased in phone stores stateside or at cell phone networks' own stores, on the internet and as well at the countless phone stores worldwide. G3 stands for "generation 3" or "third generation" technology. The USB Modem Dongle is called also: HSDPA Modem - USB Stick Modem - Mobile Broadband Dongle - USB Modem - mobile connect USB stick etc. Here again, most of these dongle/sticks are locked in to a cell network and you have to get them unlocked to be able to use them everywhere!
We had purchased ours from a fellow cruising guy who had several of these Vodafone Mobile Connect USB sticks and the knowledge to unlock them. His price was cruiser friendly too, so we were happy to get one and he also installed it for us. The Vodafone Mobile Connect USB stick has a little slide-out tray to accept the simcard and another slot for a micro SD card, which permits this dongle to be used also as a USB flash drive.

How does it work?
You load enough money in prepaid scratch cards into your GMS phone. In our case it was $20. We had to dial *142* and the number 40# to purchase one day of internet access for $0.75.
7 day's access is $4.25, purchase number 60#
15 day's access is $8.00, purchase number 80#
30 day's access is $14.95, purchase number 100#
Of course these numbers apply only to the Digicel networks here in Panama. After the purchase, the network will send you a message back to ask for confirmation of your purchase. You have to enter *142*1# to accept the purchase, or if you changed your mind, enter *142*9# to cancel your purchase. After your acceptance you get a message confirming the deal with exact time and day stamp.

Next, you switch off your phone and remove the simcard to install it into the USB Modem Dongle/stick. The dongle/stick is now inserted into one of your computer's USB slots. In case you want to raise the dongle for better reception of the signal above your boat's coachhouse or wheelhouse, or for the reason because your boat is made out of metal which shields the the computer off and prevents the signal to reach the inserted dongle, then you might use a USB extension cord of no more than 15 ft. to raise the dongle. For a longer than 15 ft. run you have to use an amplified USB extension cord. To do this, run the extension cord to the outside thru a hatch or portlight and tie the dongle up with a plastic cable tie and perhaps slip a small ziploc bag over the dongle to prevent rain to shorten it out. On the Vodafone Mobile Connect USB stick the internal software will now bring up a menu and you click with your mouse the "connect" button. Now you are ready to browse on the internet in the cell net coverage area. The other manufacturer's stick/dongles will work similar!

As an addendum to the above, please keep in mind the following:

A 1 day subscription will allow you 20 MB (megabytes) of data download
2 days of this service will limit you to 40 MB of downloads
7 days will permit you 1 GB (gigabytes) of downloads
15 days and 30 days are also limited to 1 GB of downloads only.

So, if you happen to run out of bytes before your subscription ends, the Internet will stop working and the remaining balance of money on your simcard will rapidly be eaten away by the service which is trying to connect. AND, you have to wait for the remainder of your subscription time before you are able to sign in again and pay for another time period of Internet usage. Should this happen to you, dial *100 and ask the operator to have the unused Internet time cancelled from your phone number so you can reactivate it.
1 GB is 1000 MB or roughly 1 billion bytes of computer data storage.
1 MB is 1 million bytes.





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Wireless internet over the cell phone continued
Benno
01/22/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

This picture is showing our Digicel phone with the simcard removed from the slot with big white dot.
In the middle the Simcard and
on the left the Vodafone Mobile Connect USB stick with the open slide out simcard tray.

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Internet under anchor, but no wifi!
Benno
01/21/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

Just picture this: you are onboard your boat anchored in the lee of a picturesque island which is covered with palm trees and a white, sandy beach in the San Blas islands away from the bustle of cities, civilization and wifi and you are surfing the internet.
Once we left the West Lemmon Cays with the Satellite Internet access to cruise among the many beautiful cays, we had to find another solution to connect to the net. At Isla Wichubhuala, just three miles west from the Lemmon Cays and just half a mile south of Isla Porvenir, we bought ourselves a Digicel cell phone for $35. Wichubhuala is only 200 yards long and 180 yards wide, but heavily populated with Kuna huts from one end to the other. At the government dock is a general store selling all kinds of stuff including cell phones which work only with prepaid cards. Here we purchased the least expensive locked Digicel GSM phone with a Digicel simcard including phone number and 25 dollars worth of prepaid cards. Back at the boat, Marlene burned the first 5 dollar prepaid card calling her mom in Germany. At least we can be reached by cell phone now. The San Blas islands have cell coverage. One cell tower is in Isla Porvenir, the other is in Isla Nargana and another is by the Carti islands. South of Isla Porvenir sits always a bunch of cruising boats under anchor just a few hundred yards from the cell tower. We were told at Nargana there are even more cruisers under anchor and the same at Carti. So why are these cruisers sitting there? It is the access to internet via cell phone simcard inserted into a 3G USB Modem Dongle, which permits you to surf on the net at slower speed, but not offering Skype service. Now you know why all these cruiser internet junkies are hugging the cell towers.
In the next write up we will explain how this technology works in detail with pictures.
And by the way, this is sent through this device from a remote place here in the Kuna Yala.

On the picture below you can see the white 3G USB Modem Dongle inserted into a USB slot on Marlene's laptop

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Blog update onboard Diesel Duck
Marlene
01/20/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

I'm working on the blog update.

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Charging a cell phone for a Kuna Indian
Marlene
01/19/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

A Kuna Indian came by and showed us his Digicel phone, saying: "Bateria, bateria" obviously, he wanted us to charge his phone. On these little islands there is no electricity and cooking is done over an open firepit. A few hours later he picked up his fully charged phone, including a magazine for his wife so she could look at the pretty pictures and candies for his kids.
Now, who is he going to call, his stockbroker perhaps or do some horse betting?

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04/12/2011 | Fred Blume
Looking at your pictures, must be having a great time. All is well here.
Hope to hear from you
Fred and Zorka
01/02/2014 | SittingMoose Shaman
...I can safely assume...as I would have done the same...that, [a] "Diesel Duck"...can only mean: "Unassuming, hard working friendly folk are aboard me..." They'll help you."
I've read not a few accounts about how George Beuler's wonderful boats/ships have this endearing &/or aura of respect and comradery effect on passing/encountering captains & their crews...in very diverse & quite separate places.
These aquatic marvels have captivated me ever since I first saw one on the 'net...
The name..."Diesel Duck", is...so-o, I dunno ...spot-on, poetic. Even to say, "symphonic".
I am happy for your wonderful adventures...as I 'drop-in' from time to time.
Fare thee well, Captain and Crew...
A view of our surroundings
Marlene
01/08/2011, Kuna Yala, Panama

A look at our neighborhood. This is how most of the cays look like. Many islands are uninhabited with only coconut palm trees and white, sandy beaches. We like it here!

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Fresh Fish every day
Marlene
01/04/2011, Coco Bandero, Kuna Yala, Panama

We are presently anchored at the western end of the Coco Bandero Cays. These little islands are strewn behind a large reef. It is very peaceful here. Fishermen in their Cayucos come sailing or paddle by to offer us their catch of the day. You can bargain a little with them, but the price for a Spanish mackerel or similar fish is usually one dollar. Aah, life is good.


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