The adventures of Yacht Flirtie

27 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
27 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
26 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
26 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
22 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
20 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
16 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
09 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
07 July 2017 | Cala Canelle (position: 42 21.159'N 10 55.348'E)
05 July 2017 | Porto Azzurro (position: 42 45.646'N 10 23.553'E)
04 July 2017 | Portoferraio, Elba (position: 42 48.339'N 10 19.334'E)
03 July 2017 | Portoferraio, Elba (position: 42 48.339'N 10 19.334'E)
02 July 2017 | Port Toga marina (position: 42 42.480'N 09 27.299'E)
29 June 2017 | Port Toga marina (position: 42 42.480'N 09 27.299'E)
27 June 2017 | Port Toga marina (position: 42 42.480'N 09 27.299'E)
26 June 2017 | Macinaggio marina (position: 42 57.506'N 09 27.294'E)
25 June 2017 | Calvi (position: 42 33.755'N 08 45.702'E)
22 June 2017 | Calvi (position: 42 33.755'N 08 45.702'E)
21 June 2017 | Calvi (position: 42 33.755'N 08 45.702'E)
20 June 2017 | Girolata (position: 42 20.926'N 08 36.879'E)

in the shadow of Vesuvius - Pompeii

27 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
Bruce & Caroline
Arguably this video is too long at approximately six minutes...but anything shorter would really be doing Pompeii an injustice.

Choosing a backing track was simple; it just had to be Pink Floyd live at Pompeii!


We hope you enjoy....


the roman city of Pompeii

27 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
Bruce & Caroline
Pompeii is vast! To date approximately 50 hectares have been excavated and a further 14 hectares is still to be discovered.

Historically the first signs of the buried city came to light at the end of the 16th century but the city remained hidden until the mid-18th century when excavations were started under the king of Naples and they have continued excavating and renovating ever since.

At the time of excavation houses still contained furniture, ornaments, gold and silverware, work tools, kitchenware, bronze and terracotta lamps. Most of these artifacts were moved to the archaeological museum in Naples. Unlike Herculaneum which was flooded by mud, Pompeii was buried in ash and cinders so they were also able to recover buried 'organic' objects. They achieved this by pouring plaster into the imprints left after their decomposition. Using this method they have been able to recover many things which otherwise would have been destroyed, including the final resting positions of humans.

Inside the walled city, the sheer scale just hit us. Yet again we were left speechless as we walked along the streets, popping in and out of modest dwellings to large and magnificent villas. Many rooms were decorated with beautiful frescoes and tiled floor mosaics with the occasional marble artifact on display.



Giant stepping stones lay across wide roads used as a pedestrian crossing to ensure that there was no contact with the effluent running down the street. Several roads were indented with the signs of carts - it must have been a thriving city in its day.


imagine the clatter of wooden carts coming towards you!

We couldn't believe that there were 25 brothels in Pompeii, virtually on every street corner. One in particular (the wolf's den) was fascinating and contained actual stone beds and erotic wall paintings depicting different sexual positions for intercourse - an advertising board for the various specialties that the brothel could offer in exchange for a bottle or two of wine and bread, depending on the chosen 'service'.


sex in the city... unashamed!

Pompeii boasts the oldest surviving amphitheatre in the roman world where gladiators fought wild beasts. It's in excellent condition with substantial remains of tiered seating as well as the upper gallery. Nowadays, it's used by the occasional artist who can appreciate the natural acoustic sounds of such an amphitheatre. Pink Floyd, recorded live with no audience at Pompeii in 1971 and more recently Sir Elton John performed here.


amphitheatre

Despite the early start unfortunately we still didn't get around to seeing everything because we ran out of steam by mid-afternoon - the heat coming from the stone was so intense.

Pompeii has provided us with another fascinating insight into the everyday life of a roman living in a city. We've thoroughly enjoyed visiting Hurculaneum and Pompeii and being able to compare today's lifestyles with the Romans. All things considered, today's lifestyle is so very similar. ;-).

The site is fantastic and another highlight on this year's trip. A short video montage is to follow shortly.


rows of amphora containers and a plaster cast of a victim

the ancient roman town of Herculaneum

26 July 2017 | Civitavecchia (position: 42 03.892’N 11 48.684’E)
Bruce & Caroline
CAUTION: One photo viewer's may find disturbing!

Herculaneum was an ancient roman town destroyed, buried under several meters of volcanic mud and overwhelmed by clouds of scorching gas generated from the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD79.

The town remained hidden until the 18th century when the digging of a deep well revealed some exceptional statues. However, excavation ceased once the nearby town of Pompeii was discovered, which was significantly easier to excavate because of the thinner layer of debris covering the site but from the 20th century a new campaign of excavations began which exposed about four hectares of the ancient city including boathouses lining an ancient shore... that's a brief resume of the excavation timescale but more comprehensive detail can be found online.

We've never actually walked a roman town so this provided an absolutely fantastic experience and one never to be forgotten as we were able to walk down actual streets lined with shops, houses, villas, taverns, baths and bakery.


a high street

With limited tools it really made us wonder how on earth the Romans completed such grand and tall buildings complete with columns, arches, rendering and guttering.


inside one of the rooms

So much has been preserved due to the lack of air and moisture; wooden joists remain albeit a bit scorched. There are remains of roofs, doors, street signs, shop signs, ovens, grain mills and several walls highly decorated with frescoes depicting everyday events. Then there are floor mosaics made with the tiniest of tiles and in just fabulous condition. We were speechless with the occasional vocal word of WOW, amazing, incredible.


vibrant colour!


look at the depth of this skimmed wall, wow!


the public house with marble-covered counter, serving hot food and drinks

The reality of the destruction really hit home when we reached the boat houses only to find the remains of human skeletons both young and old. Brave souls that possibly decided to take shelter from the eruption and hope that they would be rescued but never actually survived due to the extreme heat of the gases.


skeletal remains

A visit to Herculaneum certainly provided an extraordinary insight into the life of a roman town. Brilliant and another highlight.
Vessel Name: Yacht Flirtie
Vessel Make/Model: Trident Voyager 40
Hailing Port: Dartmouth, UK
Crew: Bruce and Caroline Trott
About:
Welcome to Sailing Yacht Flirtie's blog.

Our blog serves as a personal record of our adventures and experiences since leaving the UK in 2012 whilst allowing family and friends to keep up-to-date with our whereabouts. [...]
Extra: email us: bandc.trott@gmail.com
skype us: distant.drummer797
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Yacht Flirtie's Photos - Coruna 2014
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Yacht Flirtie

Who: Bruce and Caroline Trott
Port: Dartmouth, UK

Where are we now?