Dreamcatching 24/7

Basil Yes Dear.

12 August 2017
9th August 2017 Russian Bay
Today we left Poros town quay and explored the nearby anchorage options. strong wind warnings were in place so we needed somewhere to protect us from the North. Love Bay looked very nice with its blue parasols reflecting in the blue water but there was very little space for the boat to swing on anchor so we headed around the corner to Russian Bay which offered us a few options. We dropped the anchor in the middle of one of the bays below a lovely house with its steps coming down to the sea and a little sitting area. We were settled for the three days of winds or so we thought. As the sun began to set behind the hills the swarm of charter boats made their approach to take over the bay and disrupt our peace. One by one they dropped their anchors and reversed to the rocks before tying lines off to them. They were all very keen to be next to each other resulting the row of boats extending now into what had been our swinging area and not far off our anchor. Mike was becoming twitchy due to the potential for damage if we did swing onto them, the solution was straight forward we let another length of chain out allowing us to drop back and attach a stern line to a rock behind us.
As Mike climbed out the water with his mask and snorkel he declared "That's it, I'm happy now" , PLOP, as his snorkel dropped into the water in slow motion, like one of those Peter Kay moments. Knowing he could not grab it he also jumped as if in slow motion to catch it. Before he could enter the water the wind blew the paddle board across the stern of the boat on its line. As Mike resurfaced it was apparent he had caught his face on the line as he had entered the water, with blood trickling down from the cut which extended from his cheek across his nose and up over the eyebrow on the other side. Now I know I quite like the Captain Jack Sparrow/ Johnny Depp look but I really didn't expect him to replicate it for me. My little Captain Sparrow was not amused. This felt like it was now proceeding into an episode of Faulty Towers, Mike impersonating Basil Faulty, almost jumping up and down banging the snorkel on the boat step, breaking fragments off it to the point it wasn't worth the effort of having plucked it from the sea. I didn't feel it would go down well if I turned into Sybil, "now then Basil, I don't think that is helpful" . I just bit my lip and offered a dampened tissue to clean up the blood. "Bloody charter boats, tomorrow when this lot move we will go round the corner and tie up to those rocks. We sat in silence until in my most sympathetic tone I asked if he was ok, "I don't think it's a laughing matter", oh I don't know, Basil and Sybil did OK in their comedy of errors.
The following morning Mike sat on deck observing for the movement of boats, the only apparent movement was that of a huge motor boat that decided to moor alongside us, thrusting his engines into reverse to get up close to the rocks. With that, our boat began to drift round, towards the charter boats moored over our anchor, Mike pulled at our stern line thinking they had cut it on their propellers but no, he stood holding a perfectly intact line and a bowling. All that thrusting had blown our line off the rock. Time to get up front and start pulling the anchor up quick before the wind took serious hold of the boat and caused some damage. "She's up", that's my call to let Mike know the anchor is off the sea bed and making her way out the water, enabling him to steer the boat.
Just around the corner there was a vacant spot, the anchor was dropped on instruction and we began to drop back to the rocks. Mike took a line to the shore, using my snorkel so he could check for Sea Urchins underfoot. Despite his best efforts to pull the boat straight back the wind kept pulling it away, with the line secured to the rock it was time to winch the boat into a straight position in line with our anchor. And relax!!! To our port side and on the shore are the remnants of the Russian Naval Base that they blew up as they departed in the 1800s, hence the name.

Not many of you will know this but I am not a confident swimmer and despite all Mikes efforts to prove I am not going to drowned, and that I can swim, my confidence does not appear to be building. A second stern line needed attaching so with my heart beating fast I offered to take the line to the shore and secure it, this went without hitch and as I returned to the boat I could hear Mike saying "right turn left and swim to the shore" I chose to ignore this and climbed back on board. By 18:00 the wind had died and the sea was still so with the promise of a glass of cold wine at the Taverna I eventually plucked up the courage to swim to the beach, as long as Mike stayed close by. The swim back was much more relaxed, that will be the wine, and I did not feel the need to swim harder or faster as the water got deeper.
The following day my challenge was set, to jump in the water off the side of the boat, I would need to mentally prepare myself for this. Once again the wind died so it was ideal for me to swim back to the beach again but no wine today !! After a lot of mental preparation and jeers from Mike, "come on Jacqui it's not that bad, go on it's like the kids game, in, up, back on board and jump again till you get used to it". Three jumps, each one feeling like your falling through time, anxiously waiting and holding my breath for my body to come back up to the surface. "Right now, I want you to dive off the back of the boat".... 2 belly flops and one not bad dive, it was time to call it a day and have a glass of wine, on board though.
Today I had challenged myself to snorkel to the shore and release the stern lines as we departed our mooring. I have to admit I was anxious and assume that is why I was awake early, took the rubbish to the bins on the paddle board, and prepared the winch so as soon as I was back on board I could start lifting the anchor. On the plus side there was no breeze. As I slipped into the warm water Mike told me that when I released the second line I had to keep hold and he would pull me back to the boat, simple. I had already prepared myself to the fact that the tension on the anchor would result in the boat moving away from me when I removed the lines and I didn't want to panic myself. As I swam to the first one I could see the knot under the water, "I can't undo that under water" I could now feel my heart racing, "calm down, calm down" I kept telling myself. With the tension released off the winch I could hook the line with my feet and pull it up to the surface. Now for the second one which I tied and required me climbing up the rock to unwrap it. Feeling a bit of a prat with my snorkel in my mouth climbing up the rock I discarded it from my mouth, this was a mistake. I finally unhooked the bowling from the rock and holding on to the rope I stepped back down into the water. As Mike pulled the line I tried to swim whilst grasping the line but with the line pulling my head under I felt the only option was to let go. As I looked I could see the boat drifting away, I swam with all my might but seemed to be making little headway, I could feel I was getting tired so rotated onto my back till I could eventually grab the line that was now hanging over the side of the boat. Enough drama for one day I think......

36 knots, grab bag at the ready and thats on the mooring.

27 July 2017
26th July 2017 Astrous
This morning we awoke to another strong breeze warning in place so the decision was to stay on anchor or move to Astrous, a newly finished harbour with electric and water. Due to having being on anchor for a few days Mike was keen to fill the water tanks so we decided to set off early and beat the winds.
Astrous is described in the pilot book as "a pleasant place to be, with a visit to the castle or right into Astrous proper if you fancy a walk through agricultural lands and orchards. There is nothing you should see, but plenty of lazing around to be done" Sounds good to us.
As we made our approach into Astrous we saw the Venetian Castle stood in its splendour with the sun shining down on its walls. Once into the harbour we found there to be a couple of visiting yachts and lots of space. Due to the Katabatic Winds which can blow into the harbour we decided to drop our anchor off to port so as to minimise the risk of our anchor dragging if it were to blow up. Not long after our arrival the afternoon wind started to pick up but nothing to cause alarm. Whilst we were establishing ourselves I heard an anchor chain, looking out the window was a couple who it transpired were from Australia and were leading a charter group. We assisted them with their lines, once secure the gentleman came to thank us and told us they had come to assist their group of 12 charter boats who were arriving between 15:30 and 17:30. Given we had space on our sides we decided that we would go for a walk tomorrow, meaning we could sit and wait for their arrival and protect Dream Catcher from any mishaps.
The Port Police arrived and asked to check our papers. Mike asked about paying for our mooring and getting water and electric. The Police said all of this was dealt with by a separate company and after a quick telephone call said they would be down shortly to sort all this out. It's a good job we planned to stay two days. By now some of the charter boats were making their way in, the Australian couple co-ordinated their mooring by standing of the Quay wall shouting instructions of where to drop their anchor, how much throttle, which way to turn the wheel. I know Charter boats get a lot of criticism but they all did really well and at no point did we feel the need to jump up and fend them off our boat.
Everybody in and it was time for the crews on the flotilla's to exchange stories of how much speed they got, what sort of sail they had etc. The leaders went about their business in the typical cheery manner telling everybody where tonight's briefing would take place followed by cocktails. The wind was by now picking up in strength and credit to the leaders they checked every boats anchors and lines, making adjustments to ensure they were safe for the predicted force 6 and before they departed up the hill for the briefing.
Not everybody went to the briefing, with some staying on board which was fortunate. All of a sudden shouting could be heard and despite the wind one boat could be seen pulling off its mooring and lifting its anchor, it appeared their anchor had dragged. Fortunately despite the conditions they did really well and managed to re-set their anchor. Minutes after the boat next to them repeated the process only they seemed to struggle more getting back onto their berth. The harbour was by now pretty full but over the breakwater I could see a boat making its entrance, a Greek boat, I think due to the adverse weather he quickly identified a gap and started to manoeuvre into position dropping his anchor potentially over multiple others. The boat caught by the wind began to swing "side to" across the bows of the adjacent boats. With nothing else to do they started to pull off, lifting their anchor and another with it, which just happened to be the first charter boat that had earlier dragged its anchor. There was a heated exchange and eventually the Greek was free, this time he decided to go "side to" on part of the ferry jetty, this was not without trouble as he quickly began crushing the side of another boat.
The wind was true to its forecast and blew all through the night causing the usual water slapping on the hull resulting in Mike trying to sleep in the saloon, me I slept fine.
The charter boats were departing early and we knew we needed to be about because the Katabatic winds would blow them across onto us and this seemed to be one of the boats that needed more reassurance. Several other charter boats departed their mooring in the wind with a degree of ease and supportive instructions from the Australians on the quay. When it came to our neighbours the staff told the crew what to expect as they started to leave the mooring and what she wanted them to do when she shouted "thrust engines" because of the need to avoid our anchor chain which the wind would blow them onto if not careful. Dad was on the wheel, Mum and younger daughter on the anchor and older daughter on the stern line. The leader shouted to them "we need to get a move on, before that storm hits, start lifting the anchor, ease off that line" I was stood on our port side with a roving fender to prevent any damage. For some reason they stopped lifting the anchor, "Keep lifting the anchor" but it appeared it has stopped working as the boat swung into our side in the strong wind which was now blowing. Three of them were now up on the front with the anchor that wasn't working, "George get off that wheel, set the trip, George, quick" Mike was pushing them off us and I was holding the roving fender, by now I could our anchor chain going under their keel and you could hear the chain straining. Frantic screams "George" followed by instructions from the quay, George was following instinct and doing the wrong thing resulting in Mike telling him to stop accelerating with our chain scraping along his keel. Eventually they were free of us and the leaders were very apologetic. It was a blessing when with a little tension on our winch we were secured again.
The wind got steadily worse but now with all the charter boast having departed we were taking the full brunt of it on our port side, even with the newly rigged mid ship line we were being battered, healing over to starboard, it was time to get the grab bag ready just in case it got worst. Thunder lighting and 38 knot winds on our side made it a rough passage to nowhere, or I hope we go nowhere, strong winds are expected until tomorrow.....
Just another day in life on board in a stress free environment, I think not!

Two nights for the price of three !

18 July 2017
14th -17th July 2017 Aegina
This morning we planned to sail to Aegina and meet up with Anthony to pay our "cash" deposit for our winter storage. In Aegina the moorings are "stern to" with your anchor laid and there is limited space in a very popular town for tourists. The popularity of this place is probably secured by the amount of ferries which come into the port. As a result of the difficulty getting a berth we decided to depart our anchorage early in the hope we would arrive as boats in Aegina were departing for their days sail. Pulling into the harbour at about 11:00 it appeared the only space was reserved for trip boats, we hovered about observing for anybody who may be about to leave, very soon a yacht began to pull off its mooring , Mike positioned himself ready to reverse in but a large motor boat had different ideas. He had arrived after us but obviously felt the fact he was large and had crew gave him priority, shouting, "Captain, I go there", Mike backed off giving recognition to his superior size. Again' we were left sat waiting and watching. We had read that you are best mooring as far from the entrance as possible due to the swell caused by both the frequent ferries and if there is a southerly wind, with a lot of damage being done to boats. Very soon another boat began to depart its berth, right at the end opposite the entrance, between a 75ft motor boat, Arianna, and the pick up point for a small trip boat. As we began to position ourselves the crew on the Ariana shouted and indicated they wished us to drop our anchor more across to the starboard to be sure we were clear of their anchors, by doing this our space was limited by the small ribs and the result was that we did not have as much chain out as is really required, never the less we were in and safely tied up. Anthony duly arrived for his cash, a pleasing on the eye Greek, with a lovely smile but limited conversation, he kept smiling at Mike as if he was waiting for him to tell him a story, with neither Mike nor Anthony having the gift of the gab, Anthony decided to depart.
Shortly after, the trip boat moored next to our berth returned. On board was Michail the captain, a portly gentleman of 67 years who had been sailing all his life and his trusty young crew, who like all crew is the whipping boy and blamed for everything that goes wrong.
Michail was not happy at the fact that we were moored next to his spot or the angle of our anchor chain, as with all Greeks he began shouting and becoming very animated in his verbal exchange. "This boat is like a box, the wind gets the side and I struggle to get it in, your anchor is laid all wrong, I may pick it up when I leave". This conversation was repeated several times, word for word. We explained why our anchor was laid as it was and this was what we had been instructed to do. Mike said he would stay around and if there was a problem with our anchor he would jump in the water to release it. The Captain of Arianna and his crew heard all the noise and by now were stood on deck, a further heated exchange took place between both captains in Greek, one turned to Mike saying "you are fine, I will explain in a minute" The exchange continued until the point Michail shrugged his shoulders and hands up to the sky and toddled off. By this time another berth had become available on the other side of Arianna, Mike offered to move but the Captain said, "no, you stay, you are safe here, this is the best place to be, protected by my boat"
On the next outing of the trip boat we stood by watching and waiting, the departure was without a problem so we could now relax and enjoy people watching off the deck, there was certainly a lot to see. The following day we had planned to stay due to a strong wind warning, but this didn't halt the proceedings of the shed next to us and his regular trips to Moni Island. Despite Mikhail's objection to our presence he told us we needed to stay put for the next few days and maybe enjoy one of his trips, this was no weather for us to be sailing if we didn't have to. Mike and Michail were forming a beautiful relationship by now.
Later that day after a nice swim in the clear waters we returned to the boat and were down below when we heard shouts of "Captain, Captain", Mike stuck his head up to see the crew on Arianna summoning him to assist Michail who by now was stuck on our pulpit with his passerelle. Michail vigorously told us how his anchor had failed and despite getting the pickup buoy the wind had got his shed and carried him across onto us. Once hand manoeuvred into place Michail began shouting at the whipping boy about the problem and what he should have done to ensure it didn't happen, over and over again. We sat chuckling to ourselves. It was time for them to depart again and it was soon apparent that the wind was causing his shed a problem the lines came off and were quickly put back on before a second attempt with more power in an attempt to clear the berth before the boat swung too much onto the adjacent dinghy's, ribs etc. They were off but with trailing passerelle ropes disaster occurred in the form an outboard engine which was quickly snapped from its bracket and enjoying a trip in the water round the harbour. Mike began shouting but with all the revving of the engine could not be heard, one man just stood pointing as if in a trance at where the engine use to be in disbelief whilst the fuel man on the quay wall managed to attract Michail's attention to the engine bouncing along behind. The engine was hauled in and a heated argument commenced to the amusement of the trippers on the boat, like an episode of Faulty Towers with the whipping boy taking to role of Manuel. Oblivious and regardless of the wind pushing them across the harbour or the arrival of a fast cat Michail could be seen jumping up and down and heard shouting his head off. The crew off the motor boat were falling about in hysterics; Michail was obviously a frequent source of amusement to them. Shortly after they departed the harbour the Port police took a leisurely stroll to look at the damage, shrugged his shoulders and wandered off to deliver more containers of fuel finely balanced on his moped.
The following day we went out for a trip with Michail to Moni Island, clear waters, sun, wine, Peacocks and reportedly Deer but we didn't see those. Michail we think lived alone, he would sit on the back of the trip boat till late at night telling people about the trips. On the last night he moved from his usual seat onto an adjacent bench whistling at interested parties. One lady said "why don't you come to me, why whistle", "if I come to you the port police accuse me of assaulting you, you get my meaning". He was an interesting character and Mike and Michail found they had many things in common, born in the same year, having the same name and both being typical of their name "Angel Like", think this is the inflated ego of two Captains, blameless in all that occurs.
That night we knew bad weather was going to pass through, at about 04:00 we were woken by the winds, being conscious of our limited length of anchor chain Mike got up to see if all was ok. The crew off Arianna were also up tying additional lines to both the stern and across our bow and the trip boat to the quay wall; Mike tied a mid-ship line from Dream Catcher to the shed. He then decided we needed a line across the quay wall to provide additional stability to the shed. Getting onto the passerelle in the wind and swell was like watching Mike in "Ninja Warrior" making a run for it before ending up in the water. Eventually getting on board he secured a long line to the bow and threw it across to the adjacent ribs where he hoped to retrieve the line from. Once again he ran the plank and landed on dry land before making his way round the rib with its slightly deflated chambers, as the swell bounced the said boat around Mike managed again to jump on board and retrieve his long line. Getting off would not be easy with all this movement so he held onto the Bimini frame of the rib and had one foot on one rib and the other on another similar boat. It was at this point the boats began to go their separate ways with Mike in limbo doing the splits and washing his bum in the water at the same time, fortunately at which point they came back together much to the amusement of Arianna crew. 33 knots of wind whistled through the harbour that night.
Our plans for the following day (17th July) lay very much in the hands of Michail, if he was not going out we would have to remain due the anchor situation but if he did go we would be up and off before his return. Methina was to be our next port of call as it is reported to be a good safe shelter if you can tolerate smell of sulphur and further strong winds were forecast for the next few days. Mike had telephoned ahead to make sure there were berths available, which there were but they advised an arrival of 15:00 was necessary to secure one. We were poised and ready to depart, Michail had told us he was going at 12:30, but hey this is Greek time and there is talking to be done first. Once out of the harbour there was very little wind and despite Mikes attempt to sail the genoa had to be taken in. In the distance we could see some really dark clouds and rain, Mike laughed "ooh somebody has got some bad weather, let's hope we are moving faster than it is" As the sun shone down on us we watched a pod of Dolphins playing in the distance, at one point one of them flipped right up out the water, even from this distance he looked really big. Following us to our stern was another yacht obviously with very similar plans to us. By now we could see our destination so got the fenders and lines ready, as we clambered back into the cockpit Mike said "Oooh I felt a spot of rain". A spot of rain very quickly changed to torrential rain hitting us like constant buckets of water, winds blowing at 45 knots and a lack of visibility, our destination disappeared before our eyes. We were both soaked through with water passing through our clothes and running down our bodies. Whilst Mike tried to hold the boats position till the storm passed he struggled to see with his sun glasses on for protection from the vicious rain. I had the instruction of keeping an eye out for the other boat that was near us, I just hoped we were nowhere near each other. When in these situations what always feels like such a short period is an absolute eternity. The wind and rain did begin to settle and we were able to make our approach into the milky sulphur waters of Methina, by now we could see the other boat on our stern. There were very few spaces and despite the gap we spotted seeming a little tight Mike said I just want to get tied up, we lifted all our fenders and squeezed into the gap. The reports about this place tell you that you will not be provided with any help and will have to find your own spot but that at 18:00 somebody will come and take your money.
Tied up, wringing wet through and sun shining I went to offer some help to the other boat but they were stuck on their anchor, they had dropped it in a no anchoring area. I decided to leave them to it. Back on board we hung our clothes out and poured a glass of wine and chatted about our adventures, it was about 18:30 when we observed this small dark haired lady marching down the quay like a member of the Koreans People's Army, swinging her arms and shouting. "I have a problem with this boat, it is too big for this space, to tight, you have to go" with a shooing gesture as she turned heals and began to walk away with purpose. As with all Greeks it appears, she returned and repeated both the conversation and gestures, I sat in disbelief feeling the need to laugh. Mike apologised and said we would depart to the harbour across the way, at this point she said "How long are you staying?" Mike had already read about this lady, Marina (yes that's her name), had a problem with people who stayed for one night so declared we would wish to stay two nights "ok, I may have a berth for you, a bigger one follow me" as she moved us a couple of berths along. As we moved Mike declared he felt the need to give her a hug once we were in, I didn't quite see why but there you go. Once secured on our new mooring Mike went over and gave her a big hug, she appeared flustered by this but quickly composed herself and requested our ships papers. I handed Mike the wallet with all our documents in it and as he put his hand in she snatched the inner wallet, whipped out the Ships Registration document and with a turn of her heals said "I bring this back tomorrow, you stay two nights I charge you three", before marching off in her Korean fashion. We weren't brave enough to argue.

Passage through the Corinth canal

13 July 2017
12th July 2017 Sailing through the Corinth Canal.
Mike had told me it would be an early start the following day, with a 6 to 8 hour sail before we reach the Corinth Canal and then a rumoured maximum of 3 hours wait, there was no way we could afford to leave late. Knowing how I like my bed Mike said he would get up and set off leaving me to dream in the luxury of our double bed and all to myself. Getting up and off is not a quiet affair, engines started and size 9’s thudding centimetres above your head make sleeping even for the most proficient an impossibility. As I stuck my head up on deck daylight was barely breaking, it was 04:00, and all was quiet around us, we let the lines go and as quietly as possible made our exit from the harbour trying not to disturb others who were fast asleep. Despite it being early it was already warm and Mike was soon dropping his swimming trunks to get some air flow.
There was very little wind and a side swell made the journey a little uncomfortable, fortunately when we changed our direction at the headland the swell was more from the stern and made it a little better. As the auto pilot did its stuff we sat observing the activity around us, mmm, we are the only silly buggers up it would appear.
As I stared into the distance I saw something large jump out the water several times in a linear fashion. “Dolphins”, “where, are you sure ?” We both watched as they made their way along our starboard but at a distance. “It could be Tuna, if it is they won’t come to us” With that several Dolphins were making a B Line for the boat, I was instructed not to go on deck due to the swell but like every wife who promised to obey I did as I liked and clambered to the bow with my camera strapped to me. They put on another amazing display jumping out the water in pairs, swimming with the bow, flipping over so you could see their tummies and jumping out ahead of the boat. Well that was exciting. As we continued our journey this happened another twice but with different pods, how lucky are we.
The Corinth Canal does not operate to opening times and it is just pot luck how long you have to wait till it is your turn. The canal works on a one way system and road bridges have to be lowered into the water to allow passage of the 4.5K waterway carved through the rock. As we were getting near we could see some large boats hovering at the entrance, far behind us we could see the spray of a fast motor boat, Solaris, obviously in a rush to make the next passage through. Having no regard for us or the yacht on his other side he flew between us doing 29 knots, with no consideration for us or the discomfort his passage would be for us. Think “tosser” is the word.
We could see by the movement of the boats ahead we were not going to make this passage and just hoped and prayed it would be a quicker turn around than three hours. The protocol for the canal is quite strict and if you do not adhere to this you can end up with a substantial fine, overtaking in the canal is reported to attract a €700 fine on top of your passage charge. Mike radioed up and we were instructed to wait one mile off the entrance on the north side, the swell had picked up and we were merrily bouncing about in it in the company of Lulu V a large motor boat with its tender to its rear, the tender was longer in length than our boat. The control tower was communicating with boats at both the East and West entrances, with this and some confusion between names it was all quite amusing to listen to. We could hear one of the boats making its way through being instructed to go faster, you are expected to maintain 5 knots. After about an hour of hovering around it was our turn, Lulu V was instructed to make her way with the tender to her stern, followed by us and then a yacht called Seven. Out of the blue a yacht appeared and without any notification to the tower and pushed in front of Lulu V who was now shouting “There is a yacht in front of me” repeatedly and in panic, messages were shouted to the pilot boat to stop the yacht, the controllers ordered the yacht to stop but it carried on oblivious, hope he has his credit card with him !!
The idea of cutting a canal across the narrow waist connecting the Peloponnese to Attica was muted by the ancient Greeks and many who came after. The present canal was started by the French and completed by the Greeks in 1893. It is reputed to be the highest canal fee per mile in the world. The canal is 3.2 miles long and 25 meters wide. The water that leads you through is turquoise, and despite it being a choppy day in the entrance calm prevailed in the passage. Visitors stood on the bridges which towered up above our masts taking photographs, some apparently bungee jump. An hour to passage the canal and a charge of €177.
Once on the other side we needed to check the weather and decide where best to anchor, despite our desire for some sleep we agreed we needed to do another 4 hours sailing due the wind strength and lack of protection. We were both flagging and with the gentle bob of the boat I know my eyes were closing. Then all of a sudden the sound of the engine changed, dropping revs before increasing back up slightly. A vibration could be felt, all we could think was we had picked something up on our propeller. It was now 18:00 when we arrived at Korfos and dropped the anchor. Mike jumped in the water and retrieved an industrial type plastic bag from the propeller. As he swam to the back of the boat I saw a large brown shape moving around “Jellyfish” I shrieked, Mike moved quickly to get on board “oh no it’s a Turtle” panic over.

Sex and dogs and rock n roll, Bollywood doesn't sound right

05 July 2017
On the 14th May we departed the boat to fly home ready for the birth of my daughters first baby, something I definitely could not miss. Despite this being during the sailing season Mike was in agreement with the need for us to be at home. After seven weeks at home and the arrival of Maisie Grace it was once again time to head out back to Greece and the boat with promises of regular photo updates.
Much to our surprise she was relatively clean and needed just a quick hose down, a bit like us really, the temperature had certainly increased since our last time here. An average of 33 degrees and no escape makes it a bit like having a permanent hot sweat, I should know, but apparently Mike knows better than me about these things as he frequently reminds me he is on his third wife.
Our first stop was an anchorage we had visited prior to our departure, Ormos Varko, beautiful clear waters, goats on the beach, the jingle of the bells, tranquillity….. This time there was certainly more activity, the goats had been replaced with sunbathers, the three boats on anchor had become twenty plus and the nearest music to our ears was the Bollywood Music filling the bay from a couple of camper vans on the beach at night.
Once we had set our anchor and avoided the odd swimmer making their way out to sea, it was time for Mike to inspect the underside after her stationary period. “I have never seen her so bad in such a short space of time”, armed with his snorkel and an old Gym Membership card he went to set about scraping the growth of the bottom. Now I have previously had my knuckles duly wrapped when he has gone in the water and I have not kept an eye on him, not wishing to upset the Captain so early in our adventures I decided I would sit on the paddleboard and observe him from there, dangling my legs in the water was also very cooling. After about an hour both breath holding and using his dive tank the bottom was clean. “Have you been far ?” as he nodded at the paddle board, “no I have been keeping an eye on you”, “Me, I don’t need anybody to keep an eye on me, I can take care of myself in the water” They say women take some fathoming, men are no better. So no “thank you that’s nice of you darling”, but I did get something for my efforts, a sunburnt bloody back.
Later that evening a rib sailed into the bay with a blue light mounted, they approached a few boats before making their way to us. “can you move 50 meters out please” The wind had picked up and we did not relish the thought of having to reset the anchor. Whilst the police were about we all made movements to suggest we preparing to adjust our position but once they had departed we aborted our efforts and stayed in situ. Mike decided to dive in cut the anchor ball from the anchor so it would appear more convincing that we had moved if they returned, I didn’t quite get his logic but never mind he felt happier. Despite our plans to stay for a couple of days the forecast persuaded us to move to a safer mooring early the following morning.
Mike had read about a not so well known town quay we could go to called Astakos (Greek for Lobster, bit like my back) which provided free mooring, water and electric. We arrived early in the day so were fortunate to find a free berth we could use. Prior to our arrival we discussed the procedure for this “stern to” anchor mooring, something we still don’t feel we have mastered yet. I was instructed to not to free fall the anchor but to lay it using the remote until such a point we were a length away from the quay, I was to move to the stern to manage the lines whilst Mike using his £1 Chinese manufactured wireless remote to continue laying more chain out. At the due time I shouted over to you as I headed to the stern, “No go back, go back keep doing the chain”. Your thinking the cheap remote had failed, no just Mike changing his mind mid plan and making me look stupid, maybe that was his plan. On the plus side it all went quite well and a celebratory drink was had.
Astakos is a very pretty little place with traditional waterside Taverna’s, all of which were very busy on the evening. We ate our meal on board and sat and watched the Quay side entertainment, the local stray dogs seem to gather on an evening and put on a live sex show much to the disgust of young parents with children and the Taverna owners, looking very much like Manuel, chasing them off up the street clapping their hands and shooing them in-between serving Souvlaki to their patrons. No sooner was the plate on the table than the bedraggled Heinz 57’s re appeared to try to spread the love, grab any little titbit and improve on the 57 varieties. It may all be nature but someone really needs to teach them about size differentiation!!
After two nights of watching the live entertainment it was time to head off to Mesolongi, about a 6 hour sail. We made our way between the small islands and just as I was busy washing the smalls down below Mike shouted. “Dolphins…., or a bloody big fish, no Dolphins” I grabbed my camera and shot up onto deck to see two Dolphins swimming alongside the boat and jumping out the water. They swam ahead of us under us, were jumping out of the water just ahead of us, it was by far the best display we had seen.
Arriving in Mesolongi you have to head up a small canal, to the side you can see small houses on stilts called Pelades and looking like something out of SE Asia. There were no fisherman to be seen stood in water up to their knees raking for fish. Many have been sold as holiday homes and are now more fancy than the original.

I may be in the dog house but there are no hairs on me

21 April 2017
I had assumed my next blog would be about the Greek hospitality we had experienced by going to church 3 times in one week, being sprinkled with incense, feasting (a loose term) on liver and offal soup, followed by sheeps cheeks for tea at one in the morning, drinking Ouzo and Sprite for breakfast and intestines BBQd on a spit in the afternoon. These experiences seem so insignificant now in comparison to what happens next. Is there any wonder my insides were feeling a little delicate to say the least and that combined with rough seas and strong winds compounded my delicate state by making me feel a little sea sick.
After a sleepless night with the boat being bashed against the quay wall and Mike doing his best to fend it off with lines and fenders there was no other option than to depart our mooring in Poros and head round to Agy Efimena. We knew the wind and swell would not be in our favour so the earlier we could get off the better. As daylight began to break Mike woke me, "come on time to go". Daylight may be breaking but it still looked dark to me, I made my way to the toilet, the boat was bouncing about on its mooring and the traffic kept flying past the making their way to the ferry. Conscious of all the traffic about I decided not to put a light on and would use the toilet in the dark, like us ladies can. As I flushed the "electric" toilet I heard a tinkle on the bowl, no definitely not my tinkle. I could hear the macerator trying to make iron filings of what I could only assume was my tweezers that I had left laid by the sink, this is a toilet that you can't even put paper down. I quickly stopped the pump, the toilet door flew open, Mike had heard my industrial production line "what the hell was that?" "I think it was my tweezers". Both of us peering into either a half full (me being positive) or a half empty (Mike being negative) toilet bowl of dirty water. It was not possible to see the bottom of the toilet so I felt obliged to put my hand in and see if I could feel anything, yes they were there in one piece but unable to get them back up the small gap. With a small bowl I bailed out the toilet, Mike with his magnet on a rod was able to manipulate them around the gap and retrieve them. With a flush the toilet duly filled up, with a second flush it merely spun the water around the bowl and made a very strange noise. "Great, no toilet for 4 weeks, bloody electric toilets, we will be buggered if the pump has gone"
The electric toilet has always been an issue on the boat, it was my desire, my purchase and my earache whenever there is a problem. "Bloody electric toilets, manual ones are so much easier to sort" Well guess I was going to have to cross my legs for a while, our priority was to move before the weather got any worse. I quietly weathered the storm and took my turn at the helm.
Now for all you ladies, you know that moment when your husband buys you a present that he is highly delighted with and expects that you will feel the same! Instead it is a source of disappointment to you because it isn't a precious metal item or studded with precious jewels. Seeing my disappointment at the time of being given it Mike quickly stated "it is the deluxe model" like this made a difference, what is it I asked, examining the strangely shaped plastic tubing. A "shewee, I bought it because when the boat is out the water, you don't have to get up, get dressed and walk across the yard to the toilet in the night, you will need to stand in the shower and practice though so you don't drip". I never did practice but I did throw it in my bag to bring back to the boat. This implement means that a woman can like a man stand and wee in a bottle. Now I could appreciate the thoughtfulness of his gift.
After a quick sleep it was time to start dismantling the toilet, despite Mike saying there was little I could do I felt I had stand by his side and at least give him moral support, that way I wouldn't feel as bad even though it was an accident. There is a plus to my moral support, I, not being practically minded will read the instruction manuals, so when Mike says "How do you get to the motor?" I can explain what it suggests in the manual and fails to show you on utube.
Bit by bit the toilet was taken apart, I like a dutiful wife kept mopping up dirty water as it leaked onto the floor out of the tubes. The top and bottom of it was that the drive belt had torn. Time for a coffee and research on the internet about a replacement part. This resulted in me being back in the dog house when it appeared that you had to buy the whole unit at €359 just to replace the belt, the toilet only cost £400. Those immortal words "I am going to write a letter to Jabsco". We managed to find a temporary solution to the problem and with a bit of swearing managed to reassemble it. Screwed back into position Mike flicked the flush and said "oh darling" as water spilled out over his feet, he quickly realised he had not connected the pipes. Pipes connected he flushed it again, the bowl filled up, now for the test will it empty?, the second flush and the water whirled around the bowl but went nowhere, oh no, the seacock was closed, so third time lucky it worked, albeit a temporary fix. Think I may stick with my shewee wherever possible or visit a local tavern for a glass of wine to avail them of their toilet.

Vessel Name: Dream Catcher
Vessel Make/Model: Bavaria Ocean 38
Hailing Port: Kingston Upon Hull
Crew: Mike and Jacqui Gowland
About: Happily married when not mooring up (boaters will familiar with this problem)
Extra: We set sail from Hull on the 12th April 2015 with a plan to navigate our way around Europe with the sun on our backs. Lets see what adventures we can have on our way.
Social:
Dream Catcher's Photos - Main
Located in The Acropolis, is Hercules Odeon Theatre, Parthenon & Erechtheion. Happy 7th Wedding Anniversary.
20 Photos
Created 5 September 2017
Although this takes place regularly throughout the day on a Sunday at 11:00 it is the full ceremony with band and in traditional dress. The location is under Parliament and in front of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
13 Photos
Created 5 September 2017
Built in 3rd Century BC, seats 14000, and is the most perfect and renowned monument.
12 Photos
Created 14 August 2017
13 Photos
Created 27 July 2017
9 Photos
Created 22 July 2017
Infamous for its sulphur waters.
6 Photos
Created 18 July 2017
8 Photos
Created 12 July 2017
8 Photos
Created 11 July 2017
6 Photos
Created 10 July 2017
3 Photos
Created 9 July 2017
One of the largest cathedrals in the Balkans and where St Andreas was crucified. The silver casket is said to contain his cranium.
5 Photos
Created 7 July 2017
As you sail into Mesolongion up the canal you pass these fisherman's houses built on stilts, called Pelades. The fishermen could be seen up to their knees raking the water for shell fish. Many have been taken over as holiday homes and are grander than they were originally.
3 Photos
Created 5 July 2017
6 Photos
Created 18 April 2017
16 Photos
Created 8 November 2016
12 Photos
Created 7 October 2016
Met by Jill and Dave we had the pleasure of being taken around the island by car and spending time with some lovely locals. What a welcome to Greece.
16 Photos
Created 3 October 2016
126 Photos
Created 8 September 2016
A week around Rome.
37 Photos
Created 4 September 2016
13 Photos
Created 31 August 2016
15 Photos
Created 17 August 2016
Day 1 and we visited the palace, Rose Garden in memory of Princess Grace and Cathedral.
40 Photos
Created 12 August 2016
This is the summer residence of Beatrice Rothschild. She was attracted to the area because women were not allowed to gamble but in nearby Monaco there was no such restriction. Many artefacts in the house had once belonged to Marie Antoinette.
27 Photos
Created 11 August 2016
18 Photos
Created 9 August 2016
Just off the coast from Cannes is a small island occupied by 21 monks and has been since the 4th century. They are an order of silence and spend their time tending the grape vines and maiking wine to sell.
5 Photos
Created 7 August 2016
38 Photos
Created 6 August 2016
19 Photos
Created 2 August 2016
Short ferry crossing to the private island.
15 Photos
Created 31 July 2016
A quirky little place to stay. On route getting caught in a race was entertaining.
12 Photos
Created 31 July 2016
4 Photos
Created 31 July 2016
Couple of days in Marseille, enjoyed visiting the bar used in Love Actually.
22 Photos
Created 31 July 2016
10 Photos
Created 19 July 2016
Long day walking, thank goodness for the water fountain stream.
7 Photos
Created 19 July 2016
There are strong wind warnings for days so we decided to escape off the boat to nearby Nabbone.
17 Photos
Created 13 July 2016
7 Photos
Created 12 July 2016
Our last anchorage in Spain
19 Photos
Created 8 July 2016
10 Photos
Created 2 July 2016
My daughter and son in law came out to Barcelona for a week which allowed us to see many of the sights. Here are just a few.
34 Photos
Created 26 June 2016
A historical roman city with lots to see. The Cathedral was made so much more beautiful by the organist, Violin and female singer rehearsal.
19 Photos
Created 14 June 2016
Visited the Oceanografic, Cathedral, Palacio del Marques de Dos Aguas
34 Photos
Created 2 June 2016
It is custom for the locals to come down to the beach and beat the drums till sun has set each evening.
9 Photos
Created 28 May 2016
7 Photos
Created 21 May 2016
Anchored in the very posh first bay and due to weather moved to the quaint fishing shack bay.
6 Photos
Created 18 May 2016
14 Photos
Created 17 May 2016
Sunny day on anchor listening to the Ibiza music scene.
10 Photos
Created 15 May 2016
12 Photos
Created 25 April 2016
A day around the castle.
13 Photos
Created 11 April 2016
Lovely town and stunning Amphitheatre which was only discovered in 1989.
6 Photos
Created 4 April 2016
32 Photos
Created 30 March 2016
11 Photos
Created 30 March 2016
Easter Celebrations
10 Photos
Created 23 March 2016
Excellent tour with free samples
15 Photos
Created 23 March 2016
17 Photos
Created 22 March 2016
5 Photos
Created 20 March 2016
A day out in the mountains.
16 Photos
Created 18 March 2016
17 Photos
Created 15 March 2016
A glorious day topped off with some classical music in the sun.
10 Photos
Created 13 March 2016
Back sailing and in the sun.
7 Photos
Created 11 March 2016
Our time in Gibraltar, including the Caves, The Apes, Maureen Lipman, the Christmas light turn on and an evening on the Sunbourn
33 Photos
Created 19 November 2015
44 Photos
Created 9 November 2015
18 Photos
Created 5 November 2015
6 Photos
Created 27 October 2015
Looking across Cadiz from the Camera Obscure
8 Photos
Created 25 October 2015
8 Photos
Created 24 October 2015
Visiting Cadiz Cathedral
22 Photos
Created 23 October 2015
Behind the grandeur of the gold interior of the church you are led to a small chapel at the rear of the church, The chapel is lined with the skulls of thousands of monks, found in the graveyard. The Alter is also built from the humand remains.
10 Photos
Created 19 October 2015
13 Photos
Created 16 October 2015
Feeling a lot of love for Cliff Richard in this region, just had to sample the wine.
20 Photos
Created 13 October 2015
8 Photos
Created 7 October 2015
16 Photos
Created 4 October 2015
7 Photos
Created 2 October 2015
13 Photos
Created 29 August 2015
Our final marina before our flight home for the wedding.
3 Photos
Created 24 August 2015
3 Photos
Created 23 August 2015
The old capital of Portugal
14 Photos
Created 19 August 2015
11 Photos
Created 15 August 2015
11 Photos
Created 13 August 2015
16 Photos
Created 6 August 2015
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Created 4 August 2015
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Created 2 August 2015
17 Photos
Created 25 July 2015
3 Photos
Created 22 July 2015
4 Photos
Created 21 July 2015
9 Photos
Created 15 July 2015
5 Photos
Created 14 July 2015
9 Photos
Created 12 July 2015
6 Photos
Created 3 July 2015
4 Photos
Created 1 July 2015
9 Photos
Created 30 June 2015
5 Photos
Created 26 June 2015
5 Photos
Created 23 June 2015
11 Photos
Created 19 June 2015
8 Photos
Created 18 June 2015
5 Photos
Created 17 June 2015
Exotic gardens
5 Photos
Created 10 June 2015
4 Photos
Created 6 June 2015
3 Photos
Created 21 May 2015
6 Photos
Created 13 May 2015
3 Photos
Created 3 May 2015
2 Photos
Created 30 April 2015
A week in London sight seeing and watching the London Marathon.
12 Photos
Created 20 April 2015
3 Photos
Created 13 April 2015