Due West Adventures

The sailing adventures of Captain Kirk & Heidi, Tosh and Tikka Hackler . . .

02 November 2017 | Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
11 October 2017 | Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
16 September 2017 | Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
29 June 2017 | Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, MX
26 May 2017 | Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, MX
07 April 2017 | Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, MX
26 February 2017 | Puerto Vallarta, Jalisco, MX
30 January 2017 | La Cruz, Nayarit, MX
24 December 2016 | Banderas Bay, Mexico
20 December 2016 | Banderas Bay
27 November 2016 | La Paz, B.C.S. Mexico
14 November 2016 | Bahia San Carlos Mexico
17 October 2016 | San Carlos, Sonora, Mexico
30 September 2016 | San Javier, B.C.S.
25 September 2016 | Puerto Escondido, B.C.S Mexico
12 September 2016 | Puerto Escondido, B.C.S Mexico
04 September 2016 | Nopolo Norte - Loreto
12 August 2016 | La Paz, Baja California Sur

Dia de Los Muertos, Puerto Vallarta Style

02 November 2017 | Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
You can view more images from Dia de los Muertos in our Photo Gallery.

This is our third time experiencing Dia de los Muertos in Mexico, the first time was 20-years ago in Yucatan. Last year we were in San Carlos. This year in Puerto Vallarta was by far the best. You may be familiar with the face-painted Catrinas y Catrines, sugar skulls, and colorfully decorated altars...





In case you're not familiar with this Mexican tradition, here's a little background. The celebration of ancestral spirits has been a Mexican tradition dating back to to 3,000 B.C, pre-Mayan and Aztec days. When the Spanish Missionaries arrived in Mexico in the 1700's they tried to abolish this custom with out any success. So instead they incorporated some Catholic icons from All Souls Day, and today the Dia de Los Muertos celebration encompasses traditional indigenous customs along with a few Catholic ones sprinkled in. Each village, town, and city puts their own spin onto the celebrations, so you may experience different customs in different parts of Mexico.





As we learned, the traditional painted faces and sugar skulls are just a part of the Dia de Los Muertos celebrations. Graves and cemeteries are also decorated with bright orange, strongly-scented marigolds which help lead the spirits of the deceased ancestors back home for 24 hours of celebration each year on November 2nd. Family gatherings and parties to celebrate their ancestors include favorite foods and drinks of the deceased.





This is a HAPPY time to CELEBRATE LIFE, and is not a sad, mournful event. As it was explained "we are not sad that they are no longer with us, we are happy that they have come back to party with us for one night each year." The festival in Puerto Vallarta culminates in a parade from the cemetery to the Malecon.




No Tricks! We even got the Green Flash on Halloween night!

In other news, Kirk has recovered great from his latest pacemaker re-wiring, and we're currently visiting family in the states while friends Judy & Paul are taking care of Tosh & Tikka for us. We MISS our furbies! Stay tuned for another blog post soon about our road-trip Mexican style! In the mean time we'll be enjoying Banderas Bay this holiday season, so let us know if your'e coming to PV for the holidays, we'd love to see you!

xoxo

Check out lots more images from Dia de los Muertos in our Photo Gallery.
Vessel Name: Due West
Vessel Make/Model: Passport 40
Hailing Port: Seattle, WA
Crew: Captain Kirk & Heidi Hackler + Tosh & Tikka
About:
Captain Kirk grew up sailing on Lake Washington and has been boating his whole life. He has been racing sailboats for about 40 years, including two Vic-Maui races (from Victoria, BC to Maui, Hawaii), one in 1990, and the other on Due West in 1996. [...]
Extra:
You can see pix of our boat here: Due West Interior Photos and in the Photo Gallery. Our racing friends call us "The [...]
Home Page: http://svduewest.com
Due West's Photos - Isla Espirto Santo, Isla San Francisco & San Evaristo
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Map of our travels from La Paz to San Evaristo and back again. We did variations of this trip twice, once with the WWS (Women Who Sail) Rendezvous, and again with our Seattle friends Jared & Karen.
Bonanza Beach view from our kayaks, east side of Isla Espirto Santo, where we anchored for 3 days before arriving at La Paz (see previous post.) The first day we had the entire bay to ourselves, then each day more and more boats showed up, including 12 kayakers camping on the beach on our last day.
Due West anchored in Caleta Partida, though the water looks inviting, it was still a bit on the cool side (74°) and we saw quite a few jellies, so we weren
One of two fishing villages on the cut between Isla Partida (this village) and Isla Espirto Santo.
The second fishing village on the opposite bank from the first, is on Isla Espirto Santo. The cut between the islands is very shallow and can only be passed by dinghy at hight tide.
Kirk and Jared dinghying to the Sea Caves. The geology around here makes us feel like we
View of the ever-changing shoreline along Isla Espirto Santo on the way to the Sea Caves.
Another view looking south from the Sea Caves along the eastern shore of Isla Espirto Santo.
Entering into the Sea Caves on Isla Espirto Santo. The water is a magical neon-turquoise color.
Inside the Sea Caves on Isla Espirto Santo, looking out a "window" in the cave. We dinghied into the cave which was about 80
Looking up inside the Sea Caves, made of conglomerate rock...hoping for NO earthquakes while we were inside the caves.
Cormorant silhoutte looking out from inside the Sea Caves.
Seattle friends Karen & Roger on s/v Meridien dinghied over from the next cove to meet us in Caleta Partida in the shallow dinghy channel. So good to see them even for a few brief minutes.
Isla Espirto Santo National Park: The shoals of Caleta Partida Bay (in some places only 1-2
Heidi  and Jared, sailing to San Evaristo.
We saw several individual dolphins and one pod of about 10-12 Bottlenose dolphins which surfed our bow wake for several minutes of play. None of our photos were quite as good as this photo, courtesy of Heidi
Panoramic view of Isla San Francisco from the top of the ridge. This birds-eye view really shows the crater well. Photo courtesy of Jared Smith.
Heidi, Karen, and Captain Kirk getting ready to hike up the ridge on Isla San Francisco.
Due West anchored in picturesque Isla San Franciso, a former volcanic crater with white sand beaches and turquoise waters.  We are the white sailboat in the middle of the photo, next to a white powerboat.
Top of Isla San Francisco looking north-east down the coast. The rocks on this island are high in both iron (red) and copper (green) content.
Sunset over Isla San Francisco filled with WWS boats.
The first night of the WWS Rendezvous, prizes and fun times for all, including the few DH
Heidi and Seattle friend Teresa, on the WWS Rendezvous. We were happy to kid-nap Teresa off of her charter boat to come sail with us for a couple of days.
Cardón cactus in bloom on Isla San Jose. These larger cousins of the Suguaro cactus can grow to 70
Sea birds swarming the fishing boats in San Evaristo.
Lupe Sierra & Maggie Mae
Maggie Mae (right) and her daughter-in-law cooked amazing food for 65 people at the Women Who Sail Rendezvous. We took Jared & Karen back there the following week for another delicious meal. Fresh fish from the day
The BYOB (bring your own BOAT) crews at the WWS Rendezvous. So much fun to meet up with so many people that Heidi had previously known only on Facebook. Photo courtesy of Frankie Grant (far left).
Cows and goats hanging out in front of the San Evaristo "Mini-Super" Tienda. For a small town of 40 families, 5 hours drive from anywhere... this tienda actually had quite an amazing selection of food including fresh produce. Heidi asked the owner if she could take a photo inside the store, but she declined.
The "Mini-Super" tienda in the little fishing village of San Evaristo.
The dogs of San Evaristo with the Agua Purificada and Heilo Purificada plant in the background.
The Heilo Purificada (ice from purified water) was "bag-your-own" at 20 pesos (about $1.20 US) per kilo. Since we didn
Karen, Steve & Sherri from s/v Pablo, Heidi, and  Jared on the beach in San Evaristo. Here you can see "Aventuras
"Aventuras" our dinghy sporting her new dinghy chaps (gray sumbrella cover); art-board motor; and new dinghy-wheels in the UP position. These dinghy wheels help us to "drive" the dinghy up the beach, away from the surf and rising tide.
Signs on the beach "Shuffle, shuffle, shuffle your feet" as you get in and out of the dinghy at the water
The crazy antics of these Mabula Rays (a type of smaller manta ray) kept us entertained on several occasions. Again, Heidi
Jared, who used to be allergic to cats, declared Tosh & Tikka to be "hypoallergenic" and got some cute shots of them as they played with him each morning... nothing like having your cats wake up your guests at 0500 to PLAY!
Tosh & Tikka chilaxin on the main traveler, at anchor.
Karen, Jared, and Kirk hanging in the cockpit.
Mix-master Jared Smith making our nightly margaritas with fresh limes, tequila, and "Controy"! They were delish!
As we returned to La Paz, we passed our new South Korean friend, Moon on s/v Adele. We first met Moon in Ensenada several months ago. Now he was leaving on his single-handed voyage back to South Korea, via Hawaii! We wished him fair winds and following seas, and will be eager to hear from him when he next gets internet access.
 
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