Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
22 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
22 August 2016 | b
22 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
14 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
13 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
07 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
31 July 2016 | Rock Hall, Eastern Shore
28 July 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
26 July 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
14 July 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
11 July 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
04 July 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
30 June 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
29 June 2016 | St. Mary's, GA
Recent Blog Posts
22 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay

Webb hits Agulhas

I always check into Webb Chiles yellow brick position track to see how he is going. It gives his track, lat and long, course and speed, also there is an indication of the wind direction. I was surprised to see him suddenly begin to track to the NE when he was nearly at Durban, did he change his mind [...]

22 August 2016 | b

Yachtwin Thug

OK, it wasn’t a Yachmaster, it is called “Yachtwin”, a thug of an outboard motor. It weighs about 80 lbs. and is a detuned 15 HP motor. This photo is off the internet, but I can’t credit it properly.

22 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay

Pig in a Poke

The message was that the proa model looked crude. It is. The leeboard and cassettes were hastily drawn and constructed and probably look nothing like the full size build. Having two boards in the water is probably not necessary or the best configuration, but it saves having to move the leeboard from [...]

15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay

Going the Other Way

Here is the proa model going from right to left. The leeboards pivot backwards to the right.

15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay

Leeboards Installed

Here is the proa model with the leeboards attached. The model would be going from left to right and the leeboards are trailing back to the left. The cassettes pivot on a pin that passes through the end of the crossbeam, down through the cassette, and down into an additional beam just above the waterline. This beam passes through this side of the hull and fastens to the other hull side. It can be used for lashing the crossbeam which is directly above it. The model is using rubber bands to hold the leeboard in place. A full size installation would use bungees or bicycle inner tubes. Also the cassette and leeboard would be notched to hold the bungee in place. We haven’t added a tiller yet. The aft leeboard would function like a rudder and the forward one would function like a ... leeboard.

15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay

Leeboard and Cassette

Here is a leeboard and the cassette. The leeboard fits into the cassette which has a slot created by plywood cheeks glued onto both sides of the cassette insert.

Webb hits Agulhas

22 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/Mild Summer
I always check into Webb Chiles yellow brick position track to see how he is going. It gives his track, lat and long, course and speed, also there is an indication of the wind direction. I was surprised to see him suddenly begin to track to the NE when he was nearly at Durban, did he change his mind and head up to Richards Bay? His speed was under 2 knots. Most peculiar.
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I took a look at the African coast at passageweather.com and saw the image that is posted here. The orange blotches are 30-35 knots and the red horizontal slash is Webb’s approximate approach to the coast. The prevailing current here is the Agulhas which flows down the coast directly opposite these gale winds. This must be making a terrible sea state. He is probably lying ahull. If he can hold out a day or so the winds will abate.

Yachtwin Thug

22 August 2016 | b
Capn Andy/Thunderstorms
OK, it wasn’t a Yachmaster, it is called “Yachtwin”, a thug of an outboard motor. It weighs about 80 lbs. and is a detuned 15 HP motor. This photo is off the internet, but I can’t credit it properly.
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There is the possibility of un-detuning the motor by putting a 15 HP carburetor on it. This works well if you are running at highest RPM’s, because that’s where the increased power comes from. On a sailboat that maxes out at about 6.4 knots, a high torque output and large prop will work best, so this motor should stay as it is.

Pig in a Poke

22 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/Thunderstorms
The message was that the proa model looked crude. It is. The leeboard and cassettes were hastily drawn and constructed and probably look nothing like the full size build. Having two boards in the water is probably not necessary or the best configuration, but it saves having to move the leeboard from one end of the boat to the other. The center of effort of the two sails falls near or slightly forward of the rear crossbeam. Thus, only a leeboard there is necessary and optimal. Removing the board from the cassette and moving it to the other cassette would be a real pain if you were tacking up a narrow channel. Perhaps the two board could be used for short tacks and when you head out on a long leg you can remove the forward board. There is also a need to configure the board so that it can be secured in the cassette at different depths like having a dagger board only halfway down in its case.
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The question was where to find the designs of O. Gulbrandsen. I ran across links to them while visiting the tacking-outriggers website, which is easy to find online. The designs are on the FAO website downloadable as pdf files.
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The forecast down in Georgia shows a break in the summer heat during the last week of August, so we have to organize the return to Kaimu in the boatyard down there.
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I had tried for 2 days to start the loaner outboard, Johnson 9.9 two stroke, on the little C&C 24 with no luck. Captain Ed came down from Pennsylvania to reclaim the engine. I had wanted to sell him the boat, but he said he had to pass on it. We went out to the boat and the engine started first pull, by him. Then he took it away. I have to put this little boat up on the hard, since I might not be back in time to move it when winter sets in.
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I showed the little boat to an interested party, but they found outboard motor prices, that is for ones with a warranty and electric start, too prohibitive. While I had the boat at the dock to show I decided to take it out for a sail. The weather was hot but beautiful with a light easterly breeze intermittently drifting in, sometimes from the Northeast, sometimes from the Southeast. There were tons of boats out on the Bodkin, rafted together, playing music, and enjoying a day of hot, but not too hot, weather. By the time I made it to the bay the wind had petered out. I caught the last of it to turn back and then drifted for about 3 hours to cover the mile back to the mooring. After putting things away I weighed myself back at the cottage. I had lost 6 pounds according to the scale.
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Actually, while folding up the 150 light weight genoa which was drying on the dock, dehydration hit me pretty hard and I took a rest by laying down in the shade at the foot of the dock. I could see a lot of birds up above including an osprey and a buzzard. There were smaller birds with a familiar profile, the swallows of the Bodkin, a zillion of them, zooming around, eating up all the bugs. Some may have grown up in the nests under the cross deck of Kaimu over the past few summers.
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A fellow posted an Evinrude 9.9 Yachtmaster with electric start on Craig’s List and I got him to agree over the phone for $225 for it. This is a similar motor to the Johnson 9.9 that Captain Ed had for us, but the Evinrude has electric start and the high thrust of the Yachmaster series. They use a larger propeller designed to give more thrust at lower speeds. Kaimu’s Yamaha T50 is also a high thrust design. It matches the engine power peak with the boat’s operating speeds. The only problem with this Yachmaster is that it is a pig in a poke, the seller could not mount it on his dinghy or in his engine well on his sailboat, so he had only been able to verify that the ignition had spark, he didn’t want to run it without it being in the water to keep the cylinders cool. Good decision. These two stroke motors are relatively simple with a few basic functions that have to work for the engine to run.
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A good resource for these motors is http://www.leeroysramblings.com/ . This is practical hands on knowledge along with some engineering expertise. If I had any of the OMC outboards, I would go to this site and look up my particular model number and read all about it.
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The electric start engine turned out to be quite heavy and I could see why the seller couldn’t mount it on a dinghy and why it didn’t fit in his engine well. I had talked him down in price over the phone and took advantage of him due to excessive drink. When I showed up the next day and gave him the cash, he dove into the pub across the street with his dog. It was Sunday morning.
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When I searched saatchiart.com for “sunday pub” the posted image showed up,
painted by Atta Bidarbakht of the UK, it is available for purchase.

Going the Other Way

15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/Mild Summer
Here is the proa model going from right to left. The leeboards pivot backwards to the right.

Leeboards Installed

15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/Mild Summer
Here is the proa model with the leeboards attached. The model would be going from left to right and the leeboards are trailing back to the left. The cassettes pivot on a pin that passes through the end of the crossbeam, down through the cassette, and down into an additional beam just above the waterline. This beam passes through this side of the hull and fastens to the other hull side. It can be used for lashing the crossbeam which is directly above it. The model is using rubber bands to hold the leeboard in place. A full size installation would use bungees or bicycle inner tubes. Also the cassette and leeboard would be notched to hold the bungee in place. We haven’t added a tiller yet. The aft leeboard would function like a rudder and the forward one would function like a ... leeboard.

Leeboard and Cassette

15 August 2016 | Bodkin Inlet, Chesapeake Bay
Capn Andy/Mild Summer
Here is a leeboard and the cassette. The leeboard fits into the cassette which has a slot created by plywood cheeks glued onto both sides of the cassette insert.
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