Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
03 December 2016 | St. Marys, GA
03 December 2016 | St. Marys, GA
28 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
24 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
24 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
23 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
23 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
20 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
15 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
12 November 2016 | Charleston, SC
12 November 2016 | Charleston, SC
12 November 2016 | Charleston, SC
11 November 2016 | Charleston, SC
07 November 2016 | Dowry Creek, NC
05 November 2016 | Willoughby Bay, Norfolk, Virginia
31 October 2016 | St. Marys, GA
26 October 2016 | St. Marys, GA
16 October 2016 | St. Marys, GA
13 October 2016 | St. Marys, GA
Recent Blog Posts
03 December 2016 | St. Marys, GA

Bonhomme Richard pt. II

I promised to blog about Richard’s catamaran dinghy as he builds it, so here is post number two. He has made the second hull and here you can see him measuring the fit where the aft crossbeam is installed.

03 December 2016 | St. Marys, GA

Solar Panelology

Work continued on the new solar panel installation. After the old winches, rope clutches, and solar panel mounts were removed from the cabin tops, the empty bolt holes were puttied with epoxy thickened with microballoons and a little colloidal silica, maybe 4:1. First the holes were plugged inside [...]

28 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA

Radio

When I saw the Wharram Pahi 63 in St. Marys Harbor, I thought it would be easy to get in touch with the crew. It turned out to be impossible. No one knew who they were and several people I asked said that they would like to know the Wharram crew also. Mary, the organizer of the St. Marys Thanksgiving [...]

24 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA

More St. Marys

There was a request for a shot of St. Marys harbor during the Thanksgiving feast, so here it is.

24 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA

St. Marys Thanksgiving for Boaters

There was a contingent of boaters from the boatyard signed up to attend the Oyster Roast at the town of St. Marys Thanksgiving Festival. We had to bring an appetizer, not chips, they said. I decided to make potato salad which had gone over well at other parties. This was egg and potato salad with [...]

23 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA

Happy Thanksgiving, Jakob

Jakob has got himself a free boat. There is no such thing as a free boat, your expenses start the moment you take possession. Jakob has obtained an older steel yawl named Windler (I think) that had sat in the boatyard for a long time. The steel hull needed a lot of preparation and paint, and the spars [...]

Bonhomme Richard pt. II

03 December 2016 | St. Marys, GA
Capn Andy/Cold Fall Weather
I promised to blog about Richard’s catamaran dinghy as he builds it, so here is post number two. He has made the second hull and here you can see him measuring the fit where the aft crossbeam is installed.
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The second hull is a mirror image of the first hull and both hulls have their inboard gunwale relieved for a cross deck that serves as a sort of saddle-seat. Also the foredeck goes almost to the bows to allow access onto the boat there. The outboard motor will mount on the rear crossbeam.
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As with all DIY boats, the glassing, fairing, and painting of the boat takes up the most time. That is still to come.

Solar Panelology

03 December 2016 | St. Marys, GA
Capn Andy/Cold Fall Weather
Work continued on the new solar panel installation. After the old winches, rope clutches, and solar panel mounts were removed from the cabin tops, the empty bolt holes were puttied with epoxy thickened with microballoons and a little colloidal silica, maybe 4:1. First the holes were plugged inside the cabins with the mixture, then they were filled from above after the first batch had firmed up.
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Next the new solar panels with brackets were placed in their approximate positions above the 4 hatches. Then the position of the hole in the cabin top for the wire chase was marked. Consideration had to be made for routing the solar wiring inside the cabins. I had purchased 4 plumbing fittings from Lowe's that consisted of about 4 inches of straight pipe and then the rest was like bellows. You could bend the bellowed section almost 180 degrees. I glued these into the cabin tops into the 4 wire chase holes with the bellows section above the cabin top. The wiring would follow this "gooseneck" into the cabins. Later the goosenecks would be filled with expanding foam to keep insects from turning the cabins into beehives.
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I began to plan the battery part of the installation, where to mount the solar charge controllers, which were the original Sunsei 25 amp PWM controllers, and the monitor panels that read out battery voltage and charge current. My plan to add additional batteries might have to wait so that installation could begin right away.
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In the starboard hull the batteries are under the outboard dinette bench seat, which had its internal shelf lowered to allow the batteries headroom. To add more batteries, which would go under the inboard dinette bench seat, that shelf would also have to be lowered and I didn't want to start that job yet.
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In the port hull the batteries are under the full sized bunk in the middle of the hull. They are mounted in a shelf on the outboard side and there is room in the shelf for two more batteries. The problem with this installation is that it is difficult to access the tops of the batteries to service them when they need water. I had to use a mirror. Now we were going to chop apart the full sized bunk which runs athwartship leaving just the head and foot of the bunk remaining as counters. My plan is to cut out a hatch in the counter over the batteries, allowing access to them for service. The center section of the bunk that was removed will be retained so that the bunk can be put back together when needed to sleep visitors.
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The cabin tops were covered with a plastic drop cloth to prevent the heavy dew that had made the cabins very wet every morning. The job now was to refinish them using the belt sander, then apply epoxy fairing compound, then paint, then bolt on the solar panels, and run the solar wiring down into the cabins.
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For some reason I wanted to try out the crimping tool on the solar connectors. These were MP3 connectors that I had researched to mate with the existing connectors on the solar panels. It didn't look like they would fit, so I had been using the one solar panel as a test with clip leads and Walmart cheap electric cords to the charge controller. Now I tried crimping a connector. I call this kink of crimper a "butterfly" crimper. It was nearly impossible to get the shell of the connector on the cable or get the cable and pin into the connector body. The trick was to use a shot of WD-40 to lubricate things. It went together easily then. The first crimp I tried was very difficult, I was using the 4mm setting, which was what these PV cables were supposed to be. Next I found 6mm setting to work much more easily and still produced an acceptable crimp.
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The cables and connectors were tested and it turned out they were compatible with the existing connectors on the solar panels, so I didn't need as many connectors as I had ordered. The panels were sitting on top of the cabin and cables were made up to run to the charge controller, only they weren't cinched down permanently. The monitor said we were making 7.6 amps and the sun was nearly setting. This was looking good.
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The next morning the monitor was saying .7 amps and the sun wasn't even up yet. Then when it rose we had the batteries running up to 14.4 volts as the controller ran them through the equalization phase, they were fully charged. It was not yet noon. Later the charge would be about 2 amps, a trickle charge, with the batteries at 13.5 volts. Not too bad.
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In the port hull the full size athwartship bunk was chopped out to make a 5 foot counter on each side of the hull with a 2 foot wide aisle between them. The chopped out piece was sized to fit on top of one of the counters. Ultimately it will be possible to drop it back into position, making a full size berth again when needed.
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The starboard cabin top was belt sanded, then loose sheathing was ground away with a 36 grit flap wheel on the angle grinder. The technique is to sand toward the sheathing edge, which will peel away if it isn't adhering, until it doesn't peel away. Then the bare wood substrate is primed with epoxy and then can be glassed with new glass or coated with thickened epoxy.
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One spot was soft and the soft wood was ground out with the angle grinder with a chainsaw blade, then ply was cut to a nominal 1' square and placed over the bad area. The perimeter of the ply was cut using the multitool with halfmoon blade and straight blade for the corners. The bad area was then removed from the foam core of the cabin top. This is one of the advantages of foam core ply construction. If either side of the composite structure deteriorates, it can be removed and replaced in an individual patch.
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The photo is of the plywood patch glued in place with epoxy and weighted down with a type 24 deep cycle battery to clamp it together.

Radio

28 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
Capn Andy/Cold Fall Weather
When I saw the Wharram Pahi 63 in St. Marys Harbor, I thought it would be easy to get in touch with the crew. It turned out to be impossible. No one knew who they were and several people I asked said that they would like to know the Wharram crew also. Mary, the organizer of the St. Marys Thanksgiving Feast, suggested I call them on VHF channel 69, since that was the channel everybody was using in the harbor for the Thanksgiving gathering.
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I looked around for my handheld VHF and it wasn’t in the place I expected it, the counter under the inboard cabinet in the galley. I looked through the pilothouse, which is now chock full of tool boxes, it wasn’t there, nor did I expect it to be there. Maybe the chartroom, which had some of the navigation electronics sitting in it. No, not there. I checked the work tables under the boat. Sometimes I put things there when I am in a hurry and cover them with one of the tarps so that they don’t get ruined when it rains. Things do pile up there. No, not there.
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I kayaked out to Trillium, in the North River, and looked around in the cabin. I still have a lot of gear on board, some in boxes, some clothing in plastic bags, not very well organized. No, not there.
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The weekend came and went and the boats in St. Marys went also. My opportunity was gone. I still wanted to find my radio, though, and continued searching. Now I went through all the places I had already searched one more time, more thoroughly. It didn’t turn up.
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I tried to remember if I indeed had the radio with me during the hurricane, after bringing Trillium down from the Chesapeake. I used the radio on Trillium a lot. I was pretty sure I had the radio ashore when the hurricane hit, to listen to the NOAA weather reports. I thought of contacting Kristian who had been with me during the hurricane, he would know if I was using the radio then.
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I began asking around the yard, did anyone find a handheld VHF radio, with the implication that someone had a “finders keepers losers weepers” moment. One of the yardbirds asked did I look in my car. Then I remembered during the hurricane, the hardtop on the Miata was smashed by a tree limb and I had to go out in the rain and remove the hardtop and raise the convertible top. I looked in the car and the radio wasn’t there. Then I remembered we climbed aboard one of the yachts whose roller furled jib was starting to unfurl, and we secured it. Maybe I put my radio down while I was aboard. I took a ladder over to the boat and climbed aboard. The radio wasn’t there. The boatyard frowns on people climbing aboard others boats, so I had to do this discretely.
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Maybe I should go out to Trillium again and give it a more thorough search. I also thought it was a good chance to bring a tape measure down to the kayak and measure its beam width. I was considering building a wood kayak to plans, but I didn’t want to build it if it was narrower than the plastic kayak I was using.
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Now I was looking around for the tape measure. Let’s see, I was using it to measure inside the galley to drill the hole for the solar panel wires. It wasn’t there. But the radio was, hidden under a package of hand soap.
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The image is a photo by Vikram Kushwah, titled “The Owl and the Radio”. It is available for purchase at saatchiart.com.

More St. Marys

24 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
Capn Andy/Cold Fall Weather
There was a request for a shot of St. Marys harbor during the Thanksgiving feast, so here it is.

St. Marys Thanksgiving for Boaters

24 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
Capn Andy/Cold Fall Weather
There was a contingent of boaters from the boatyard signed up to attend the Oyster Roast at the town of St. Marys Thanksgiving Festival. We had to bring an appetizer, not chips, they said. I decided to make potato salad which had gone over well at other parties. This was egg and potato salad with some bacon and green onions. Now I had the idea to make a loaded potato salad, put some cheese into it.
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I needed to shop for ingredients, but first there was boatwork to do, epoxy all the holes I had made in the cabin tops when I removed the old solar panels, winches, and rope clutches. It seemed like the day was shot, I did the work, but time went by, I took Jakob out on my shopping trip for potatoes, etc. By the time we got back it was only about an hour before the Oyster Roast was to start and I had to cook 5 lbs. of potatoes and all the rest. Jacob was making some sort of lemon finger dessert over at the communal kitchen.
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I set up the Harbor Freight two burner propane cook top on top of the cast off cabinet that I was using to house my epoxy. This was too high to see what was happening in the pots as the eggs and potatoes were cooking.
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I guess I ought to include the recipe of what I was making, a variation on potato salad. I had some good feedback on a potato salad I made for a dock party that included eggs and bacon. Now I wanted to include cheese as well, a loaded baked potato salad.
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This would be a dozen hard boiled eggs, 5 lbs, of diced potatoes, one diced onion and one diced green pepper. I added about a quarter pound of diced black forest ham, because it was near its due date and had to be used. If I had used bacon I would have used Canadian bacon, and not fried to a crisp. With regular bacon, it is best to fry it under cover and maybe with some water to make it leathery, not crispy. In a salad, the crispy bacon can be an irritant, like sand. I used mayo and some mustard along with black pepper for seasoning. One comment was about using salt, but I added a package of shredded cheese, which is salty.
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The eggs got a boil, then 15 minutes rest in the hot water. At the same time, the diced potatoes were cooking and tested at the end and were well done by then. They were both drained, eggs put into cold water, potatoes given the shredded cheese, mixed while hot, then diced onion and green pepper, continue mixing, add diced ham (or bacon), then chop the hard boiled eggs fine and add them, mix with mayonnaise and a little mustard. Don’t forget some black pepper and salt to taste.
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We were running late, the Oyster Roast was scheduled at 5:30 and we were not going to be there before 6:30. We set off and got there about an hour late. Jakob was the designated driver and I ordered a large drink at the bar. We put our potato salad and lemon bars on the food table and began to mingle. I had a small plate and dropped a dab of my potato salad on it. I had not tasted it yet, plus, it had been made mostly after sundown with no light, made in the dark. I described it as a shot in the dark. It was good, with crunchy onion and green pepper. When I returned to have some more, it was all gone. Also Jakob’s lemon fingers were gone. Good cooking from the boatyard.
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It was nice to run into fellow boaters and discuss things that only we would care about. One objective for me was to find out who had the large 63 foot Wharram catamarn out in the harbor, surely they must be at this party or someone here must know who they are, but it turned out that no one knew who they were.
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The next day was of course Thanksgiving and we went back for the feast. It was four large banquet tables crowded with all sorts of food. I never had pomegranate salad before. Cherry, pumpkin, and lemon meringue pie for me for dessert.
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The photo is of Seagle’s, the restaurant that hosted the Thanksgiving feast.

Happy Thanksgiving, Jakob

23 November 2016 | St. Marys, GA
Capn Andy/Cold Fall Weather
Jakob has got himself a free boat. There is no such thing as a free boat, your expenses start the moment you take possession. Jakob has obtained an older steel yawl named Windler (I think) that had sat in the boatyard for a long time. The steel hull needed a lot of preparation and paint, and the spars are wood and had been unmaintained while the boat was in the yard.
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Here Jakob is gluing the mast back together after separating the planks which had come apart due to aged glue line failing. He cleaned up the mast which had remarkably no rot and epoxied it back together, using a zillion clamps borrowed from all over the boatyard.
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