Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
25 May 2017 | st marys, ga
17 May 2017 | st marys, ga
15 May 2017 | st marys, ga
15 May 2017 | st marys, ga
13 May 2017 | st marys, ga
13 May 2017 | st marys, ga
13 May 2017 | st marys, ga
07 May 2017 | St. Marys, GA
07 May 2017 | St. Marys, GA
27 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
26 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
24 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
24 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
23 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
20 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
19 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
18 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
16 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
14 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
13 April 2017 | St. Marys, GA
Recent Blog Posts
25 May 2017 | st marys, ga

Rig, Rain, Rearrangement

The mast work was almost done. The starboard upper shroud was removed and two 3/8" nylon thimbles were lashed with 7 strands of dynema 6 inches apart. One thimble was pinned to the tang on the mast, the other thimble had been carefully split at the teardrop end and fitted over the eye at the top end [...]

17 May 2017 | st marys, ga

Mo' Riggin'

The lack of internet in the boatyard makes ordering parts particularly difficult. The Google Chrome browser on my phone wants to autocomplete entries, but it goofs up, and shipping address becomes billing address. All the entries have to be painstakingly typed in on the little phone virtual keyboard [...]

15 May 2017 | st marys, ga

Catamaran Sophie's Launch

Here’s a link to photos of the launch of catamaran “Sophie” at St Marys Boat Services:

15 May 2017 | st marys, ga

Rigging

With the topsides painting completed work could commence on the rig. The chainplates were reattached to the hulls and now fittings for the stays had to be sussed out. The lashings of the past will be no more, I will be going back to turnbuckles with only lashings on one upper shroud to isolate it from [...]

13 May 2017 | st marys, ga

Chainplates

The punch list for getting the rig ready to restep the mast included torquing down the beam mounting bolts and installing the chainplates. It was important to check the beam mounting bolts because the rig pulls on the hulls and if the bolts are loose the hulls can become canted. Some of the rigging [...]

13 May 2017 | st marys, ga

Fairing and Painting Complete

The internet is still down in the boatyard, so posting the blog requires a ten mile drive for free wifi at Walmart, or at one of the lunch spots.

Hoist!

12 January 2017 | St. Marys, GA
Capn Andy/Winter
The musical chairs game of laptop computers continues. The “new” toughbook had a display problem. At first it looked great, much brighter than the old laptop. I had already loaded the ubuntu operating system on it and OpenCPN with its navigation charts. Then came Calibre and the ebook collection that is labeled “400000 books”. There are less than that in it, but it takes a long time for the program to load them into its database. After 2 days of churning along it was indicating about 47,000 books loaded. The display was going bad with the lower portion out of sync and it kept growing.
.
I had an old broken CF-52 toughbook display that I took apart to familiarize with its parts. Then I took apart the new display. I was guessing that the problem was a bad or loose cable. When I had it almost all apart and powered up, I could not make the problem go away by wiggling the cables. Then the LCD part of the display fell out of its case and tore a small ribbon cable apart.
.
I found out after a lot of searching around that this display is an LED backlit display while the earlier ones are cold cathode fluorescent. The LED display is much brighter. In our case, we have no spare parts for it, so a new display was on order.
.
During this time I was using the windows laptop and the older navigatrix toughbook. I had blog posts partially written up here and there. Perhaps this one will survive and be posted.
.
The painting on the port side outboard cabin top and port side rear deck and coaming continued. I was down to the last quart of arctic white, so ordered another gallon. About 100 dollars including shipping from NJ.
.
We were having a cycle of 2 or 3 days of cold weather going down into the 30‘s at night and only in the 40‘s or 50‘s daytime, then 4 or 5 days of 70‘s daytime. My plan was to continue working on the outside of the boat during the warm days and work inside during the cold days. Inside work included doing laundry, breaking computers, and reading the kindle. I would have to start doing some real work inside and we will probably have more cold weather more days in a row in which to do it.
.
The next day was warm with a beautiful blue sky, so I goofed off and kayaked out to Trillium. I hadn’t been out there for a while. I was shocked to see about a foot of water in the cockpit. Another few inches and it would have been over the sill and into the cabin. The cockpit drains had been clogged and we had had a lot of rain. I cleaned the drains, they drained, and I grabbed the spare tiller arm, the Miata service manual, and a plastic jug of fuel, and kayaked back to shore. The kayak is not large and it is normally tortuous for me to get in and out of it. This time I tweaked something in my sore knee, and now it had regressed to the stiffness and pain level back when I injured it.
.
Back in the boatyard I ran into my neighbor Bill who needed to go shopping, so we took the Miata out for lunch and shopping. The day before, I found the car wouldn’t start. The battery terminals were loose. Then I remembered one of my dock neighbors up in Maryland telling me that Captain Ed had borrowed my battery, without asking, while I was away sailing Trillium down to St. Marys. He never said thank you or mentioned having borrowed it.
.
It turned out he had really messed up the battery terminals, that’s why he didn’t mention it. The car ran, but every now and then it would be hard to start. I was thinking of buying a new battery. It ended up that I had to completely remove the battery from the car and ungall one of the terminal bolts, find a new nut for the bolt, then reassemble the terminals and install the battery clamp, which he had left in pieces next to the battery.
.
Back from shopping and the boat next door was getting some work done. I believe they were working on an electrical problem, found the wiring of the boat mystifying, and were up the mast to ohm out the line that fed the steaming light. The crane that hoisted the rigger up the mast is called a man lift and was recently salvaged by the boatyard and put into service. It obviously needs a coat of paint. I am sure it is perfectly safe.
Comments
Gallery Error: Unknown Album [1:]:6137
Kaimu's Photos -

About & Links

SailBlogs Groups