Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
20 October 2017 | St Lucia
20 October 2017 | St Lucia
18 October 2017 | St Marys, GA
16 October 2017 | St Marys, GA
12 October 2017 | st marys, ga
12 October 2017 | Ft. Lauderdale, FL
12 October 2017 | St. Augustine, FL
08 October 2017 | Jacksonville Beach, FL
08 October 2017 | Jacksonville Beach, FL
08 October 2017 | Jacksonville Beach, FL
05 October 2017 | Oriental, NC
03 October 2017 | St Marys, GA
02 October 2017 | St Marys, GA
28 September 2017 | St Marys, GA
23 September 2017 | st marys, ga
17 September 2017 | st marys, ga
14 September 2017 | st marys, ga
12 September 2017 | St Marys, GA
10 September 2017 | st marys, ga
09 September 2017 | st marys, ga
Recent Blog Posts
20 October 2017 | St Lucia

Preparations in Rodney Bay

The next day was further preparations, the mainsail was sorted out, hoisted, first reef tied in, and then the sail was set with the reef. We left the reef tied in and lowered the sail into the stack pack. Forecast is for 15 to 20, but we will go with the reef in the sail even it the wind is a bit lower, [...]

20 October 2017 | St Lucia

St. Lucia SPOT

Early morning flight from Jacksonville to Miami with a 2 hour layover for breakfast, then a flight to St. Lucia to join the yacht, a Beneteau 50, not sure which specific model yet. They are all about the same, the ex-charter 50‘s, the Oceanis 50 and Beneteau 50. The charter boats have 4 double staterooms [...]

18 October 2017 | St Marys, GA

The St. Lucia Part

Now I am back on the other CF-C1. The cell phone has been recharged. It has grown dark, a little bit earlier each day this time of year, and there is a flash of lightning. A cold front is coming down from the NW, but it is spotty, gaps between thundercells.

16 October 2017 | St Marys, GA

The Flogging Continues

The next day after our return from Ft. Lauderdale was a day of laundry, picking up shipments at the boatyard office, and a trip to Luigi’s, a local pizza restaurant, for lunch, and all you can eat Italian buffet. After that I shopped to get groceries, prior to the delivery I tried to use up any perishable [...]

12 October 2017 | st marys, ga

The Album Part

https://www.flickr.com/photos/8728395@N03/albums/72157689375617206

12 October 2017 | Ft. Lauderdale, FL

The Ft. Lauderdale Part

I am on watch now, the early morning 2 AM watch. We are motoring into an 8 knot SE wind with lumpy seas. Our ETA to the mark off Cape Canaveral is 7:30 AM. I have coffee and cookies, the last 6 soggy Keeblers. Dinner earlier had been a prepackaged salad to which I added 6 slices (slabs) of bacon, [...]

Chainplates

13 May 2017 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/Warm Spring
The punch list for getting the rig ready to restep the mast included torquing down the beam mounting bolts and installing the chainplates. It was important to check the beam mounting bolts because the rig pulls on the hulls and if the bolts are loose the hulls can become canted. Some of the rigging cables are cut to fit and would therefore be an incorrect length. The result would be finding out later that the beam bolts need tightening, and whoops!, the sailing rig doesn’t fit anymore.
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It took 2 days to mount the chainplates, way longer than I expected. One problem was a heat wave, hitting 98 on successive days. The chainplates have bolts that pass through them, then through the hull skin, and are secured with nylock nuts inside. This means a lot of climbing up on deck and then down in the hull to hold the nut with vice grips or a wrench, then going up and down outside to turn the bolt and tighten it.
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Each bolt in the chainplates is a unique length. Some are passing through several backing pieces of wood, some are passing through a stringer, and all had to be checked for proper fit. My solution was to shove a lot of bolts into the chainplates to dry fit them, then climb up into the hulls and mark in a notebook which bolts are too long or too short. Then go back outside and rearrange the bolts until all were the right length.
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Next was a trip to the hardware store to purchase 3/8-16 stainless steel nylock nuts, after spending considerable time looking for the ones I took off not that long ago. When the chainplates were removed, they took with them some of the glass surface of the hulls and some bedding compound, probably 5200. This all had to be ground off the chainplates. I found using the multitool with a scraper blade removed the most material the fastest, then a quick clean up with the angle grinder and flap disk made the chainplates look as good as new.
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Carefully keeping the bolts in order and not mixing them up, Bed-it butyl caulking was wrapped around the bolts just under the head, then around the shank after they were inserted through the chainplate. Next came running up and down, in and out, putting fender washers and nylock nuts on each bolt, tightening it, then moving on to another.
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The photo is of the starboard upper and lower shroud chainplates. Aft of them is a chainplate for the running backstay.
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