Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
24 February 2018 | st marys, ga
19 February 2018 | st marys, ga
12 February 2018 | st marys, ga
09 February 2018 | st marys, ga
05 February 2018 | st marys, ga
03 February 2018 | st marys, ga
30 January 2018 | st marys, ga
27 January 2018 | st marys, ga
22 January 2018 | st marys, ga
20 January 2018 | st marys, ga
12 January 2018 | st marys, ga
02 January 2018 | st marys, ga
01 January 2018 | st marys, ga
30 December 2017 | st marys, ga
26 December 2017 | st marys, ga
26 December 2017 | st marys, ga
23 December 2017 | st marys, ga
21 December 2017 | st marys, ga
20 December 2017 | st marys, ga
19 December 2017 | st marys, ga
Recent Blog Posts
24 February 2018 | st marys, ga

Drone Photography

The issue of professional photography I ran into last post is probably not an issue. If people take public images off the internet and use them, why not? If you need a photographer to make an advertisement or shoot your wedding, certainly no internet photograph is going to work for you. The professional [...]

19 February 2018 | st marys, ga

Catamaran Launch at St Marys

A time lapse video of the relaunch of Time and Tide, a Fountaine Pajot Antigua catamaran, was uploaded to Flickr at:

12 February 2018 | st marys, ga

Paglia e Fieno

The superfoiler race series from Geelong, Australia happened on their Sunday afternoon, our Saturday evening on the USA East Coast. I managed to fall asleep while napping so I could follow the action from about 10 PM to midnight Saturday. I woke Sunday morning.

09 February 2018 | st marys, ga

More Flying Boats

I don’t know of many people who watch sailboat races, but I am one who will. The Superfoiler series from Down Under is similar to the 18 foot skiff racing. This is a professional sailing series with the boats funded by sponsorship and big name sailors hired as crew. The boats are light, sail on [...]

05 February 2018 | st marys, ga

i60e Action Cam

With my main distraction, the quadcopter drone, out of the way with a burnt battery charger, I had no excuse to malinger. I had an unpleasant task that I was avoiding, sponging out the bilges that were somehow collecting rainwater. It is hard for me to contort myself down under the galley table, under [...]

03 February 2018 | st marys, ga

Claude Diode

The android app that helped me so much is called quadcopter XG simulator. It is free and seems to accurately mimic actual control of a quadcopter.

Bon Voyage Crawdad

12 January 2018 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/chilly winter
The cold snap, which is the coldest weather I have experienced down here in St Marys seemed to persist longer than forecast, about a week. It has been freezing overnight and most of the mornings, temperature going down to 28 on successive nights. This is nothing compared to what people up North are experiencing. At least we now have a forecast of more seasonable temperatures for the next week or so. It is time to get back to work on the starboard hull bottom.
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A 10 pack of 40 grit flap discs came from Amazon at about 20 bucks for the pack. I began using them with the idea to dispose of them when they lost that brand new sharpness. I used 8 discs to grind the aft third of the starboard hull. These discs were zirconium, blue, and otherwise comparable to the aluminum oxide discs from Harbor Freight. They are made by Benchmark Abrasives. They are less than half the price of the Harbor Freight discs and the Harbor Freight discs are about half the price of the flap discs at Lowe’s.
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Remaining jobs to try to get done before the weather goes cold again include grinding the bottoms of the keels and marking the waterlines.
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The little catamaran dinghy, Furball, was sold and Richard is planning a replacement in the future, for now they are using an inflatable. It is remarkable that the dinghy sold in just a couple of days in the dead of winter.
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I am glad to be feeling healthy after getting laid low with a virus over the holiday. Fortunately my illness coincided with cold and wet weather, so conditions were unfavorable for outdoor work, and I was in no condition to do any anyway. A good samaritan in the yard was reading my blog, thought I sounded like I was delirious, and donated a chicken carcass for me to make chicken soup, which I did. Instead of thanking her, I complained that there was no meat on this chicken, so I ended up with additional chicken meat that had gone into chicken alfredo. Some of this went into the soup and made a sort of cream of chicken soup. Later I took the remainder and mixed it with creamy vodka sauce and garden rigatoni pasta, and the result was quite good.
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I discussed the marking of the waterlines with the carpenter who knew a lot about such things and he said it only took about an hour to do a catamaran using string and about 3 people. I had already thought about it and found my spool of monofilament line, 80lb. proof, which was stretchy and could be drawn tight making a horizontal straight line.
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I had marked on the bows and sterns of the hulls where the old waterline had been. My idea was to go up 3 inches and mark again, this would be the level of the bootstripe on the painted topsides. I would not paint the bootstripe, I would paint the whole hull bottom with hard bottom paint, two coats. Then I would mark down 3 inches and paint with ablative bottom paint, two coats. My bootstripe would be bottom paint.
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The scheme of marking the waterline was to stretch monofilament across the bows at the waterline marks, but extend it to the sides and anchor the monofilament on something, maybe rebar, but it had to be something long enough to extend up high enough, maybe 5 feet or so from ground level up to the level of the waterline. Then another piece of monofilament could be drawn from the mark at the stern of the boat and attached to the monofilament crossing the bows. I did this and drew the long piece of monofilament so that it just met the side of the boat at the stern and maybe just 8 feet or so forward. Then I taped it in place there, and moved the end at the bow closer to the bow. This enabled another section to be taped in place, and so on, till the whole waterline was marked by the monofilament taped in place in sections. I went back and adjusted any wobbles in the line, then marked it with a permanent marker, a sharpie.
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I then moved to the inboard side of that hull and did the same, then the inboard side of the second hull, then, as the sun was setting, the final outboard side of the second hull. It took more than an hour, but it would have taken much more time to organize a crew of more people.
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It was the same old story of anxiety about an upcoming task, how to do it, what could go wrong, plan and worry some more, and then get on with it, and the work gets done quickly with a good result.
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My next task was to grind on the bottoms of the keels. This lasted about 30 seconds. I had to rethink this task. I spent the rest of the day gabbing with people and playing games on the computer.
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My old friend from the TV days was down in Jacksonville and coming up to St. Marys for a visit. He is a sailor and very experienced with the sea and sea lore. We toured the boatyard and he had a lot to say about the various boats, recalling stories from experiences he had with similar boats in far places. When we stopped near the woodshop due to rain, he was introduced to the carpenter, a walking marine encyclopedia. They really hit it off, knew some of the old captains, the old tall ships, the ports, the routes, the stories.
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We ended up at the gas station restaurant for wings night, when they sell chicken wings at a discount. The best (only) restaurant within 2 miles of the boatyard. The skipper was there, the Canadian English professor was there, and we had a gam. It was remarkable how my two friends, my old TV buddy, and my boatyard partner, the carpenter, got engaged in conversation about things I had no knowledge of, I had never sailed on a tall ship, never worked for hire in a boatyard, but they were talking and talking. The subject of the tall ships in the Great Lakes came up, and the waters of Lake Michigan and Lake Superior came up, turquoise, how to describe it, and then the English professor says, “I grew up there”. It was a night of unity. No monopolization of the conversation, just wait your turn to chime in. Here in the North River Marsh of Georgia we had a Canadian, a Texas/Louisianian, a New Yorker, and a Connecticut Yankee all engaging in a gam.
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I prepared to photograph the relaunching of Crawdad, the 42 foot Grand Banks trawler that had been my neighbor for many months. The schedule ended up aborted for the day, so we went to the town of St. Marys and took a few shots there and visited the Cumberland Island National Seashore museum. When we got back Crawdad was in the slings of the travel lift, ready for relaunching at about 6 AM next morning.
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I wasn’t going to get up early to shoot the launch, but here is a nice shot of the owners and their pets waiting for the launch.

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