Kaimusailing

s/v Kaimu Wharram Catamaran

Vessel Name: Kaimu
Vessel Make/Model: Wharram Custom
Hailing Port: Norwalk, CT
Crew: Andy and the Kaimu Crew
About: Sailors in the Baltimore, Annapolis, DC area.
07 October 2016 | St. Marys, GA
07 October 2016 | St. Marys, GA
05 October 2016 | St. Marys, GA
01 October 2016 | St. Marys, GA
27 September 2016 | St. Marys, GA
25 September 2016 | Fernandina Beach, FL
25 September 2016 | Fernandina Beach, FL
25 September 2016 | Fernandina Beach, FL
25 September 2016 | Fernandina Beach, FL
25 September 2016 | Fernandina Beach, FL
25 September 2016 | Fernandina Beach, FL
25 September 2016 | Fernandina Beach, FL
25 September 2016 | Fernandina Beach, FL
25 September 2016 | Wynah Bay, SC
19 September 2016 | Carolina Beach, NC
19 September 2016 | Carolina Beach, NC
19 September 2016 | Carolina Beach, NC
19 September 2016 | Carolina Beach, NC
16 September 2016
16 September 2016 | Morehead City, NC
Recent Blog Posts
15 August 2017 | st marys, ga

Paddling the Canoe

The Hawaii trip was at its end. We visited my parents’ grave and I flew out to Honolulu later, then left for the mainland.

14 August 2017 | Kohala Mountains, Hawaii

Mo'okini Heiau

Daughter’s boyfriend, an archaeologist, wanted to visit the Mo’okini heiau, which is a sacred ceremonial site, probably used for human sacrifice. It dates from the 5th century and is one of the oldest sites in the Hawaiian Islands.

13 August 2017 | Volcano National Park, Hawaii

Halema'uma'u

We went up the road from Pohoiki on the south coast to rendezvous with my two brothers, then continued on the main highway to Kea'au, then turned left up the mountain. The road goes up the north shoulder of Mauna Loa, considered the largest mountain in the world based on mass. On its flank is Kilaeua, [...]

13 August 2017 | Wa'a Wa'a, Puna, Hawaii

Puna Beach Road

Here is a link to some nice photos of the beach road, or King's Highway, from near Kaloli Point in Paradise Park, Puna, Hawaii, to (almost) Kalapana near Cape Kumukahi.

13 August 2017 | Kalapana, Ka'u, Hawaii

Lava Viewing at Kalapana

Here is a link to an album on flickr of photos taken on the road to Kapoho, then to Pohoiki, then to Kalapana, back to Pohoiki to board a boat for lava viewing where the lava pours into the steaming ocean.

11 August 2017 | Kalapana, Hawaii

Volcano Coast

Our stay at Kahala came to a close and we flew to Hilo on the Big Island. Here I had two brothers and a sister and their families. Here my parents are buried, so it is also a pilgrimage to see their grave.

Paddling the Canoe

15 August 2017 | st marys, ga
Capn Andy/100 degrees F.
The Hawaii trip was at its end. We visited my parents’ grave and I flew out to Honolulu later, then left for the mainland.
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My niece Gina was working downtown Hilo at an exhibition of the new northwest islands and reefs that have been declared a marine sanctuary by President Obama, a Hawaiian. The politics of the mainland seem far away, but the story of the reefs, Gina’s involvement as a schoolgirl in producing a video about them, her inclusion into a world class group of environmental students at UC Santa Barbara, and her later bachelor’s degree at Stanford, and her decision to return to Hawaii to pursue her graduate degrees here at home, all come full circle to this little dot in the ocean. Hilo, the city, the county seat of the county of Hawaii, is a small town. Everyone knows everyone else. There’s no NFL, NBA, or other national franchised sports team anywhere in Hawaii. The local high school teams are important, and the university is the biggest thing, sportswise.
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There have been many writers who have come to Hawaii to live, Paul Thereaux (?) and James Mitchener for instance. The food culture is vibrant with farm to table, maybe this is where it was rediscovered, how else are you going to get anything in Hawaii for your chefs? The surf culture, the canoe culture, the beach culture. My nieces and nephews are growing up bathed in this and take it for granted. No wonder Gina decided to come back to continue her academic work on her home island.
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I used to think that the culture of Hawaii was a shallow culture with deep pockets of individual cultures, the Japanese, the Chinese, the Mormons, the Native Hawaiians, and all the other little groups that band together with common language and ideals. No one is in the majority. All have to interact with others and so you have a common ground, a common culture that is somewhat shallow, but rich underneath. If you are here in Hawaii and comfortable in your surroundings with others who talk like you and understand your ways, you will frequently be challenged by an encounter with someone who is totally alien, but you have the superficial culture to communicate, get to know one another, and be introduced into another whole new universe.
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And on an island, you get to know everyone else, all the cultures, maybe not in depth, but all are aware that this is a special place. I’ve learned that there is always something new to learn and increase my understanding. It is a place where the earth is projecting its essence up through a volcano, the sea is washing over it with incessant surfing waves, the air is untouched as it cleanses itself over the oceans, only to arrive with puffy clouds and pure rainwater to shower on the volcano’s lava, steaming, bringing a profusion of tropical plants and fruits to life. This would be an ideal place to be if the rest of the world decides to blow itself apart with violence, religious or not, when the water gets scarce and the globe gets unlivable, when we can’t get along together, even in a large country.
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Now we are back in the swamps of Georgia, back in the gulag. There is news of what is basically a riot in Charlottesville, VA. It sounded like a right wing white supremacist rally gone wrong. Later more details came in, it was a reaction to the removal of a statue of General Robert E. Lee from a park in that city. In an age where marijuana is legal, same sex marriages are legal, there remains a reactionary element that to me is no different than the islamic fundamentalists. Before I retired, I found one of my clients to be an african-american church and I had to understand their ways. We talked a lot about things with the idea that they could educate this white boy who had no clue about video production of gospel singing. There was a huge cultural gulf between us. I was about math and science and not about religion. At one point someone said he hated something, he was using the word casually, like I hate internet ads, or something like that. I said it was important to be careful about the word “hate”. It closes the mind to reason, it creates a wall in your understanding, it prevents reasoning between people who “hate” each other. When I retired the fellows at the church were upset that I would no longer come visit them, they said I was like a brother to them.
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In Hawaii everybody is Auntie, or Uncle, Bruddah, Sistah, and there is a casual acceptance of people who are different, because everybody is different there, so many individual groups, all packed into a small island, all have to get along. Of course there is trouble there, the plaque at the Mo’okini heiau has “United States” on it, but someone had grafitti’d “White States” and now the United States is noticeably more highly polished. There are fights going on all over the world, and most of them are the result of careless use of the word “hate”.

Mo'okini Heiau

14 August 2017 | Kohala Mountains, Hawaii
Capn Andy/85 degree Tradewinds
Daughter’s boyfriend, an archaeologist, wanted to visit the Mo’okini heiau, which is a sacred ceremonial site, probably used for human sacrifice. It dates from the 5th century and is one of the oldest sites in the Hawaiian Islands.
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Mo’okini is on the Kohala Coast, north of Kona and Kwaihae. Maui looks near enough to swim over. A few miles away to the north is the town of Hawi, the northernmost town on the Big Island.
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Our drive started in Hilo and went over the refurbished Saddle Road which bisects the volcanoes, Mauna Kea to the north and Mauna Loa to the south. It terminates west of Waimea and one can turn left to drive down to Kailua-Kona or right to go to Kwaihae or Waimea. Kwaihae was our destination for pizza at Cafe Pesto. In Hawaii, Hawaiian pizza is Kalua Pig and fresh pineapple. Kalua pig is similar to barbecue pulled pork, it has the same shredded texture and smoky flavor, but traditional Hawaiian herbs like ti, banana stalks, and taro leaves make an aromatic unique flavor.
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We continued north and noticed a convenient place to photograph Maui, rising above the horizon to the northwest. It turned out to be the entrance of Lapakahi Village, a semi-restored ancient Hawaiian fishing village. It is a beautiful location and excellent place to launch a canoe, with a gravel beach of small round black lava and white coral stones.
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Onward to the north we searched for Mo'okini. It is not easy to get to. In the past it had been kapu except for ali’i and kahuna, forbidden to visitors except for chiefs and priests. The road to the site is unimproved, full of potholes, and proved impassable for our rental car. In the album of pictures, at:
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https://www.flickr.com/photos/8728395@N03/albums/72157685017097074
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there is a picture of one of the mud puddles, which I subsequently fell into, adding mud to a sore knee.
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The Mo’okini heiau is a pile of stones and, according to traditional tales, built in one night by a large army forming a bucket brigade and passing the stones one by one from the Pololu Valley almost 20 miles away. Another tale is that it was built by the Menehune, which are something like Hawaiian leprechauns. The size of the heiau can be seen in the photos at the above web address. Large flat bowl shaped stones were used for human sacrifice. There is a nice view of Maui across the channel. The base of Haleakela is obscured by clouds, but the peak can be seen clearly.
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After our hike to the heiau we headed for Hawi and some liquid refreshment. As the day drew to a close we continued along the highway through the Kohala Mountains, an area of large rolling hills with livestock and for us, a rainbow. We came down the heights above Waimea just as the sun was getting lower, the best time of day for landscape photography. Then the sun set and we were able to get some good shots of the hills along the Saddle Road.
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We finished the day with a late dinner at my brother’s house in Paradise Park. Mahalo Bro’.

Halema'uma'u

13 August 2017 | Volcano National Park, Hawaii
Capn Andy/Tradewinds 85 degrees
We went up the road from Pohoiki on the south coast to rendezvous with my two brothers, then continued on the main highway to Kea'au, then turned left up the mountain. The road goes up the north shoulder of Mauna Loa, considered the largest mountain in the world based on mass. On its flank is Kilaeua, the active volcano. Along the way we gathered up my sister and her husband, then went into the Volcanoes National Park. We took pictures at the Jaeger Museum which overlooks Halema'uma'u, the volcano's crater. Steam and fumes were pouring out of the giant crater. It is a crater within a crater within a crater. There is a road all the way around, but now it is closed due to the volcanic activity.
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I took a lot of photos due to my forgetting how to change the auto advance setting on the shutter button. It was hard to keep it down to 2 shots per click. The daylight pictures did not show the great depth of the crater or its size. Later towards sunset the photos got more and more interesting. I was increasing the digital "film speed" while keeping the lens at f11.
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After the sun set and the clouds began to glow, it seemed that every shot was photographic art, but it must happen every day here. It is at an altitude that enhances the sunset, plus we had clouds driven by the tradewinds jammed between Kilaeua and Mauna Loa boiling up, dark, below the sun's rays, topped by the brilliant orange and red clouds high up, Mauna Loa itself a dark low shape, slate.
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With the "film speed" advanced to about 1600, shutter exposure times were several seconds long and the quality of the shot depended on maintaining the camera steady, as well as catching the glowing fumes and steam from the volcano when they were not moving rapidly. About 1 in 3 photos came out OK. When I tried to shoot the moon, it disappeared behind the high clouds.
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I put the photos in another album on flickr at;
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https://www.flickr.com/photos/8728395@N03/albums/72157684843541951
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These are unretouched photos, so you can click on them, get the high res, download, and crop or photoshop them.

Puna Beach Road

13 August 2017 | Wa'a Wa'a, Puna, Hawaii
Capn Andy/Tradewinds 85 degrees
Here is a link to some nice photos of the beach road, or King's Highway, from near Kaloli Point in Paradise Park, Puna, Hawaii, to (almost) Kalapana near Cape Kumukahi.
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https://www.flickr.com/photos/8728395@N03/albums/72157684842403871

Lava Viewing at Kalapana

13 August 2017 | Kalapana, Ka'u, Hawaii
Capn Andy/Tradewinds 85 degrees
Here is a link to an album on flickr of photos taken on the road to Kapoho, then to Pohoiki, then to Kalapana, back to Pohoiki to board a boat for lava viewing where the lava pours into the steaming ocean.
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https://www.flickr.com/photos/8728395@N03/albums/72157685060995303

Volcano Coast

11 August 2017 | Kalapana, Hawaii
Capn Andy/85 degree Tradewinds
Our stay at Kahala came to a close and we flew to Hilo on the Big Island. Here I had two brothers and a sister and their families. Here my parents are buried, so it is also a pilgrimage to see their grave.
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The Big Island is big and the size isn’t apparent until the trip is taken across the island or up to the north portion of the island. The island is a cluster of large volcanoes, one of which is continuously active, spewing out lava since the mid 1980‘s. I have been visiting regularly for all that time and more. The first few visits brings you to all the usual tourist spots, then later other spots, off the beaten path, are explored, until it seems we have seen it all.
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But Hawaii is a big island and there is always something new, maybe not apparent to the tourist bustling about, in a hurry to see the usual. My plan was to focus on the southern shore of the island and photo doc the Kings Highway, an ancient path around the island used by the chief’s messengers and for commerce between clan territories. The system of land ownership divided the island like a pie with clans controlling a slice. The Kings Highway ran around the coast and crossed all the major territories. There were complicated rules about who could traverse where. Might was right. It was a feudal system and human life was expendable. Many minor offenses were punishable by death. Cannibalism was practiced.
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It would take a long time to follow the Kings Highway all the way around the island, but if I concentrated on just the southeast quadrant, from Hilo to Kalapana, it could be done in a few days. The section between Hilo and Kaloli Point is private property and not easily accessed, so we would skip that section and start near Kaloli Point.
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The original footpath transformed to a bridle path for horseback after Europeans arrived. In the 1800‘s there were no carriage roads on the island. All travel was by boat or canoe, or by horseback or on foot. After plantations were begun, railways were built to move agricultural products, machinery, and people.
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The Kings Highway or beach road never became a major thoroughfare, it existed as a rough dirt road or semi-improved road. The main roads were further inland from the coast. Unlike most islands, on Hawaii there were no seaside villages with coastal roads connecting them. This hindered development and resulted in the development of towns further inland. Thus, the towns of Keaau and Pahoa grew while coastal villages died out. They exist now as maybe a group of houses, maybe with a small local store. Others completely died out and we only see a grove of coconut palms where a village existed in the past.
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We drove down to the sea near Kaloli Point in a community known as Paradise Park. We took photos there and then began on Beach Road at Makuopihi Point. The road was very rough at first, then it had some kind of semi-pavement on it. Then we were into the lower part of Hawaiian Beaches subdivision. Now the roads were paved and marked properly with stop signs, etc. We continued out of the civilized world into the jungle.
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The beach road was now very hilly and rough. There was evidence of old villages. Coconut trees, rough beaches of round cobbles, and level areas which might have had dwellings long ago. All along the route were giant fruit trees and in some places, trees that should have been removed to make a proper road, but were left to form a zig zaggy road, one lane in places. The road began to find its way into more open country and then we were in the area of Kapoho and Cape Kumukahi.
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Kapoho was a resort and fishing community on a small bay frequented by the Japanese. In the old days when there were railroad lines running through the sugar cane plantations, there was also one serving Kapoho.
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In 1960 Kilauea crater on the slopes of Mauna Loa was erupting and then at some point there was a subsiding of the lava in the crater. It wasn’t over though. The lava had melted through into a lava tube that ran down the East Rift Zone, and then burst to the surface in a spectacular eruption that devastated the village of Kapoho and filled half of the bay. Although the village was mostly destroyed, a few houses remained, and acres of new land were created, fresh lava rock.
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Cape Kumukahi was on my list to photograph, but the narrow dirt road to the cape was blocked by a large truck. The huge piles of volcanic rock and cinders are in demand for landscaping and road maintenance. Just bring your truck and pile it on. The volcano will add more, someday.
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The Kings Highway continues along the coast leaving behind the banana groves and flower farms of Kapoho. Soon we are at the boat launch at Pohoiki (Po-hee-kee). The road jogs here and continues along a very pretty part of the coast, past the tiny hamlet of Opihikao (opihi are limpets, small shellfish that are scraped off the rocks at low tide and eaten, kao means to eat, so Opihikao is where you eat opihi).
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Our trip is cut short due to a scheduled boat ride to photograph the lava flowing into the sea. It is about 18 miles by boat and though the sea is quiet today, it is rough, it is the Pacific Ocean. We return to Pohoiki and get on the power boat, head out, hugging the coast, and find out the two brothers who operate the boat are brothers of my niece’s boyfriend, native Hawaiian, and they had lived right across the street from my parents’ first Hawaiian house. Big Island is a small world.
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After our photo op, we return, head to Paradise Park, and then up to the volcano.
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The photo is of the lava pouring into the sea and exploding into a fine black sand.
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