s/v Karma

Karma in Motion

Who: Clint, Reina & Duke
Port: West Palm Beach, FL

Where are we?

Your destiny, is a result of your actions. Live by a code of conduct that will secure supreme hapiness and worldy joys; which are usually the little things.
13 June 2016 | Puerto Natlaes
12 November 2015 | Southern Patagonia, Chile 50 39.60S:74 33.12W
02 November 2015 | Golfo de Penas, Patagonia, Chile
17 October 2015 | Laguna San Rafael, Patagonia, Chile
13 October 2015 | Laguna San Rafael, Patagonia, Chile
01 October 2015 | Caleta Poza de Oro, Patagonia, Chile
20 September 2015 | Los Altos, Paraguay
06 September 2015 | Chiloe
04 September 2015 | Puerto Montt, Chile
05 January 2015 | Isla Isabela
01 December 2014 | La Libertad, Ecuador
01 August 2014 | US Trip
15 July 2014 | Ecuador

Patagonia Adventures - 09/12 - 10/16/2016 Puerto Natales to the Beagle Channel

26 March 2017
Reina
Our route from Puerto Natales to Puerto Williams:



A closer look at some of our stops.





The numbered flags on the charts correspond to the numbers in parentheses.

With some excitement and trepidation (on my part) we left Puerto Natales (1) to continue our journey south. It was high time we finished what we started.

The season for centolla (king crab) is June through November. We had not tried any yet and what we had caught could hardly be considered "king" crab so when we pulled into our second anchorage (2) and saw that we would be sharing it with some fisherman we were very excited.

#2

For the cost of a couple of beers we had a wonderful crab dinner aboard Karma. We would later learn that it was not exactly a fair trade but we were happy to finally have some crab.



In Canal Smyth lies the hulking remains of the ship Santa Leonore (3) who ran hard aground on Paso Shoal.

#3

She definitely serves as a good marker for the shallow area.

#3

At its southern end Canal Smyth meets the Strait of Magellan. This part (6) of the Strait of Magellan is open to the wind and swell of the South Pacific Ocean. This is not a place you want to be with strong weather. In addition to accelerated winds and large seas you have the effect of the current of the two channels meeting. Fortunately not too far from the entrance to the Strait of Magellan is a beautiful and very well protected anchorage, Caleta Teokita (4).

#4

From the anchorage you can hike up to the top of the island and look out to Islotes Fairway (5) and the Faro Fairway (Fairway Lighthouse). The rainbow has got to be a good sign, right?

#5

#5

We were tied off in Caleta Teokita (4) for eight days waiting for "suitable" (Reina-type) weather to enter the Strait to start heading east. Finally, just when Clint was ready to snap we had an opportunity to continue on "comfortably".

We had a beautiful day and a wonderful sail with 15-20kts of wind. When we first set out the seas were a little uncomfortable with a 6-7 foot close swell on our beam, but once we turned east the seas were behind us and we had a wonderful downwind run. We even had some company.



The eight days we spent in Caleta Teokita (4) were not all idle. We passed our time hiking, kayaking, working on boat projects, and most importantly making a sign with our name on it for Bahía Borja (7). Árbol con tableros or trees bearing boards with ship names is an old tradition in Patagonia. Joshua Slocum even refers to them in his book Spray.

There are other anchorages with an árbol con tableros but this is the first one we had stopped at. It was very cool to see all the other boats that had been there some over forty years ago and some that we even had heard of or know.

#7



We were very excited to put our sign just below that of our good friends Giamba and Vale from Angelique II.



Where the Strait of Magellan turns north to Punta Arenas and then eventually leads to the Atlantic Ocean it meets up with Canal Magdalena (8) which heads south to Canal Cockburn. There are two other canals that lead south from the Strait of Magellan which are actually short cuts. We chose Canal Magdalena because we were not in a hurry and we had heard how beautiful it is. We were not disappointed. About midway down the canal, where it turns west to meet with Canal Cockburn, stands Monte Sarmiento (9). At 7,887 feet it is one of the highest points in Tierra del Fuego.

#9

#9

We were strongly encouraged by a friend to spend a couple of nights in Bahía Angelito (10) in Seno Agostine. If you look closely you will see Karma safely anchored in Bahía Angelito. The picture below does not even capture the scale, it is an incredibly dramatic spot that is hard to capture in words let alone a camera. It is a very special place.

#10

We even had the added bonus of fishermen. More crab for us!

#10

#10

#10

We hiked up behind the boat and had spectacular views of Seno Agostini which runs north parallel to the Northwest Arm of the Beagle Canal with the Darwin Range as its border. These glaciers are part of the same icefield that we will see when we get to the northwest arm of Beagle Canal.







Canal Magdalena runs in a southerly direction from the Strait of Magellan for about 20nm where it then turns northwest and becomes Canal Cockburn.



At the eastern extremity of Canal Cockburn is Seno Chico (11), a very narrow 6 mile long fjord that ends with several glaciers. Unfortunately there was too much ice to go all the way to the glaciers but halfway down we tucked into Caleta Lago.



You can see the flow ice just outside the little indent we were tucked into. This was by far the most dramatic anchorages on our run south.

Canal Cockburn is approximately 40nm long. It runs northwest before heading due west and then cuts southwest to the Pacific. It can be a real challenge and we spent several nights in a couple different anchorages waiting out weather looking for a good window to enter the exposed area that would lead us to the infamous Canal Brecknock and its highly anticipated anchorage called Caleta Brecknock (12).

In all of our conversations with fellow cruisers that have travelled these waters it seemed to us that everyone mentioned "Brecknock". The area is notorious for its very strong winds and rapidly changing weather. All of the area is known for extreme conditions and Brecknock is the pinnacle. Fortunately there is a very safe anchorage to wait out the harshest of the conditions.

#12

In addition to being very safe (do you see our 8-point tie off) it has the added bonus of being spectacularly beautiful with lots of great hikes.

Across from the boat and behind the smooth granite wall lies a hidden lake. The smooth rock made for an easy climb.

#12

The granite hills seem to go on forever. Clint was able to climb up above me, the chicken. Do you see me in the bottom right corner of the picture below?

#12

After almost a month of travelling the channels we finally had the company of another sailboat that joined us in Caleta Brecknock (12).

#12

We spent a couple days hanging out with the crew of the French flaged sailboat Basic Instinct; Sauréa, Vaso, Lucy, Christina, and Captain Laurent.



We both left Caleta Brecknock the same day. The plan was not to end up, again, in the same anchorage. We were not happy with the first anchorage we picked so we wound up tied off to Basic Instinct in a much better spot, Caleta Atracadero (13).

#13

#13

The Captain of Basic Instinct, Laurent, and his new best friend Duke.



While in Caleta Atracadero we had a beach B-B-Q; at least we tried to, the wood was a little wet.





This was another spot where we needed to wait for good conditions to cross our last open area of water before Puerto Williams. After four days we got a wonderful window to make our way to the beginning of the entrance of The Beagle (14).






Patagonia Adventures - 04/02/16 to 04/23/16 PP and TT Come to Chilly Chile (& Llarry the Llama Too)

11 September 2016 | Puerto Natlaes
Reina Reina
Have you ever heard the expression, "When life gives you lemons you make lemonade"? Well when your boat gets de-masted you go to Patagonia according to Petr Petr and Tracy Trace, aka PP and TT.



Petr and Tracy live aboard their catamaran, "Genesis", in Grenada (lots about them in our 2013 Grenada posts). They both work extremely hard running a very successful charter business. Never in a million years did we ever think they would have the time to come visit us but then misfortune struck, they lost their mast. They had to cancel all of their charters and park the boat while they waited for a new one to arrive from France. So, why not come visit us? At first we thought they were joking but before we knew it the tickets were purchased, they were coming for three whole weeks!

The image below is a digital copy of the Chilean paper chart of the area we explored on Karma. I numbered each of our stops.



Number 1, Puerto Consuelo

We started our adventure in Puerto Consuelo where we were anchored off Estancia Eberhardt.





To say Petr and Tracy are beer "drinkers" is putting it lightly. We were a little worried about where we were going to put it all. Fortunately down here we can stow it on the deck and it stays nice and cold.



We spent their first day exploring the estancia and playing with the horses.



Tracy the Horse Whisperer, who knew?



The next day we were up early and underway up Estéro Última Esperanza.





Number 2, Puerto Bellavista





We did some trailblazing...













Petr and Tracy had us foraging for mushrooms everywhere we went.



some kayaking...





My merken;)



and a little fishing.





We were not having any luck at catching fish so Clint decided to do a GoPro video of Tracy bringing in the big one, "Duke". Would have been a great video except the captain forgot to turn on the camera. Duke did not think it was that funny.

After a couple of days we were ready to move. We woke early to a beautiful sunrise.



When Clint went to lift the anchor the windlass was not operating. Normally at this point there would be widespread panic but not this time, we had are very own technician aboard.



I would rather not post this rather "flamboyant" picture of Clint but it is a tribute to Kurt and the US Navy. Petr donned Kurt's jumpsuit and went to work on the windlass. Of course Petr had us up and running in no time and we were back in business.



Number 3, Puerto Toro

This was a new spot for us. Puerto Toro is a very short and easy dinghy ride to Bernardo O'Higgins Park and Glacier Serrano which we could see from the boat.







An up close look at the glacier,



and of course some ice for our scotch.



We towed the kayaks up the Río Serrano looking for a nice spot for a picnic and some kayaking. The river goes all the way into Torres del Paine Park which we could see in the distance.









The current in the river was too strong for us to get very far but we enjoyed our picnic and the stunning view.

Another beautiful sunrise and another day on the move.



We headed out of Estéro Última Esperanza towards Puerto Natales. It was a beautiful day and we even got to pull out the sails.



Some dolphins getting in on the action.



Number 4, Puerto Natales





We stopped just off of Puerto Natales for the night. We needed to stock up on some more beer, can you believe it? We also got some fresh salmon, mussels, and clams at the local fish market.





Less than $1 for 1 kg (2.2 lbs) of mussels!

After our night on the town we headed west towards Estéro de las Montañas.



Tracy got some smoked mussels in town, Petr was not a fan.



Number 5, Caleta Desaparecidos aka Sealville



This spot is one of our all-time favorites. It is just teaming with wildlife, especially seals and sea lions.

One of the funniest moments on our trip was when Petr kayaked to shore to tie off our bow. Clint, Tracy, and I were watching from the bow and spotted a HUGE South American Sea Lion exactly where Petr was headed. The expression on Petr's face when he finally saw it was priceless.









I think this was one of Petr and Tracy's favorite spots too. They had a great time kayaking with the seals while Clint and I watched from the deck.



As always, when Tracy is around good food is sure to follow. She is an amazing chef and likes to experiment with new things. When we stopped in Puerto Natales we loaded up on some more steak for our red meat deprived friends (they can not buy steak in Grenada). While at the butcher shop Tracy spotted these and just had to have them.







Have you ever heard of Rocky Mountain Oysters? These are Patagonian Cajones. Like everything Tracy makes they were yummy!

Back on the move all the way to the top of Estéro de las Montañas.



Number 6, Caleta Pelagic



This was another new spot for us. We had some strong weather coming and wanted a good secure spot to hang out in until it passed.



We did manage to get some exploring in before the snow and sleet started.





We celebrated a very special day in this spot, MY birthday, and we did not let the wet and cold keep us from observing it properly with a cookout.











My super bitchin biker look, thanks TT and PP (notice the crown on the table?).



Every night we tried desperately to catch crabs in our handy dandy homemade crab pot but to no avail. We did however catch a bunch of these guys.



What are they you ask...squat lobsters. We did not know that at the time, my very smart friend went home and googled it. We thought they were a type of crawfish and we did eat them, what little of them there was.

We let this guy go.



With the weather cleared we decided it was time to move on.

Number 7, Caleta Mist

From Caleta Mist we kayaked up the small fjord to the glacier.













Petr and Tracy made a friend.





We also did some extreme hiking at the blue lagoon.



Not too far into the hike up and over the very slippery rocks the girls bailed and the boys continued on.







They even got a little artsy.

After a couple of days exploring from Caleta Mist we decided to start our return to Puerto Consuelo.



We went back to Sealville (#5) so Petr and Tracy could get in a little more play time with the seals.



From Sealville we had a beautiful run back to Puerto Consuelo.



Tracy soaking it all in.





Petr and his "little buddy".



Number 1, Puerto Consuelo



After almost three weeks on Karma we were all looking forward to a little road trip. We loaded into Putty, boys in the front girls in the back (with the Bloody Mary's), and headed to Torres del Paine National Park to hike around Lago Grey to view Glacier Grey.



















Petr and Tracy's last two days were spectacular. The sun was out in full force and the visibility was remarkable. We spent those last two days exploring the area at the head of Estéro Eberhardt, Villa Luisa.







The fall colors were in full force.

















Right before Petr and Tracy arrived the flamingos started to arrive in Estéro Eberhardt. Tons of them. I mentioned to Tracy to keep an eye out for them on her bus ride from Punta Arenas. She thought I was pulling her leg. Flamingos in Patagonia??? Apparently flamingos aren't just in the tropics.









It is not every day that you get the cows to pose in your boat picture.



The visibility was so clear that Petr was able to snap this incredible shot of the moon on their last night with us.



So here's to 23 days, 2987 pictures, and endless memories. Cheers!



Oh in case you were wondering who Llarry the Llama is...



Yes we realize he is a lamb but we like the way Llarry the Llama rolls of the tongue.

Oh and by the way sometimes a "cigar is just a cigar".

P.S. Petr shot some unbelievable video of his play time with the seals at Sealville. We have not edited the videos yet. We are leaving tomorrow for our long passage south to Puerto Williams. It was really important to us that we post this blog of our special time with Petr and Tracy before we left so the videos will have to wait until we get to Puerto Williams. Sorry Petr.

The Putty Files - Change of Scenery

23 August 2016
Reina
Puerto Montt, Chile
March 2016


Norwegian Cruise Lines anchored of Puerto Montt.


The view of downtown Puerto Montt from the food court at the BIG mall.

At the end of February Clint and I left Karma securely anchored (we hoped) in Puerto Coñsuleo and headed back to Puerto Montt. When we left Puerto Montt the previous September we had left Putty in the care of our friends Hector and Tita. Hector and Tita own a small marina and recreational area in Huelmo. Huelmo is a rural area about 15 miles outside of Puerto Montt.




Road to Huelmo.

The plan was to take the Land Rover to Jamie, our mechanic, for some much needed TLC. Since purchasing it we had not thoroughly gone through the vehicle and we knew it was in need of some work. We found Jamie through the Land Rover Club of Chile and fortunately for us he is very knowledgeable when it comes to Land Rover’s, Defenders specifically. Jamie is Chilean. He lived many years in Canada and speaks perfect English. He acquired his training while working for Land Rover in the Falklands. There are not many Land Rover Defenders in Chile and we are very fortunate to have found him especially in Puerto Montt. We had met with Jamie before we left Puerto Montt and he was expecting us and a suitcase full of parts that I had brought back with me from my trip to the US.


Landy’s doctor outside his shop.

We detached the camper from the Land Rover and left it a nice sunny spot at Hector’s.


We had a great view of the marina.


This is a quincho. Hector has three on his property that he rents along with a couple small cabanas. The quinchos are eating halls with large fire pits for asados (Chile’s version of bbq).

With Landy left in the good hands of Jamie we set about getting Putty in good working order and set up for extended living. The owners before us lived on Putty for almost ten years but had done very little to make it “livable”. After living on a boat for 14 years we have become masters at making a small space more spacious.

We a lot of our time being social, something that is a bit lacking in the far south. Most of our first week was spent with Dwyer catching up before he took off for good back to the states. Our first weekend there, Hector and Tita hosted a Curanto in our honor. Curanto is a traditional dish from Chiloé, the island chain south of Puerto Montt. It is similar to a clambake but on steroids with numerous types of shellfish, meat, sausage, and vegetables. It was a big affair and was a real honor. It was the first, and only, one we have ever attended and we were not disappointed. In addition to the amazing food the entertainment was outstanding. Hector is a wonderful singer and he arranged for a friend to operate his very professional karaoke system. Everyone got in on the singing and dancing especially the Americans after many pisco sours.

A large part of our time was also spent with Raul. Raul, who I have mentioned in earlier blogs, is a dear friend. He was one of the first people we met when we arrived in Chile. He is an extremely kind hearted man that would do anything for anyone even to his own detriment. He is a Chilean who has travelled all of the world by land and sea. The stories of his experiences are unbelievable but once you know Raul you know they must be true. If it was not for Raul, we would not have gotten done everything that needed to be done. He is an amazing source for finding stuff and people to fix things and his endless patience for taxi-ing us around knows no bounds. Raul is The Man.


Dinner aboard Raul’s boat “Condor”.


How official looking are we?

We tried to take advantage of the beautiful warm weather and go for long walks along the shore and country roads. Just a short walk from Hector and Tita’s is a small organic farm run by a couple of Raul’s friends. The farm offers room and board in exchange for labor. It is a beautiful spot filled with interesting people and lots of animals. Most of the people working there are young kids from other parts of the globe who are travelling South America and are just passing through the area.


They surround the beds with glass wine bottles. The bottles are half filled with water which traps the heat from the day and maintains the temperature of the bed overnight.


I want to be the worker that had to empty all the bottles.

Not too far along the water in the other direction we stumbled upon a field with what looked like concrete sculptures. We were in the middle of nowhere and it looked like someone had cleared the field and erected modern stone pillars.



We were completely puzzled as to why anyone would go to all the trouble for the farm animals. It turns out that it was a historic site and the “artwork” were actually part of an archeological site. The indigenous people of the area used to tie their fishing nets to the posts, as the tide went out it would trap fish in the nets.


We did not catch and fish but we did capture a horse.

We ended up being in Puerto Montt for a month, originally we thought we would only be there for two weeks. Like everything it took twice as long. We were anxious to get back to Karma. The longest we had ever left the boat unattended was three days and then we were only a couple of hours away. Puerto Montt is three hours from Puerto Natales by plane!


From left to right: Hector, Tita, Ricardo, and Luz. They surprised us with a farewell toast.

Someone was very excited to have his Landrover back….




Total cheesecake!

The trip back to Puerto Natales from Puerto Montt by roadway is not easy. There are three ways to get from Puerto Montt to Puerto Natales by vehicle. The first is by ferry. The ferry takes three to four days depending on weather and allows you to stay in Chile the whole time. The ferry is not an option for us with Duke. Even if it was an option it would not have been our preference. We had already travelled by water to Puerto Natales and we were interested in what the land route had to offer. The other two ways are by “roadway”. Either way takes you through Argentina. The Carretera Austral through Chile is the scenic route. It is a combination of ferry and unpaved roads. You need to allow a couple of weeks for this trip. It takes you through some rugged terrain and mostly unpopulated areas. You are completely on your own if somethings goes wrong. We are up to this challenge when we are on Karma but we do not yet have the confidence in Putty to venture this far off the beaten path. We selected the least aggressive option, travelling north from Puerto Montt to the border crossing at Paso Samoré. We travelled the whole way south through Argentina until crossing back into Chile just north of Puerto Natales. The trip took us five days at an average speed of 40 mph. We were slow going because Putty decided to stop cooperating on our second day. We were very grateful that we did not take the road less travelled. At first we thought we had gotten bad fuel but that was not the case. We drove most of the way on four of our five cylinders and sometimes only three. Fortunately most off the way was either on flat roadway or downhill.

When we first started having our engine problems we were just under halfway and we were not sure if we should turn back and head straight for Jamie or keep going and take our chances. The problem was intermittent. It would clear up and we would decide to head for Puerto Natales. As soon as we would commit to heading south the engine would start acting up again. We literally drove the same stretch of highway back and forth for three hours completely indecisive as to what to do. Ultimately we decided it was a safer bet to keep heading to flatter terrain towards Puerto Natales because we did not think we would make it over the high mountain pass back into Chile if we headed north.

The first two days of our trip south were spent driving through Argentina’s Lakes district. It is a beautiful area with
majestic mountains and a chain of alpine lakes. It was like driving through the Swiss Alps. This is the region where the famous ski area of Bariloche is located. (Interesting tidbit, we quickly passed through Bariloche the day before Obama showed up for a family ski vacation).







The lush lakes district quickly turns to the arid tundra of Argentina’s Patagonia. Even though there is a whole lot of nothing, it is beautiful in its own way.



We had lots of guanaco, a distant cousin of the camel, to keep us company.





Obviously we made it and just in the nick of time…. Petr and Tracy were due to arrive in less than a week!


We celebrated our arrival in Puerto Coñsuelo with a bottle of champagne Jamie had given us to wish us luck. You can just make out Karma in the background.

Vessel Name: Karma
Vessel Make/Model: Sunward 48'
Hailing Port: West Palm Beach, FL
Crew: Clint, Reina & Duke
About: We've been working towards this for almost 10 years. It has been a dream with many challenges, all of which have made it more worth while. We are so grateful and excited to start this next chapter!
Extra: Twenty years fom now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the things that you did do. So sail away from the safe harbor, catch the trade winds in your sails, EXPLORE, DREAM, DISCOVER. -Mark Twain
Karma's Photos - Main
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Created 1 August 2016
Tom Comes to Visit Christmas 2015
57 Photos
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Land adventures with our camper.
1 Photo | 1 Sub-Album
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Ecuador
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Leaving the Caribbean behind and entering the Pacific
42 Photos
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This is a marine park and home to many turtles
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67 Photos
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21 Photos
Created 8 July 2012
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7 Photos
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7 Photos
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Pig
4 Photos
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29 Photos
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12 Photos
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Some lost photos
8 Photos
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Costanza
16 Photos
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8 Photos
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17 Photos
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Ile a Vache
58 Photos
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10 Photos
Created 27 February 2012
16 Photos
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23 Photos
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Created 30 January 2012
What we've been up to in G'Town
5 Photos
Created 17 January 2012
In and around Staniel Cay
10 Photos
Created 8 January 2012
Christmas & New Years 2011
67 Photos
Created 1 January 2012
Allens Cay to George Town
40 Photos
Created 10 December 2011
Heading to Miami
5 Photos
Created 14 November 2011
Leaving Sunset Bay Marina & on to the Bahamas
8 Photos
Created 12 November 2011
Getting ready for the big day! We moved Karma from her home of two years (WPB mooring) to Sunset Bay Marina in Stuart. Packed up the rest of our "crap", the stuff not coming with us & took it to Texas. After a nice visit with Reina's parents it was back to Stuart to get down & dirty & get Karma ready...
9 Photos
Created 9 November 2011

Karma in Motion

Who: Clint, Reina & Duke
Port: West Palm Beach, FL

Where are we?

Your destiny, is a result of your actions. Live by a code of conduct that will secure supreme hapiness and worldy joys; which are usually the little things.