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s/v Skylark
It's Always An Adventure
Fake Friend
Elizabeth (photo by Ed)
06/11/2012, Salt Whistle Bay, Mayreau, the Grenadines

you've noticed by now that all the more southerly Islands have colorful tenders owned and operated by the local men. While they're known as "boat boys", and some of them are young, most are grown men who make a living with their boats. In Salt Whistle Bay, Yellow Man is a white man with dreadlocks and a very native accent, which leads us to believe he was raised here and that's what his boat is named. My Desire delivers fresh bread in the mornings, though we typically buy our baguettes from Yellow Man (as well as ice). Roots is another of the boat names we've seen here, as well as Velocity-Lordog (go figure), Most Ras and One Love (obviously a reference to the Rastafarian beliefs). You saw the photo of the boat named Skylark in Bequia. Equal Rights was Captain Bob's boat in Soufriere, St. Lucia. But this one has been our favorite. Fake Friend doesn't seem to be a very inviting name if he's selling his goods to the cruisers, but we don't know the story of where the name comes from.

Socializing
Elizabeth
06/11/2012, Salt Whistle Bay, Mayreau, the Grenadines

Ed wonders why I am putting a photo of him on the blog when he looks "like a crazy man". We gave him a haircut the other day, which he desperately needed, but after wearing a hat all day with salt air, wind and sweat, this is the finished product. The haircut actually turned out well, but you wouldn't know it from this shot. He's talking with Ellen (s/v Miclo III) who along with her husband Rob, will be among some of the folks we'll enjoy spending more time with in Trinidad.

Pain Is Good BBQ Sauce
Elizabeth (photo by Ed)
06/11/2012, Salt Whistle Bay, Mayreau, the Grenadines

I'm going to have to find some of this stuff to keep on hand. It wasn't too hot at all but quite delicious.

Black Boy Tending Bar
Elizabeth (photo by Ed)
06/11/2012, Salt Whistle Bay, Mayreau, the Grenadines

Black Boy tending bar. Oftentimes, Ed or one of the other cruisers was behind the bar serving, especially while Black Boy was working on the bbq. A notebook served as a ledger for everyone's accounts.

BBQ in the Making
Elizabeth (photo by Ed)
06/11/2012, Salt Whistle Bay, Mayreau, the Grenadines

That's Black Boy in the yellow. The pork was incredibly tasty, tender, seasoned just right. It was a fun event and everyone seemed to have a great time. In addition to the pork, we all contributed a dish. Since most cruisers are heading to wherever they're hunkering down for hurricane season, our food stores are dwindling. For a good many cruisers, this is because they are leaving for home once their boats are secured or in our case, we're just trying to use up things we've had for awhile. It was an interesting pot luck for that reason but I must say, delicious. We brought a pasta salad, making it without many of our favorite ingredients but using up items we had sitting around. It was actually very good. We met lots of wonderful folks, many of who we look forward to seeing again. There were many Americans, a couple from Poland, a few from Scandinavia, several from the UK, Canada, and others from around the world who we didn't get to meet.

Black Boy and Debbie's Beach Bar
Elizabeth (photo by Ed)
06/11/2012, Salt Whistle Bay, Mayreau, the Grenadines

We came to Salt Whistle Bay because we wanted to visit, but also because we met friends Willie and Mark (s/v Liahona) in Bequia who invited us to come to a bbq they were sponsoring at Black Boy and Debbie's beach bar. Two pigs were to be roasted on a grill and a whole lot of cruisers (all friends or acquaintances of Mark and Willie's, or friends of friends) were planning on attending. As the weekend has approached, it's been fun and exciting welcoming in people who are coming from all over for the occasion. Willie holds water aerobics every morning next to their boat from 9-10 and this morning we counted 10 participants. I've joined them a couple of times but mostly I've been trying to keep my knee protected from too much exertion. I walk Luna with Ed each morning along the beach, take at least one swim a day without exerting too much pressure, and took a walk up and down very steep roads into Saline Bay the other day. That's been enough. The water aerobics have been something many of the cruisers look forward to. Mostly the women do it, but one of the men has been a regular and he says it helps his arthritis considerably. This photo is taken at the bar, and that's Willie on the left. I don't know who the woman is behind the bar; she was just helping out that day.

Tobago Cays
Elizabeth
06/11/2012, Mayreau, the Grenadines

We wish we'd explored more of these islands, but the circumstances weren't in our favor and it was crowded with charter boats when we visited. We'll definitely be back another day.

Skylark Through the Palms
Elizabeth
06/11/2012, Salt Whistle Bay, Mayreau, the Grenadines

We got a comment from our friend Chuck about the fish we caught, suggesting we goofed identifying it as a Kingfish. He felt pretty certain it was a Wahoo. We looked it up in our fish book and sure enough, we think he's right. Thanks for setting us straight, Chuck. We promise to send a photo of the lure we used whenever we get a chance. Our magic lure, that is. We continue to eat the fish, some of the tastiest we've ever had. The other day we walked up to the neighboring village where a woman was selling fresh fruits and vegetables along the road. We bought some local yams, plantain (which is a starchy banana, cooked like a potato), carrots and cabbage to make a fish stew in our pressure cooker. We added some leftover couscous with coconut milk. chicken broth left over from another meal, a can of ratatouille from Guadeloupe, fresh bay leaves from Dominica, garlic, clam sauce (left from our days in the states--and surprisingly OK), shallots, salt and pepper. After bringing the pot to a steaming boil, we reduced the heat and pressure-cooked it for 6 minutes. Very tasty; we were rather impressed with ourselves and sorry we hadn't invited anyone over for dinner to enjoy it with us. But then again, it was our first fish stew in the cooker, totally made up as we went along and might have been perfectly horrible.

For those who don't know a lot about pressure cookers, they are coveted by many cruisers for a number of reasons, such as how quickly foods cook which preserves propane for the stove and keeps the cabin cooler (example, 2 hours for a beef stew compared to 15 minutes with the pressure cooker), the small amount of liquid needed to cook (example, 2 cups of water compared to 1/2 cup in pressure cooker), the ability to cook a one-pot meal while underway, lock the lid in place for rough passages and have a meal ready to eat when you are), and also the ability to bake bread and desserts in it. Like I said, a cruiser's best friend.

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