s/v KOKOMO - Denny & Becky

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10 July 2017 | Sand Island, Wisconsin
08 July 2017
07 July 2017 | Sand Island, Wisconsin
29 June 2017
28 June 2017
27 June 2017
26 June 2017
24 June 2017
23 June 2017 | Sand Island Lighthouse
21 June 2017 | Sand Island Lighthouse
18 June 2017 | Bayfield, Wisconsin
13 May 2017 | Washington DC
12 May 2017 | Washington DC
09 May 2017 | Washington DC
07 May 2017 | Washington DC
06 May 2017 | Washington DC
01 May 2017 | Potomac River, Maryland
30 April 2017 | Potomac River, Maryland
30 April 2017 | Mouth of the Potomac River
29 April 2017 | 56 Miles from the mouth of the Chesapeake

Good Bye Lighthouse

10 July 2017 | Sand Island, Wisconsin
Becky/70 degrees, cloudy
After a month as lighthouse keepers, we are leaving in the morning and driving to Tacoma. Our experience here as been rewarding and memorable!

We will be making a few stops along the way home. We will see Steve and Rena, my college friend Deana and her husband Eric and our oldest son this weekend, DW! Looking forward to our visits!

Becky

Dinner

08 July 2017
Before we left, I canned white chicken chile, red meat chile & stew. Each night we have one of these for dinner. It has worked out great. After walking 4 miles neither us us wants to cook. So heating up one of the jars works perfect!

Denny told me this morning we have walked 100 miles!

Becky

Denny Blazing the Trail

07 July 2017 | Sand Island, Wisconsin
Becky/67 degrees, stormy
This is what Denny is doing on the 2 miles trail, cutting back the bushes. It's a hard job and his arms are tired when he is finished.

Yesterday we had a thunderstorm come through with hail. Wait a minute, it's after the 4th, it's suppose to be nice warm weather!

Becky

Stormy Weather

29 June 2017
Last night we had thunder, lightening and high winds. It was coming from the east which is right at us. Because of this, there is 1-3' swells and crashing on the shore and dock large waves.



The above photo was taken a few days ago when it was calm. Denny is drinking his morning coffee and checking out the sail boat anchored in front of the house.

Becky

Wreck of the Sevona

28 June 2017
Thunderstorms all day today and into the night. It reminds me of what happened here September 2, 1905.

It was a dark day in the history of the Apostle Islands. Early that morning, the steamship Sevona sought shelter from the storm among the islands. Clawing its way through the tempest, the ship struck a shoal northeast of Sand Island. Seven crew members drowned in sight of shore.

Recollections of a Passenger

Miss Spencer's story of the wreck is as follows:
"It makes me shudder to talk or think of the terrible experience through which we passed. About three o'clock in the morning Captain McDonald knocked at out door and told us that he was going to seek shelter, and for us to secure all breakable stuff in a place of safety, as when the boat put about she would toss badly.

It was only a short time before the captain came to our stateroom again and told us to dress. This we did and a little later two sailors came and accompanied us to the after end of the boat. We were instructed to put on life preservers, which we did. No one seemed to be specially frightened, but a 5:45 came the terrible crash which broke the vessel in two.

We got into the life boat at that time, but the captain and the men could not come aft owing to the break. He hailed us through the megaphone 'Hang on as long as you can.' We did so, but the sea was pounding so hard, that we finally got out of the small boat, and into the large vessel again, all congregating in the dining room which was still intact.

The big boat was pounding and tossing. Now a piece of the deck would go then a portion of the dining room, in which we were quartered. During all this time, the men forward could not get to us. Finally, at 11 o'clock everything seemed to be breaking at once, and by order of the chief engineer, we took to the small boat again.

One by one we piled into the boat, leaving six men behind us. I never heard such a heart rending cry as came from those six. 'For God's sake don't leave us,' they cried, so two of the men who were in our boat got out and helped the six men get the port boat over to the starboard side so they could launch it. These men then left in their boat and our and our men came back to our boat, and we put off.

It was a terrible fight to keep the small boat afloat. And to the skill of the second engineer, Adam Fiden, we certainly owe our lives. He is an expert sculler, and kept our boat right, when oars on the side were practically useless. We knew we were in danger, but we obeyed his orders implicitly, and he finally landed us safe and sound.

When the tug Currie returned from Sand Island Monday afternoon with the six men who were in boat number two, it was also learned that the bodies of Captain McDonald and Nels Severson, wheelsman, had been found on the beach at Sand Island. Justice Davis was instructed to go there and hold an inquest. Upon their return to the island two more bodies had been found, Louis Darwin, first mate, and the other one could not be identified. The bodies were brought to Bayfield and taken in charge by Undertaker Sense, and prepared for shipment. The body of Captain McDonald was sent to his home ln Northeast, Pa., Tuesday and two more of the bodies were shipped to Buffalo Wednesday.

Harry Magnet, a sailor on the steamer W.H.Mack, arrived in the city from Duluth Tuesday evening and identified his brother, Otto Willett, the last one of the bodies that washed ashore from the steamer Sevona. He took the remains of his brother to Cleveland Wednesday.

A search has been made for the three remaining bodies but none of them have been found yet.

The bodies of the second mate and two watchmen are still missing. The survivors of the Sevona were sent to their respective homes Wednesday evening after being in Bayfield since Monday. Their expenses were all paid by the owners of the boat. Valued at $250,000, and insured for $160,000, she was a total loss."

The bodies of the remaining victims were all eventually recovered. Lying just below the surface, the wreck of the Sevona was determined to be a hazard to navigation, and so the Army Corps of Engineers dynamited the wreck in the summer of 1909. Nonetheless, significant portions of the Sevona remain today, and the wreck is a popular destination for sport divers.

Kayaker's

27 June 2017
This morning Denny was picked up early and taken to the mainland. He is going to the grocery store for a few items and laundry mat to wash our bedding. So that leaves me to be the lighthouse keeper for the day.

The above photo is taken from the top of the lighthouse. It is a group of 17 that came for a tour. Not all fit into the photo. Fun group!

Today it's suppose to get up to 75 degrees! Woooohoooo, off come the woolies!

Becky

Ranger Station

26 June 2017
This is the house we are staying at. It is nice and simple. It has two bed rooms, one bathroom, kitchen with a frig & freezer and a two burner stove top. There is a living room with a heater. It is all run by solar panels. The hot water is instant hot (no hot water tank) and the heater is run with propane. When we first got here neither worked. My "fix it" Denny took each apart, cleaned them, put them back together and sure enough he got them running! There is a 12 volt plug we can charge our computer, phone and radios. There are lights, but we don't turn them on, we use the Luci Lights we brought. We also brought our plunger we use on the boat to do laundry and it is working well here. Just about all the comforts of home! There is a nice size shed for the lawn mower and storage.

Sand Island

24 June 2017
Having never been in this area, we are learning a lot about the Apostle Islands. Below is some information on where we are.

Sand Island is one of the Apostle Islands, in northern Wisconsin, in Lake Superior, and is part of the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore. It is located in the Town of Bayfield in Bayfield County. The Sand Island Lighthouse is located on the island.

In 1880, an engineer begin planning for the construction of the station. Sand Island Light was built from the same designs as three other lighthouses, but with the local Apostle Islands Brownstone instead of brick. The masons opened a hole for the cellar, and then began building the 26-by-30-foot dwelling, and added the 44-foot-tall tower in the Western corner of the structure. As the lighthouse neared completion, a fixed white Fourth Order Fresnel lens was placed in the lantern room. An acting keeper was appointed, and the light was first lit on September 25, 1881. The acting keeper, Charles Lederle, was appointed permanent keeper the next year.

Eventually, Lederle grew weary of the isolation that came with being the keeper of an island lighthouse and was reappointed the keeper of Two Harbors Light in Minnesota. The first assistant on nearby Outer Island, Emmanuel Luick, was offered the position of keeper at the Sand Island Light, and moved in with his wife Ella during January 1892. In 1901, Luick fell ill, leaving all duties at the lighthouse for Ella. Although she managed to do everything, the incident pointed out the dangers of having a single keeper on Sand Island. The Lighthouse Board authorized the addition of an assistant keeper and on May 22, 1902, Henry Irvine moved onto the island. In October 1903, Irvine was transferred to Devils Island. Luick appointed his wife as his acting assistant keeper, but the following day Edward Derry arrived on the island as the new assistant keeper. On April 30, 1904, Derry resigned, leaving Ella as acting assistant keeper once again. Ten days later, Frederick Hudson arrived on the island to take over as assistant keeper. On May 9, 1905, Ella boarded a steamer for nearby Bayfield and never returned to the island or her husband again.

Luick married again, this time to a woman named Oramill, and with her served the Sand Island Light for the next sixteen years. Over the course of that time, Luick went through twelve assistants, with the longest tenure being only two years. By the end of the 1910s, local shipping patterns had changing, and the Sand Island Light became less important. In 1921, the Lighthouse Board automated the tower, and Luick was reassigned to Grand Marais Light in Minnesota.

Trail

23 June 2017 | Sand Island Lighthouse
Becky/65 degrees, windy
We walk this 2 mile trail to the lighthouse and back each day. Denny in the morning, I'm in the afternoon. There are several areas that need mowing. Seems like Denny is mowing or weed whacking in the afternoon each day. When I get back to the house it is after five and we both talk about how much our feet hurt! After living on the boat for over seven years, we weren't on out feet much and it shows. I have two blisters and my shoes aren't new. Denny's cracked heels are slowly getting better. I think when we leave we will be in good shape.

Becky

Lookin' Good

21 June 2017 | Sand Island Lighthouse
Denny/70 degrees, sunny & buggy
As national park volunteers in Wisconsin we spend the day clearing the 2 mile trail and giving tours of the sand island lighthouse. For this we get a place to stay and a uniform. How does the saying go? You got to love a woman in uniform.

There you go Paul!

Denny

Sand Island Lighthouse

18 June 2017 | Bayfield, Wisconsin
Becky/67 degrees, windy, partly sunny
Here we are, our first day as lighthouse keepers! On this day we gave two couples a tour and did as best as we could! It is beautiful here! We have ranger uniforms and greet the campers. The house we are staying at is right on the water!

I'm at the top of the lighthouse where I can get a signal and will try and blog every few days.

Becky

The Valorous Unit Award

13 May 2017 | Washington DC
Becky/70 degrees, cloudy
We learned today our son Drew was awarded the Valorous Unit Award! We are very proud and excited for him. Below is the description of the award:

The Valorous Unit Award (VUA) is the second highest United States military unit decoration which may be bestowed upon a military unit after the Presidential Unit Citation (PUC). The VUA is awarded by the United States Army to units of the United States Armed Forces or cobelligerent nations which display extraordinary heroism in action against an armed enemy of the United States on or after 3 August 1963. The unit degree of heroism required is considered the equivalent of the individual degree of heroism required for the Silver Star which is awarded for gallantry in action.

Way to go Drew!

Becky

Baseball Game

12 May 2017 | Washington DC
Becky/76 degrees, sunny
Denny's brother, Michael, along with his wife Allison, took us to the Washington Nationals verses Baltimore Orioles. It was so much fun, with all the excitement, lights and front row seats! We won 7-6 and it was so much fun!

Becky

Sand Island Lighthouse

09 May 2017 | Washington DC
Becky/80 degrees, sunny & beautiful
We will be lighthouse keepers for one month starting in the middle of June. It is the Sand Island Lighthouse. One of the Apostil Island lighthouses built in 1881, Lake Superior, Wisconsin. We are very excited about this volunteer position and we will blog about our experience.

Here is some history:
Sand Island lighthouse, near the western end of the Apostle Island chain, was occupied for a shorter period than any of the archipelago's other lights. Built in 1881, it was the first of the group to be automated, in 1921.

Considered by many to be one of the most beautiful lighthouses on Lake Superior, the structure was built from sandstone quarried right at the building site. The design of the lighthouse was influenced by the Gothic style, popular during the Victorian period. The light tower begins as a square rising from the northwest corner of the dwelling, then gracefully flows into an octagon surmounted by the lantern and walkway. Carved wood trim decorates the steeply sloped gable end of the quarters. A fourth-order Fresnel lens produced a fixed white light from the top of the 44-foot tall tower.


Becky

Family in the Bahamas

07 May 2017 | Washington DC
Becky/72 degrees, cloudy & rainy
Below is a video of our time with our family in the Bahamas. We had such a nice visit!



Life is good on Kokomo!

Becky
Vessel Name: Kokomo
Vessel Make/Model: Sabre 425
Hailing Port: Tacoma, Washington
Crew: Denny & Becky Flannigan
About:
After ten years of planning a trip around the world, we have given up our life on land to head to bluer pastures with the hopes of staying young as long as possible. Our mission is to have fun while moving about the earth. [...]
Extra: We have two boys and two grandson's and several friends and family of all ages. Our hope is that those we know will decide to spend some time with us. Life is enjoyed most when you share it with those your closest to.
Home Page: http://www.kokomosailing.com/
Social:
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Denny & Becky in the Bahamas

Who: Denny & Becky Flannigan
Port: Tacoma, Washington

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