L'Eau Commotion Westabout

An (other) attempt to sail non stop Westabout around the world

Vessel Name: L'Eau Commotion
Vessel Make/Model: Northshore 38
Hailing Port: Brisbane Australia
Crew: Bill Hatfield
17 October 2017 | 650 Miles SE of St. Helena ( and 650 Miles West of Walvis Bay, Namibia )
16 October 2017 | 805 Miles to St. Helena
15 October 2017 | 960 Miles to St. Helena
15 October 2017 | 960 Miles to St. Helena
14 October 2017 | 1100 Miles To St. Helena
13 October 2017 | 1235 Miles to St. Helena
12 October 2017 | 1385 Miles South East of St. Helena
12 October 2017
12 October 2017
12 October 2017
12 October 2017 | 160 Miles West of Varkrug South Africa
11 October 2017 | 150 Miles Northwest of Cape Town South Africa
10 October 2017 | 35 Miles West of the Cape of Good Hope
09 October 2017 | 65 Miles South of Cape Aguhlas
08 October 2017 | 120 Miles South East of Cape Aguhlas
07 October 2017 | 260 Miles East of Cape Aguhlas
06 October 2017 | 375 Miles East of Cape Aguhlas
05 October 2017 | 470 Miles East of Cape Aguhlas
05 October 2017 | 205 Miles East of Port Elizabeth South Africa
04 October 2017 | 300 Miles East of Port Elizabeth
Recent Blog Posts
18 January 2018 | 25 Miles Cape Horn Bearing 034T

That's It Folks

8:00pm Thursday 18th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) On checking the rigging I found that the inner or lower shroud on the Starboard side had started to fail at the spreader and as such I can no longer continue on this trip. As this has just happened I have not formulated a plan of action but will let you know once the weather gods have been consulted.

18 January 2018 | 30 Miles SW Cape Horn

Shelter

6:45pm Thursday 18th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) All systems are good but I may temporarily turn back behind the Horn islands as full gale forecast for next four days. The rising seas could threaten a knockdown and progress into that wind is marginal at best.

18 January 2018 | 25 Miles South West of Cape Horn

Cape Horn

4:00pm Thursday 18th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) Finally passed the Longitude of Cape Horn at 7:17am ( UTC 1117 ) after a sleepless night. The wind was light and favourable requiring a fair amount of sail so the tendency was always to round up and head towards the many islands ( and rocks ) to the North West of the South East track. I actually saw Cape Horn last night at around 8:00pm distant 32 Miles and again in the early dawn around 3:00am but then heavy cloud and solid drizzle becoming rain set in and this photo was taken at the first time it reappeared briefly through the murk. It was taken from about six miles away. Very soon the wind started to back from the general North to the West and increased to 30 odd knots. As I was putting the last furl in the jib and a double reefed main the AIS sounded and a 199 m cargo ship ( Name and address supplied! ) announced a converging course from 6 miles to the West . I spoke to the Officer of the watch and he nicely agreed to alter course to Starboard , and by a fair amount by no w, so that he passed ahead comfortably by about 1/3 mile. Of course in these conditions he did not become visible until about 3 miles away. The conditions are now uncomfortable with a rising swell and we are virtually hove to making less than 2 knots heading 200T. All OK but must go now. --------------050308050304030901020800--

17 January 2018 | 38 Miles to Cape Horn

Land Ahoy!

4:30pm Wednesday 17th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) An hour or so ago it seemed about the right time to go over to a Port tack so all rugged up ( including jeans and socks ) we switched course. Not expecting to see much what with the cloud and a few showers about I scanned the Western horizon, checked, yes land and behind and to the left the definite shape of Isla Hornos. The breeze is expected to veer more to the North and weaken a little so we are now powering on almost on course into a still strong current. The sky is now almost 100% blue and the sun is doing what it does best.Last night was a different story. Reefed right down and with a stronger current round the 1000 metre depth and an uncomfortable chop we were going nowhere but at least here was no jarring or banging. Albatross and Mother Carys Chickens to spare, the latter thankfully off to find more exciting weather than the solid but comfortable breeze that should get us abeam the Horn in time for a photo early tomorrow.

16 January 2018 | 62 Miles from Cape Horn

Route Planning

4:30pm Tuesday 16th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) I had planned to be at Cape Horn in the middle of January but that came and went 4 1/2 hours ago and none of the usual signs of getting any closer are apparent. No day trippers out of Puerto Williams, no joy flighters out of Punta Arenas and no Frank. Mind you it is his day to look after the kids and the missus, whom he affectionately calls Lady Frankie, prefers to providder locally from organic outlets. She is not one of the wandering kind especially on a day like today with poor vis a slight drizzle an almost flat sea and little wind. Just ask the guys and gels out of Narromine or Temora and they'll tell you that's not the sort of weather to be caught in kilometres from a cosy bunk. I could have left Southport on the Sunday which would have got me there on schedule but Border Force don't do Sundays, or Saturdays for that matter ( they have families too ), of course Fridays are out and I was still shopping on Thursday. However I feel I can make up this day once I get out of this head current and into the North going Humboldt. As I was about to post this the breeze finally arrived and just to be on the cautious side I chucked in a couple of extra rolls on the jib with the expectation of 25 knots hard on the nose tonight. So far so good.

15 January 2018 | 99 Miles to Cape Horn

Nervous Nineties

4:00pm Monday 15th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) Actually 99.9 miles to a point 56 00'S and 67 12.7'W which is about 3 miles South of the lighthouse of Islas Hornos itself. Not that I have any intention of getting this close it's just that if I place a waypoint a fair way off there is always the temptation to cut it fine by going on the wrong side. At about the time Sir Frank ( not his real name ) would have arrived home to his long suffering missus the stiff Sou'Wester long predicted set in with a vengeance so the main was double reefed and just a glimpse of the jib left showing. Though only initially making one knot out of the area named " dangerous overfalls " it was good to be getting clear of that North going Current confirmed by several methods at over three knots. No wonder there were so many shipwrecks in days gone by - I was nearly one of them. Figuratively of course but in the dark night with abrupt wind changes it kept my on my toes, including my big one, which is healing nicely. This Southerly course continued u ntil a late breakfast when the wind veered more to the North West and more sail was set till now in the mid afternoon it is just a gentle breeze more from the North. If the wind takes me that way I may get a photo op of the Horn but if not I can always photo shop one from last time I was by this way.

That's It Folks

18 January 2018 | 25 Miles Cape Horn Bearing 034T
8:00pm Thursday 18th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) On checking the rigging I found that the inner or lower shroud on the Starboard side had started to fail at the spreader and as such I can no longer continue on this trip. As this has just happened I have not formulated a plan of action but will let you know once the weather gods have been consulted.

Shelter

18 January 2018 | 30 Miles SW Cape Horn
6:45pm Thursday 18th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) All systems are good but I may temporarily turn back behind the Horn islands as full gale forecast for next four days. The rising seas could threaten a knockdown and progress into that wind is marginal at best.

Cape Horn

18 January 2018 | 25 Miles South West of Cape Horn
4:00pm Thursday 18th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) Finally passed the Longitude of Cape Horn at 7:17am ( UTC 1117 ) after a sleepless night. The wind was light and favourable requiring a fair amount of sail so the tendency was always to round up and head towards the many islands ( and rocks ) to the North West of the South East track. I actually saw Cape Horn last night at around 8:00pm distant 32 Miles and again in the early dawn around 3:00am but then heavy cloud and solid drizzle becoming rain set in and this photo was taken at the first time it reappeared briefly through the murk. It was taken from about six miles away. Very soon the wind started to back from the general North to the West and increased to 30 odd knots. As I was putting the last furl in the jib and a double reefed main the AIS sounded and a 199 m cargo ship ( Name and address supplied! ) announced a converging course from 6 miles to the West . I spoke to the Officer of the watch and he nicely agreed to alter course to Starboard , and by a fair amount by no w, so that he passed ahead comfortably by about 1/3 mile. Of course in these conditions he did not become visible until about 3 miles away. The conditions are now uncomfortable with a rising swell and we are virtually hove to making less than 2 knots heading 200T. All OK but must go now. --------------050308050304030901020800--

Land Ahoy!

17 January 2018 | 38 Miles to Cape Horn
4:30pm Wednesday 17th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) An hour or so ago it seemed about the right time to go over to a Port tack so all rugged up ( including jeans and socks ) we switched course. Not expecting to see much what with the cloud and a few showers about I scanned the Western horizon, checked, yes land and behind and to the left the definite shape of Isla Hornos. The breeze is expected to veer more to the North and weaken a little so we are now powering on almost on course into a still strong current. The sky is now almost 100% blue and the sun is doing what it does best.Last night was a different story. Reefed right down and with a stronger current round the 1000 metre depth and an uncomfortable chop we were going nowhere but at least here was no jarring or banging. Albatross and Mother Carys Chickens to spare, the latter thankfully off to find more exciting weather than the solid but comfortable breeze that should get us abeam the Horn in time for a photo early tomorrow.

Route Planning

16 January 2018 | 62 Miles from Cape Horn
4:30pm Tuesday 16th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) I had planned to be at Cape Horn in the middle of January but that came and went 4 1/2 hours ago and none of the usual signs of getting any closer are apparent. No day trippers out of Puerto Williams, no joy flighters out of Punta Arenas and no Frank. Mind you it is his day to look after the kids and the missus, whom he affectionately calls Lady Frankie, prefers to providder locally from organic outlets. She is not one of the wandering kind especially on a day like today with poor vis a slight drizzle an almost flat sea and little wind. Just ask the guys and gels out of Narromine or Temora and they'll tell you that's not the sort of weather to be caught in kilometres from a cosy bunk. I could have left Southport on the Sunday which would have got me there on schedule but Border Force don't do Sundays, or Saturdays for that matter ( they have families too ), of course Fridays are out and I was still shopping on Thursday. However I feel I can make up this day once I get out of this head current and into the North going Humboldt. As I was about to post this the breeze finally arrived and just to be on the cautious side I chucked in a couple of extra rolls on the jib with the expectation of 25 knots hard on the nose tonight. So far so good.

Nervous Nineties

15 January 2018 | 99 Miles to Cape Horn
4:00pm Monday 15th January 2018 ( UTC-4 ) Actually 99.9 miles to a point 56 00'S and 67 12.7'W which is about 3 miles South of the lighthouse of Islas Hornos itself. Not that I have any intention of getting this close it's just that if I place a waypoint a fair way off there is always the temptation to cut it fine by going on the wrong side. At about the time Sir Frank ( not his real name ) would have arrived home to his long suffering missus the stiff Sou'Wester long predicted set in with a vengeance so the main was double reefed and just a glimpse of the jib left showing. Though only initially making one knot out of the area named " dangerous overfalls " it was good to be getting clear of that North going Current confirmed by several methods at over three knots. No wonder there were so many shipwrecks in days gone by - I was nearly one of them. Figuratively of course but in the dark night with abrupt wind changes it kept my on my toes, including my big one, which is healing nicely. This Southerly course continued u ntil a late breakfast when the wind veered more to the North West and more sail was set till now in the mid afternoon it is just a gentle breeze more from the North. If the wind takes me that way I may get a photo op of the Horn but if not I can always photo shop one from last time I was by this way.
L'Eau Commotion's Photos - Main
1 Photo
Created 23 July 2017
1 Photo
Created 23 July 2017
1 Photo
Created 22 July 2017
Northshore 38
1 Photo
Created 14 September 2016
No Photos
Created 14 September 2016