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Lemons Way
The continuing adventures of a cruising sailor/family lawyer, his wife (also a lawyer), and their young children.
To New Bern
06/12/2008

Today the project was traveling to and from New Bern in the motor home. It is 29 miles from Oriental. I got prescriptions filled, we picked up some things at the hardware store, we parked outside the theater for awhile attempting to fix my internet and talking to Will at Hydrovane. We picked up other and sundry supplies in the "big city." Frankly, it was a nice break from the monotonously calm bliss of Oriental. On the way back we stopped and picked up 20 feet of 316 stainless steel tube which we will use to reinforce the bimini so that it will handle the solar panels and become like a hybrid arch. Since we have been driving a scooter and everyone knows everyone in town, the lady asked us how we were going to get the tubing home. I pointed across the street to the 34 foot Rebounder, the perfect vehicle to transport such a long span of tubing. And that we did, to Deaton Yachts, where Tropical Dreamer is located. Unexpectedly, they determined to move the vessel to a new location after 7 months to make room for a big powerboat. We watched as they picked her up with the travelift and moved her to a corner of the yard, perfect, as the foreman said, for the motor home to cozy up into. So on we go.

The Wire Arrives
Keith, HH
06/11/2008, Deaton Yachts, Oriental, NC

I had to buy wire. Wire is expensive. West Marine wanted well over $600 for the wire I needed. Matt found it on the internet for 1/4 that. 12 volt wind turbines produce a lot of power when the wind is big. That power requires a large gauge wire to pass through to charge the battery. Wire is made of copper. Copper is expensive these days. Lugging the box with the spools of wire from the parts department at Deaton to the boat was a struggle. I used the scooter for part of the way. It won't be long before you see pictures of wire being strung. Until then, we are moving forward slowly but surely.

I'm Not Really Smiling Inside
Keith, hot and humid
06/11/2008, The Most Difficult Place to Get To In Tropical Dreamer

In order to get to this spot, I had to go below deck into the rear cabin, I had to crawl into the back of the back cabin, I had to unscrew a hatch in the rear, crawl through that hatch, across the open area at the back of the boat, into literally the farthest corner of the sailboat. Once wedged in there, my job was to screw in the bolts that hold the base of the Hydrovane. It was the hardest job I've done physically and mentally since before I became a lawyer and everything I've done here so far prepared me to run that gauntlet. So that smile you see is in reality me thinking "get me the *** out of this hole." In fact, you can just about see me thinking, take the *** picture already and get down there and do what you need to do to the screws so I can get out of here.

06/10/2008

Neice Sydney asked for a picture with me and the dogs. Anne requires about 1/2 hour of cuddle time every day or else she starts looking down. Jake, the perfect traveling dog, is just happy to be with us and adventuring.

The Motorhome Returns To Deaton For the Morning
Keith
06/10/2008

We finally reached the point where certain heavy hardware had to be driven to the boat as it is too bulky or heavy to be transported on the scooter. We cranked up the generator, pulled out the awning, and had the air conditioners running. It was a cold refuge from an otherwise brutally hot day. We may bring the Rebounder back just for the confort it brings. It's also a pretty cool view with all the sailboats around us.

Morning Before Boat Work
06/10/2008, Oriental, NC

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Cuddly Pair Of Retrievers
Keith
06/09/2008, Oriental, NC

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Unfortunate Incident Involving A Can Of Chicken Broth
Keith
06/09/2008, Oriental, NC

I used this chicken broth to flavor rice last night. Last night was Jun 2008. It wasn't pretty. We had to open all the windows in the Rebounder for about 1/2 an hour just to air the place out. We figured out that I must have taken this can from my house (where it had been sitting) to the motorhome and then let it sit in all weather conditions (Tucson summers) until last night. I was actually going to try and make a go of it, but Matt noticed the rancid smell wafting through the motorhome and inquired how far was I going to go with it. I was ashamed to admit the truth. Now I have to check each can before opening it. We went across the street for Pizza tonight.

06/09/2008

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Progress
Keith, H & H
06/09/2008, Oriental

What you are seeing are the mock-ups for the wind generator mast and supports in the rear and the Hydrovane mock-up in the front. This actual equipment is heavy and bulky enough so that it can't just be set up on the boat right out of the box. The brackets need to be learned and mocked (so to speak) and the metal bars (we are using plastic pipe) measured and then cut to fit the boat. It took numerous steps to get to this point and there are numerous steps before actual installation. Mind you this is just the supporting equipment. The actual wind turbine and the Hydrovane are being stored safely in the boxes and will not be installed until last. I'm told my Mr. Deaton (of Deaton Yachts) that this has been the hottest weather in the last 50 years. Getting this far in these weather conditions has been a struggle, a sweaty uncomfortable struggle, but we're making progress. Paul at the hardware store lent us his hot air gun because they didn't sell one. We needed that to take off the old port of origin letters. The new US Coast Guard documentation for Tropical Dreamer lists Tucson, Arizona as my port of origin so that is what needs to be lettered onto the back of the boat. How I managed to sail from Tucson to here will be an interesting topic of conversation during the cruising. We are meeting the guy who makes boat lettering in a little over half an hour at his shop across the street from where we are staying. Then, an hour later, I've got a telephonic court hearing at the Juvenile Court.

 

 
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Port: Tucson, Arizona
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