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Lemons Way
The continuing adventures of a cruising sailor/family lawyer, his wife (also a lawyer), and their young children.
Anyone Up For A Run On The Beach
08/29/2008

I have really enjoyed the times we've anchored on one side of a shelter island and then walked across to the Atlantic beach on the other side. This morning the water was calm and it was low tide so there was plenty of beach for the dogs to play on and for me to meander along. There are no hotels on this beach and no rules prohibiting dogs. Now they are all tired out and resting on the boat. I've got to do a huge load of dishes and then we may tour the Carnegie mansion ruins before heading off to Florida.

Hike Through Mozzie Infested But Beautiful Forest
nice
08/29/2008, Cumberland Island in far southern Georgia

As soon as it was light we dingied back to the National Park docks and started hiking to the beach, about 1/2 mile from the docks. The hike went through a forest the likes of which I have never seen. Even though I applied deet, the mozzies were overpowering. Big ones. I even applied repellent on the dogs it was so bad. I got bit several times and was walking double time to keep them off of me. The dogs didn't care. They'd been cooped up on the sailboat for days without much of a chance to run free and they relished the experience.

Waiting For The Sun To Rise
nice cool morning
08/29/2008, the picture is 50 nm north, we are 50 nm south

It's 6:45 in the morning and we are still waiting for the sun to rise. When I started my present set of travels back in May (four months ago) the sun was up before I was. Now I often have an hour of dark before the light. Fall is coming even if it is still hot and dare I say it is getting cooler at night even as I go south. I cruised farther in one day yesterday than I have before in either this boat or Singmeaway. A favorable current 1/2 of the way helped considerably. I've been fighting current a lot of the way through Georgia. I think I've been on longer passages than the 10+ hour one I did yesterday, but this boat is faster than the Catalina 25 and in a long day, outruns it. I passed a place or two I should have probably stopped and visited, but I'm sick of visiting quaint towns. Right now I'm about distance. We'll stop when we get down into Florida some. Turns out the anchorage I found myself at last night is attached to a really cool national park.

Cumberland National Docks
Keith, typical summer weather, hot and humid, but nice
08/28/2008, Southern Georgia, USA

I'm just down the way from a nice dock. I took the dogs there at dusk and this is the best picture I could get. It was too dark to hike too far even though this is the starting point for a lot of good hiking. The dogs will love it. But for tonight at least they got to run around and do their thing. We arrived back at the boat in darkness and I made a nice dinner which I did not photograph thank you - but it was good - especially the nutty bar dessert. I can still hear thunder from the system in the area. Hopefully it won't rain on us. We've been making long, 50 mile passages on the ICW this week. Tiring, but enjoyable. Florida is only a few miles away from this anchorage. Georgia has definitely taken the prize for the most remote ICW experience, but it was an experience I will never forget.

Long Days On the ICW Are Eased By Good Food Along The Way
fine
08/28/2008, Some Anchorage Between Hilton Head and Jacksonville

It's been a several day trek across the coast of Georgia. Georgia has the most rugged remote coast in the whole ICW. The shallows here are noteworthy but the open water has also been nice. Since the conditions on the water are often difficult, a nice meal really means something. Maybe that's why I keep showing the food. Maybe it just gives me something to do while I'm waiting for tonight's pasta to get done.

Sunset 50 miles further into Georgia
nice after all
08/27/2008

You'd think its all sunrises, sunsets, and food, but those are just some of the highlights. There are hard times too, but I try not to dwell on them. Today was a long trek mostly against the current through lots of open water with thunderstorms threatening. Tonight's evening activity was dinner, watch the exquisite sunset, shower using the outside shower (anther great and liberating experience), shave, fix the blocked marine head (you don't even want to know, but at least I did it myself and didn't require a marina mechanic and a week of bucket use), drag Jake inside for the night, blog, and sleep.

Sunrise At Remote Georgia Anchorage
sticky
08/27/2008

I took off rather late in the morning from Hilton Head and put in over 40 nautical miles (more in regular car miles). I was tired when I arrived. The internet was pretty spotty so I couldn't upload any other pictures. This is a sense of what it looked like while I was getting ready to depart this morning. We're presently anchored another 40+ nautical miles down the ICW. Lots of open water today. We're anchored in a safe place with the possibility of dinging in to shore. Time to make dinner.

45 Miles From Hilton Head And The Eating's Fine
Keith, nice - no more ac, but ok
08/26/2008, Some creek along the ICW

After a wonderful day of cruising I found myself at a beautiful anchorage just off the ICW. Most of this is leftovers, but it was so good, Tucson soul food.

The Greatest Song In The World, Tribute
Tenacious D
08/25/2008, at the site below... after the end of another song

Paste this into your browser - it starts about about 35 seconds into the video if you can forward to that point.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suXpucoTWNY

The Modern Chartplotter Is Installed
Keith, variable, getting hot and humid again
08/25/2008, Hilton Head

It's Monday morning and the mechanic came early to finish up so I can mozie along. This was the chartplotter I salvaged from the Catalina 25. There are pictures of it navigating me across the Sea of Cortez last year if you go back to that time in the blog. As you can see it is far superior to the 1995 technology that came with the old magellin. It comes with US maps that go into great detail and even include many of the major nav aids. That is going to help considerably as I head the last 500 miles south down the east coast of Georgia and Florida. If I want, I can buy map cards for the Bahamas or anyplace else in the world and it will chart my boat's position via GPS on the maps. This baby is fully programmable so I can customize the screens to match the exact data I want for each situation. It is lightening fast, far more accurate, and just a real asset to cruising safety. Look how it plots my exact position in this creek off of the waterway. The magellen couldn't get closer than a 30 mile view without cards that I couldn't find. This thing will zoom in to 50 feet, but that wouldn't be of much use to me except maybe in heavy fog and even then I wouldn't trust it. It uses the waas technology that airplanes use for their gps tracking. After installing the chartplotter, we did a few odds and ends to get the boat in ship shape. I ran the engine for about 20 minutes to make sure everything was working and not leaking or overheating. Now we're good to go. I've literally fixed/serviced everything I know of to fix so the boat is pretty much in perfect order. I'm sure that won't last long, but its feels good for now. I'll clean up and get it ready to travel, pay my bill this afternoon, and head out either later this afternoon or first thing tomorrow morning. Maybe I can get a ride to the grocery to provision and perhaps a dinner on the town before heading off. Why rush.

 

 
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