Little Green Boat

Spruce left the UK in 2011, arrived in SE Asia during 2015. Finished land/air touring in Asia. Afloat again and getting ready to head east to Raja Ampat and on to Japan and Alaka in 2018.

19 August 2017 | Sipidan & Mabul - Sabah - Malaysian Borneo
19 August 2017
19 August 2017
19 August 2017
19 August 2017
19 August 2017
19 August 2017
12 August 2017 | Rivers - Borneo
12 August 2017
12 August 2017
10 August 2017 | Turtle Islands - Malaysian Borneo
10 August 2017
10 August 2017
10 August 2017
10 August 2017
05 August 2017 | Kudat - Borneo
05 August 2017
05 August 2017
02 August 2017 | Kudat - Borneo
19 July 2017 | Papar - Sabah - Malaysian Borneo

Dive! Dive! Dive!

19 August 2017 | Sipidan & Mabul - Sabah - Malaysian Borneo
Andy & Sue
Three days with time spent beneath the waves gave an insight into local marine life. Two dives on a reef local to our anchorage, one dive at Mabul, two at Kapalai and three plunges at Sipadan gave a reasonable spectrum of what can be found in Sabah, Malaysia’s eastern most Province. This shoal of Big-Eye Snappers was happy to come close to slow moving divers.

19 August 2017
Interesting colourful smaller creatures positively glow: this one a Nudibranch, a sort of slug-like animal, is but a single example of many different types seen at Mabul. The fronds on its back are gills. There are artificial structures at Mabul, which certainly attract a wide variety of creatures. The “dive resort” complex is a stilt village built on the reef at the site of a former fishing village. We are not fans of these types of development; it would be far more ecologically sound to bring divers by boat from properly serviced centres on shore.

19 August 2017
A much bigger animal, a Crocodile Fish, shown here, blends into the background, camouflaged to seem like coral bedecked stones. It would be easy to swim straight past if you did not have your eye tuned in to spot these weird fish.

19 August 2017
An old favourite is the Clown fish. Several different species bathing luxuriously in the fronds of exotic Anemones abound. Sizes vary from tiny to around 100mm: a feisty fish that faces challengers fiercely, but is always ready to seek the relative safety of its stinging host.

19 August 2017
Larger still are these chaps, securely wedged into crevices to avoid the current sweeping them away. The bigger animals at Sipadan are mainly confined to Turtles, Napoleon Wrasse, Jacks lurking in the periphery of visibility and …

19 August 2017
… Sharks. Mainly Reef White Tips but it is excellent to see Sharks in these waters have not all been slaughtered to sacrifice their fins for the Chinese market. So far, in SE Asia, sharks seen have been very few. The elderly lone specimen seen three months ago in Tioman Island was the pride of the local dive shop; he was, however, a sorry comparison with those seen in previous years around the Pacific reefs and Islands. Sipadan showed signs of being a much more balanced eco-system, although smaller fishes were in fewer numbers than we expected. That might be due to the large numbers of sharks and other predators located at this oceanic pinnacle island.
Vessel Name: Spruce
Vessel Make/Model: Hallberg Rassy 42 - Enderlein Design
Hailing Port: Portsmouth, UK
Crew: Sue & Andy
About: Sue is an artist, plays the flute and guitar. Andy enjoys technical challenges and hoped to learn to speak more Spanish. Unsuccessfully:-( Maybe this year?
Extra: During 2013 and 2014 we sailed across the Pacific to New Zealand and then Australia. 2015-16 brought us north into Asia. The past few years cruising has enabled us to visit many countries, meet lots of interesting people and to understand the world a little better.
Home Page: http://www.sailblogs.com/member/littlegreenboat
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Spruce's Photos - Trek to La Ciudad Perdida
Photos 1 to 81 of 81 | Main
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No room inside
A view on the early trail from a high vantage point
Mules hauling food ahead to the Cabana where we
Kate & Marlyn on the first day
A swim before the uphill commenced
Early part of the trail
Local cattle, a species from Africa we were told
First night
Mules patiently waiting for the day
Marlyn & another member of Magic Tours staff working in the cook-house
A clay oven/stove - four at this camp and all different sizes
Muleteer urging his charges onwards and upwards
A farmstead beside the trail
More mules lugging food and equipment. No mechanised transport on this trail.
Enrique (nicknamed Pinochio) preparing food. If he said the trail was going to be "a little bit uphill" then get your climbing gear ready :-)
Packing sacks to load onto the mules
Cabana 1 - the only hammock accommodation, thankfully.
Mule early in the morning ready for loading
Early morning light
The group heads out
Kate ready for some knee punishment on the downhill bits
Another swim - we usually had one per day. Left to Right: Orla, Thomas, Andrea, Rachael and Mikey
Not sure what these were but didn
An ancient Native Indian burial site, probably plundered many years ago
A rest at a summit. Fresh fruit to moisten the mouth
Inside a Kogi (Native Indian) home
Inside a Kogi (Native Indian) home
Frog sleeping during the day
A Kogi mother and children
A Kogi child
Probably a beautiful butterfly to be...don
A Kogi village
Our guide, Jesus, briefing us on the Kogi culture. The mortar and pestle artifact in front of him is used to hold lime which is used to mix with and chew cocoa leaves. The mild cocaine dose released assists the Kogi to combat sickness at high altitude, hunger and keep them moving in a hostile environment.
Mosquito nets over bunk beds at Cabana 2
Trying to dry wet gear in the late afternoon rainy period
One of the weird and colourful bugs en route
River flowing during a comparatively dry period
A Kogi woman weaving a strap for a mochila, a bag to hang over the shoulder)
Entertaining ourselves in the evening.
A plant seen quite often in the forest
Mikey and Andrea lead the way across the river. Orla and guide, Jesus, following. These rivers can quickly increase in depth making crossings hazardous. Crossings were made before the afternoon rains and melt-water emerged from the Sierra Nevada snow-cap
Another plant
Andy and Lena in a hollow tree
Fungi on a tree...not quite all in focus but you get the idea
Another strange fruit on a tree at the Lost City...not sure what it is?
Large palms not removed from the site of the Lost City when they cleared the site in the 1970s and 80s
A Map-Stone. The small star bursts (if you can see them) are settlements and the long lines are the river routes.
A Kogi Native Indian man walked up the main pathway - it gave an air of historical times
One of many routes up to Ciudad Perdida
One of the horse fly type of bugs - the proboscis goes straight through trousers and they aren
Its was all up from here
We tink this is know as a Number 88 butterfly but can
Looking down on the lower levels of La Ciudad Perdida from the higher part.
Andy meets the one of the local army detachment. Security of tourists has been a high priority for the Colombian authorities since the trail to La Ciudad Perdida re-opened. These chaps are heavily armed and very friendly to tourists.
Andy with the vista behind. We needed to be up there early before it clouded over, but the insects were vicious.
Our group enjoying the scenery
The "throne" occupied by the Shaman while passing judgement and giving advice to the citizens.
View from the city
River water had to be purified before filling our water bottles for the day
The five day part of our group Left to Right: Jesus (Guide), Lena, Andrea, Thomas, Ibra, Scott
A bonus swim for a few of us on the penultimate day. Enrique took time out from kitchens duties to take us down a steep hill to a fantastic waterfall. Mikey emerges from the torrent.
Maeve & Rachel desperately hang onto their bikinis
Joanie avoids being bowled over
Another strange plant
The final furlong, almost finished. Left to ight: Kate, Joanie, Maeve, Rachel, Orla, Mikey, Mark, Andy
This spider was about 6" (150mm) across from leg tip to leg tip...nobody was willing to put their finger close for size perspective.
One of the many beautiful butterflies. They didn
A rest at the top. L to R: Orla, Enrique, Rachel
A wasp nest on a leaf
The cow wasn
Another pretty plant
At the finish: Joanie
At the finish: Rachel
At the finish: Orla
At the finish: Maeve
At the finish: Mark
At the finish: Mikey
Packing the mule sacks for the next group to depart
At the finish: Kate
The hardest working member of the team. The mules carry food and other essentials along the trail leaving the hikers to carry only light weight packs.
 
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