The Sailabout of Mauliola

18 October 2016 | Nuku Hiva
11 October 2016 | Fatu Hiva, Marquesas
08 October 2016 | Makemo
06 October 2016 | Tahanea
25 September 2016 | Rotoava, Fakarava
25 September 2016 | Rotoava, Fakarava
05 September 2016 | Fakarava
05 September 2016 | Fakarava
01 September 2016 | Fakarava, North Pass.
30 August 2016 | Fakarava, south pass
22 August 2016 | Tahiti
23 October 2015 | Port Denarau
05 October 2015 | Fakarava, south pass
05 October 2015 | Vurolevu Island
26 September 2015 | Matasawalevu Bay
24 September 2015 | Vunisea, Kadavu
06 September 2015 | Fulaga, Fiji
06 September 2015 | Fulaga, Fiji
06 September 2015 | Fulaga, Fiji
04 September 2015 | Susui Island

Taiohai and Hakaui

18 October 2016 | Nuku Hiva
C. Farias
We had a very short stay in Fatu Hiva but it was delightful. I never dreamed that I would come back there. It is the most dramatic and isolated of the Marquesas Islands and one can only get there by boat. The voyage is not an easy one. But it is worth every bump, kabooom and discomfort. We had a great meal cooked by a couple on the village for us. Poisson cru, mouton au lait de coco, rice, grilled chicken and fried bananas. They also gave us a stalk of bananas and a few pumplemousse but Felipe had to climb the tree to get it. We sailed to Nuku Hiva with a stop to sleep on the Island of Tahuata. Another amazing place but we didn't have time to explore. Early morning we lifteded anchor and motored for the first 2 hours as we were on the lee of the ilsand. The forecast was for 5 to 8 knots of wind from the North, not good for us. The forecast was so wrong, to our advantage, and we had winds from 15 to 19 knots, from the NE and Mauliola just glided in pretty flat seas, It was a delightful sailing day and by 2PM we were safely anchored in Nuku Hiva. On Saturday we went very early to the farmers market to get fresh provisions. The abundance of fruit and fish is such a contrast with the low atolls of the Tuamotus. Here we buy everything locally grown in the rich soils of the Island. The Marquesans are very friendly and gentil. We feel welcomed and cared for. We came back to the boat with a load of papayas, bananas, limes, pumplemousse, fish, and vegetables. After the market we rented a car and drove to the village of Hatiheu to visit the Marae and to have lunch at Ivone's. She is a lovely lady whose great great grandmother was a queen of Nuku Hiva. ivone has a small museum where artifacts of the old times are kept in display. I have been there before but I enjoyed even more the second visit. Is was very specail to see Ivone again, with the same welcoming and motherly smile and hug. Hatiheu is looking even better now. Actually everything in Nuku Hiva looks better and cleaner. This afternoon we motored 6 miles to another majestic valley, Hakaui. Tomorrow we will hike to the waterfall and will see if the couple we met when we were here 4 years ago are still around. I hope I can post this via radio as there is no internet here in the valley. Aloha to all.

Anchorage of sculptures

11 October 2016 | Fatu Hiva, Marquesas
C. Farias
We arrived this afternoon at Fatu Hiva after sailing in rough seas for 490 miles. It was a hard trip, into the wind, and the boom caboom was awful. But here we are, anchored in the same bay as we did 4 years ago when we sailed from the Galapagos. It is indeed the most magnificent anchorage. We tied up the boat a bit and went ashore to stretch our legs. We walked a bit and talked to a few of the local people, all so friendly and interested to know where you sail from. Many of the villagers were under a palm covered lanai for a church prayer and the music they played was sweet and peaceful. We met one of the local artisans who took us to his house to show his wood work. We purchased some bananas and pumplemousse from him and promised to go tomorrow to buy some of his work. He asked us if we want a meal made for us tomorrow. I said yes but the crew is a bit concerned with the hygiene in the property. The village looks the same as it did a few years ago. The few changes are more cars, which I don't know why they would have cars when there is only 1 or 2 miles of road. Back to the boat to cook some dinner and sleep. We are tired. Happy to be here and wishing we could stay longer. We need to get to Nuku Hiva by Friday as our friend Gerry Mosel, who came to sail with us, needs to fly back to Hawaii. Aloha to all and until next post.

Makemo - Sacared by sharks

08 October 2016 | Makemo
C. Farias
Our sail from Tahanea to Makemo atoll was short, just 7 hours which I am glad. The weather forecast turned out to be not what we expected and the passage was rough. Into the wind is always hard and this one was just so. We left early AM, too early for any civilized person, but Captains orders are orders. We put our fishing lines out and soon enough had 2 strikes, one of which took our lure. We put a new lure out and soon enough had a mahi mahi on the line. Unfortunately we lots it as the hydrogenerator was up and in the way for Gerry to handle the fish. After that we had no more luck. We entered Makemo via the west pass, and got in at slack tide. Soon into the pass we had to meander between many coral heads, a few were marked but most were not. We had to keep a good lookout. We were very tired although we sailed just a short time. The pounding of sailing into the wind with the seas coming from every point of the compass really took a toll on us. The anchorage is good and we are the only boat here. There are no houses, except for a copra shed, and we have the area all for ourselves. We all went to bed early to rest for the next leg of the trip. Today we went snorkeling in the other side of the pass. As soon as we got there, a few black tip sharks came to greet us. We soon were in the water surrounded by the black tips and one white tip shark. There were tons of parrot fish, some sort of jack, and lots of colorful tropical fish. The sharks stayed swimming around us and getting closer and closer. I swam many times with hundred of sharks but I was very uncomfortable. This is a remote area of the atoll, visited by very few cruisers and probably no one else. I kept looking back and to the sides all the time. After a while we moved to deeper waters and then all the excitement really started. A bunch of grey sharks came up from below us and towards us, We were surrounded by the greys, black and white tip sharks and they were too close for comfort. As Felipe said, in Fakarava we dove to see the sharks, here the sharks come to see us. Felipe started swimming back to the dinghie after he saw me shrinking into a fetal position. I wanted to have my fins sticking out not my hands or any other part of my body. We jumped into the dinghy pretty fast and did not think of going back. We have been keeping an eye on the weather today, hoping and praying for less wind as we have another leg of sailing into the wind and the sea conditions get rougher with more wind. We hope the forecast holds as our plan is to leave tomorrow (the 8th) to the Marquesas. We are not sure where the landfall will be, it depends of sea conditions, but it could be Fatu Hiva or Tahuata, which are our first choices. I have a few meals cooked already and we are all ready to go, except for rest. We need some zzzzs. I will post from the Marquesas. Aloha to all.

Waters of life

06 October 2016 | Tahanea
C. Farias
We finally had to say au revoir to Fakarava and in a sunny day, with light winds we sailed to Tahanea. Our friend Gerry Mosel came from Hawaii to sail with us. We spent our last days in Fakarava anchored in front of Pakokota, a small pension owned by a super helpful and delightful couple, Mathiew, Agnes and their beautiful 7 months old daughter. We had dinner ashore with them one night, and next day Agnes took me by car (yes, there are cars in Fakarava) to Rotoava, the village in the north pass. I needed to get fruit and veggies, and most important, ice cream. Agnes drove while I held the baby who promptly fell asleep. Pakokota is a lovely place to be. The water is clear, the bottom is sandy and it is reasonably protected from the strong winds. It is a lovely place to come back to and I was so sad to leave. However, we are in another spectacular atoll, anchored in waters that are crystal clear, with white sand bottom teaming with fish and there is only one other boat in the anchorage. The atoll in uninhabited, there was a village here once, and it is a national park. We left Fakarava in the late afternoon, and sailed overnight, a distance of 80 miles only. I took the first watch, uneventful, light winds (from 12 to 16knts) unfortunately coming from the direction that we wanted to go, and we had to tack at the end of my watch. In the middle of the night, Jerry hove to in order to slow down our progress as we couldn't come into the pass until daylight. That is a very important rule that we follow, always arrive in a pass in daylight and come into the pass at the lack tide. Ooops, we miss the tide in this one. There is no tide table for Tahanea and we tried to estimate using the Fakarava table but we were off in our calculations. The tide was already going out and there was a 3 to 4knt current already running. Today we took the dinghie and went for a snorkle in the west pass. We intended to do a drift snorkle but the tide was still slack when we got there. However, the snorkeling was gorgeous. We were right on the drop off and there was a lot of fish, big and small, a few sharks on the bottom, and a manta ray, graciously swimming below us. The waters here are even more beautiful than Fakarava. One can spend weeks here, exploring the inumerous motus (islets) and soaking in the turquoise healing waters. It clears your body and your soul of all the crap we carry with us. Unfortunately we need to keep going towards Nuku Hiva in the Marquesas and we need to take advantage of the weather window that we have now. Tomorrow morning early we sail to Makemo, another atoll just 45 miles from here. We will overnight there and in the following day we say au revoir to the Tuamotus and sail to Nuku Hiva, which is about 480 miles from here. I will update when we get to the Marquesas, or in Makemo if we get internet connection. Aloha to all.

Maintenance in Paradise

25 September 2016 | Rotoava, Fakarava
C. Farias/overcast/beautiful
We are back to the village of Rotoava where we have internet. We anchored in the same spot as last time as we knew that we could get a signal from the village. The bloody wind finally lost steam, after 3 weeks of blowing hard, and we could finally have 2 days of calm, flat water to get the jib sail down to do some repairs. Felipe did a super job of fixing it and by the end of the day we had the sail up. But when the sail was up we noticed a fraying in the bottom part of the sail and had to bring it down again. Due to the time, we decided to finish the work next day. Luck was on our side, and the wind was actually lighter than the prior day and it was easy to hoist the jib up again. Today the wind is back but much less, about 17 knots. It is nice to keep things cool.
I don't know who coined the phrase that states that cruising is doing maintenance in exotic places. it is so so true. There is always something to be repaired, checked, cleaned, polished, adjusted, oiled, charged, tightened, logged, and planned. We are so glad to have Felipe to help. It is amazing to see how much he has learned in such a short time.
A few days ago we left the spectacular turquoise lagoon where we tried to hide from the wind and motored to Hirifa, just 7 miles away, looking for protection from the wind. We motored through uncharted waters, except for a few markers on the bigger reefs, and had to keep our eyes on the water at all times to spot the "boat eating reefs" that lurk everywhere. I was very nervous and what a relief when we got to Hirifa without a scratch. And as a reward the bottom was sandy, soft white sand, lovely sand. I could have kissed that sand. One of the most harried thing in these atoll is to anchor. The bottom is rocky and almost always your anchor gets snagged, wrapped around the rocks which makes the retrieval of your anchor a job you hate to do. Sometimes we have to dive to help with the process. We only saw two houses on the shore. One of them had 2 very large pigs, a dog, a cat, and a little cafe on the shore, Hirifa snack. We didn't see a soul there and my craving for a cold ginger ale couldn't be fulfilled. But the anchorage was quiet, more protected and sandy. Yeeeey.
Next day, we moved on 17 miles north to anchor by a small pension named Pakokota. We were told that we could get good protection to get our sail down and that there was internet. Neither one was quite good enough. So, next day, again we lifted anchor. And the bottom was sandy!!!! Sweet.
We had a lovely motor sail to Rotoava, via the near shore channel, which is well marked. I was surprised to see al the new homes, some very chic, and new small hotels, and small vacation rental places along the shore. The sleepy, out of way Fakarava is no more.
Now I understand why the provisions in the stores is so much better than when we came in 2012. We found a variet of fresh fruit and vegetables that it was not available then (we could only buy cabbage, onions, carrots and pumplemousse). Having said that, the supply shop didn't come this week and the store shelves are empty of fresh stuff. They even ran out of ice cream. So did we. My Aloha to you all and until next post.

Maintenance in Paradise

25 September 2016 | Rotoava, Fakarava
C. Farias/overcast/beautiful
We are back to the village of Rotoava where we have internet. We anchored in the same spot as last time as we knew that we could get a signal from the village. The bloody wind finally lost steam, after 3 weeks of blowing hard, and we could finally have 2 days of calm, flat water to get the jib sail down to do some repairs. Felipe did a super job of fixing it and by the end of the day we had the sail up. But when the sail was up we noticed a fraying in the bottom part of the sail and had to bring it down again. Due to the time, we decided to finish the work next day. Luck was on our side, and the wind was actually lighter than the prior day and it was easy to hoist the jib up again. Today the wind is back but much less, about 17 knots. It is nice to keep things cool.
I don't know who coined the phrase that states that cruising is doing maintenance in exotic places. it is so so true. There is always something to be repaired, checked, cleaned, polished, adjusted, oiled, charged, tightened, logged, and planned. We are so glad to have Felipe to help. It is amazing to see how much he has learned in such a short time.
A few days ago we left the spectacular turquoise lagoon where we tried to hide from the wind and motored to Hirifa, just 7 miles away, looking for protection from the wind. We motored through uncharted waters, except for a few markers on the bigger reefs, and had to keep our eyes on the water at all times to spot the "boat eating reefs" that lurk everywhere. I was very nervous and what a relief when we got to Hirifa without a scratch. And as a reward the bottom was sandy, soft white sand, lovely sand. I could have kissed that sand. One of the most harried thing in these atoll is to anchor. The bottom is rocky and almost always your anchor gets snagged, wrapped around the rocks which makes the retrieval of your anchor a job you hate to do. Sometimes we have to dive to help with the process. We only saw two houses on the shore. One of them had 2 very large pigs, a dog, a cat, and a little cafe on the shore, Hirifa snack. We didn't see a soul there and my craving for a cold ginger ale couldn't be fulfilled. But the anchorage was quiet, more protected and sandy. Yeeeey.
Next day, we moved on 17 miles north to anchor by a small pension named Pakokota. We were told that we could get good protection to get our sail down and that there was internet. Neither one was quite good enough. So, next day, again we lifted anchor. And the bottom was sandy!!!! Sweet.
We had a lovely motor sail to Rotoava, via the near shore channel, which is well marked. I was surprised to see al the new homes, some very chic, and new small hotels, and small vacation rental places along the shore. The sleepy, out of way Fakarava is no more.
Now I understand why the provisions in the stores is so much better than when we came in 2012. We found a variet of fresh fruit and vegetables that it was not available then (we could only buy cabbage, onions, carrots and pumplemousse). Having said that, the supply shop didn't come this week and the store shelves are empty of fresh stuff. They even ran out of ice cream. So did we. My Aloha to you all and until next post.

Jerry's Birthday

05 September 2016 | Fakarava
C. Farias/overcast/hot/breezy
Today is Jerry's Birthday. Last year we were in Susui Island, Fiji, a most delightful place where we were treated as guest of honors. This time, we are in another magic place, so different but equally beautiful. Yesterday I baked an apple cake, apples from New Zealand that we purchased in Tahiti, for the birthday breakfast. Of course it was partially eaten last night while it was still warm, with ice cream we bought at the village. The ice cream here comes in various flavors but as Felipe says they all taste the same. Just the color changes. Nevertheless it was a treat. I also made a chocolate mousse using some of the "black gold" that my friend Anna gave ime. The day prior to our leaving Hawaii she gave me a bag full of dark chocolate which I have been generous enough to share. I actually have a new definition for trust, as I left a bar on the counter one night. Leaving the dark stuff out when Felipe and Jerry are around is really more than a leap of trust.
A trip to the village Saturday morning was the most rewarding. The Catholic Church was open. I have been to Fakarava twice and never saw it open. It is beautiful inside. Strands of shell leis hanging from the ceiling and hand painted panels depicting religious scenes and saints adorn the walls. The chandeliers are made of shell work. I was going to mess on Sunday but got busy with work and missed it.
The wind had been blowing way harder than I like, 18 to 25 knots day and night. The anchorage is a bit bouncy but not bad. We are really enjoying our stay here at the village Every trip to the village is rewarded by the smiles and greetings of Ia Orana or bonjour from the lovely Polynesian people. I have tried without success to post a photo but no matter how small I make it, it doesn't download.
Today I am afflicted with the Polynesia paralysis. It is a condition that makes anything but a shady spot, preferably with a couch or bed on it, attractive. I already have scouted the place and I will head that way soon. Jerry thanks all for the birthday wishes. My Aloha to all and until next time.

Jerry's Birthday

05 September 2016 | Fakarava
C. Farias/overcast/hot/breezy
Today is Jerry's Birthday. Last year we were in Susui Island, Fiji, a most delightful place where we were treated as guest of honors. This time, we are in another magic place, so different but equally beautiful. Yesterday I baked an apple cake, apples from New Zealand that we purchased in Tahiti, for the birthday breakfast. Of course it was partially eaten last night while it was still warm, with ice cream we bought at the village. The ice cream here comes in various flavors but as Felipe says they all taste the same. Just the color changes. Nevertheless it was a treat. I also made a chocolate mousse using some of the "black gold" that my friend Anna gave ime. The day prior to our leaving Hawaii she gave me a bag full of dark chocolate which I have been generous enough to share. I actually have a new definition for trust, as I left a bar on the counter one night. Leaving the dark stuff out when Felipe and Jerry are around is really more than a leap of trust.
A trip to the village Saturday morning was the most rewarding. The Catholic Church was open. I have been to Fakarava twice and never saw it open. It is beautiful inside. Strands of shell leis hanging from the ceiling and hand painted panels depicting religious scenes and saints adorn the walls. The chandeliers are made of shell work. I was going to mess on Sunday but got busy with work and missed it.
The wind had been blowing way harder than I like, 18 to 25 knots day and night. The anchorage is a bit bouncy but not bad. We are really enjoying our stay here at the village Every trip to the village is rewarded by the smiles and greetings of Ia Orana or bonjour from the lovely Polynesian people. I have tried without success to post a photo but no matter how small I make it, it doesn't download.
Today I am afflicted with the Polynesia paralysis. It is a condition that makes anything but a shady spot, preferably with a couch or bed on it, attractive. I already have scouted the place and I will head that way soon. Jerry thanks all for the birthday wishes. My Aloha to all and until next time.
Vessel Name: Mauliola
Vessel Make/Model: Morrelli&Melvin Custom 65' Catamaran
Hailing Port: Hawaii
Crew: Jerry King and Conceicao Farias, owners
About: Conceicao is a Brazilian, Hawaiian by heart, wahine (girl). Conceicao e uma Brasileira, Cearence, Hawaiana de coracao. Jerry is from California, an old Hobie cat sailor, the man with a vision and a mission.
Extra: Our plans: to do a sailabout and come out in the other side of the seas. The South Pacific is our first stop.
Mauliola's Photos - Main
Fiji 2015
7 Photos
Created 16 August 2015
32 Photos
Created 12 June 2015
8 Photos
Created 8 July 2012
3 Photos
Created 24 April 2012