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NY48 CHINOOK
Getting up close and personal with a 96 year old. (now 97!)
 
 
Days 23 24 25
Jonathan Greenwood
10/02/2012, Tunisia

I'm alive and well but my van is in prison in Tunis! Yes, I knew there would be a piece of paper missing, unfortunately I don't know which one it is and neither do they! I had an uneventful trip across and then spent 4 hours with the customs and even got to chat with the Commandant, but to no avail. The van had to stay.
So today the secretary, Jamila, spent her time on the phone with the agent and making endless photocopies of endless documents. Tomorrow I hope to have the mysterious piece of paper that will liberate my raison d'etre.
During my travels the team were hard at work and have made good progress as you can see from the photos. The transom fell off, sorry, was removed today revealing a large amount of spongy wood all attached together with some remnants from a previous century known then as bolts. The buttock tuck has now developed into a transplant!
Not knowing what to do with myself while stressing about the van, I began the task of sorting the bronze hardware into piles of keeping and not keeping. There is a surprising amount of original stuff that we can re use which makes me happy. I really don't want to have a new boat at the end of this project and it is important to me to keep the soul of the boat intact. One of the things that has always intrigued me about antiques is their ability to transport one back to the past and this is not only by their design but by the marks they acquired over a long period of time. Chinook will have alot of new in her at the end, but there will also be alot of old.

Jono

Restoration
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Day 22
07/02/2012, France

Well, I'm off tomorrow to Genoa to pick up the ferry for Tunis. With a bit of luck, I should be tucking into a dirty big plate of Couscous on Thursday night.
As you can see, work continues to progress and once I am on site, I hope to have some interesting stuff to post.
The literary juices don't seem to be flowing tonight so I'll leave you with the thought that this time tomorrow night I will be on an Italian ferry and 24 hrs later will be trying to extract myself from the clutches of the Tunisian customs!

Wish me luck.

Jono

Restoration
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FYI
Jonathan Greenwood
06/02/2012

The New York 40 cost the grand total of $10,000 in 1916 and you also had the option of wheel steering for an extra $280. There was also the choice of two different interior layouts but I don't think there were extra charges for that.

History
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Days 20 and 21
Jonathan Greenwood
06/02/2012, France

Week 4 finished well with the boys starting to produce sawdust, in ever increasing quantities, making scaffold trestles and stiffeners for the boat. Some quantity surveying has gone on and work has continued on the plans. I will be contacting Kurt at the MIT for some precisions and to order some more.
Cap'n Nat was very thorough in his preparations for a new build and we are lucky to have excellent custodians of this invaluable design material.
Week 5 has begun with the production of more sawdust and Salvatore, the yard owner and shipwright par excellence, has informed me that the aft port corner of the boat is 8 cms (3 inches) lower than it should be. Oh dear, it seems the old girl needs a buttock tuck !
Here in France, I have almost finished preparations for my departure on Wednesday by Ferry from Genoa to Tunis. I'm a bit worried about Italian captains and Tunisian customs but I suppose I shall muddle through. I will post my adventures on Thursday.

Jono

Restoration
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07/02/2012 | Craig
Hi Jono,
just check there are no Czech dancing girls on board and you should be safe!
I am glad to see that the sawdust is being produced by humans rather than little bugs!
Correction to my previous post.
Anonymous
06/02/2012

Below is a correction to my previous post by someone well informed. The timeline is quite amazing. Thanks.

Pauline Class number: 10 Sail number: 8
Completed rowboat: 1916-02-09 Wed
Setup: 1916-03-18 Sat
Turned over: 1916-03-29 Wed
Launched from shop: 1916-04-21 Fri
First trial: 1916-04-25 Tue (2nd NY40 trialled)
Second trial: 1916-04-26 Wed
Sailed off: 1916-04-29 Sat.

History
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06/02/2012 | william Fisher
Do you have any idea what the original cost was?
The first owner
Jonathan Greenwood
04/02/2012, France

Oliver Gould Jennings, 1865-1936, was amongst 12 prominent New York Yacht Club members to order one of the new 40 footers from the Herreshoff Manufacturing company in the Autumn of 1915. He was assigned the Hull number 782 and the sail number 8, (the 4 being added later to denote the 40 foot class) and if we can believe the New York Times article previously posted, she was the second vessel launched, which makes her the oldest surviving member of the series but not by much. All 12 boats were all built and launched before the end of April 1916 as they all took part in their first race on the 30th May off Glen Cove.
Jennings was an important member in US politics and industry and served in the Connecticut House of Representatives and was on the boards of Bethlehem Steel and The US Industrial Alcohol Company among others.
The Oliver Gould Jennings House is located on 7 East 72nd Street in the Upper East Side of New York City. I venture a guess that his yacht was named after his wife, Pauline, or perhaps he had a daughter. His wife passed away in 1964, the year of my birth.

The lovely photo is of Jennings and wife in 1914.

Jono

History
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05/02/2012 | Tim Greenwood
That sound like they built all 12 of them in about 6 months. Wow! Get your skates on Jono!
05/02/2012 |
Pauline
Class number: 10
Sail number: 8
Completed rowboat: 1916-02-09 Wed
Setup: 1916-03-18 Sat
Turned over: 1916-03-29 Wed
Launched from shop: 1916-04-21 Fri
First trial: 1916-04-25 Tue (2nd NY40 trialled)
Second trial: 1916-04-26 Wed
Sailed off: 1916-04-29 Sat.
Days 18 and 19
Jonathan Greenwood
02/02/2012, France

We had a very good meeting yesterday and made some positive decisions, paving the way forward for the smooth functioning of the restoration. Today we were at another meeting, this time with the port authorities in Cannes. They are totally remodelling the quay where we berth and we had a few questions concerning the future of winter berthing in Cannes. Again a positive reaction to our questions and concerns. I guess we will see when they finish the work whether the facilities will be conducive to keeping Cannes as our home port. I hope so.
At the yard things continue to advance, perhaps with less visual impact than the previous weeks, but I can assure you that progress is being made. The deck beams are coming off and being replaced with temporary beams lower down to hold the shape she has now. Templates of the frames are being digitally cut using the original drawings so as we rebuild, we can tweak the structure back to where it should be and hopefully when finished we should have a straight and true hull. Scaffolding is also being erected in the old fashioned way (wood delivered by pony and cart of course!) using timber instead of metal.

Jono

Restoration
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02/02/2012 | Tim Greenwood
Jono, in the interests of authenticity, can you please make sure that pony delivering the timber is using an early 20th century bridle and cart!
Day 17
Jonathan Greenwood
31/01/2012, France

The hull is now stripped of paint and the scaffold planks have arrived. Work continues to advance well at the yard.
Meanwhile here in France it has been snowing all day, so a good opportunity to catch up on some computer time, with plans, emails et al. I was in the process of preparing my mobile workshop for it's voyage to Tunisia next week but that got put on hold due to inhuman weather conditions (I can almost hear Jacko laughing!). Sandra is working on the running rigging plan and I have almost finished the plan of the spars so things are getting done. Meeting tomorrow with the Boss to discuss the way forward.

Jono

Restoration
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31/01/2012 | Tim Greenwood
Keep up the journalism Jono. Enjoying my daily restoration digest immensly.
01/02/2012 | Paul Ó Riain
me too
Day 16
Jonathan Greenwood
30/01/2012, France

Well, the whole deck has been removed and the covering boards came off today, revealing a large amount of rot, especially in the transom area. I'm sure that I've said it before but there is not much holding it all together and we joke that she held together out of pure habit! The boys are continuing to strip off the paint from the topsides and a couple more lower planks were removed during the day.

Meanwhile, back in France, I have been working on the rig plans which are difficult to read. All the spars, of which there are 6, are on the same drawing. So for the sake of clarity, I am working on having seperate drawings for each and on top of that, converting all the measurements to metric as few people here are used to working in feet and inches. A tedious job at best! I am also sourcing bronze items in the US which will be custom made to the original plans.

More tomorrow.

Jono

Restoration
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05/02/2012 |
May I suggest you don't simply convert measures to metric, but retain the imperial ones and put the metrics in brackets? That way you can always go back and check how big something was _intended to be originally_. If you only have the metric numbers it will be more cumbersome. Many CAD programs allow you to do that automatically in their dimensioning.
06/02/2012 | Jonathan Greenwood
Firstly, Welcome aboard. Converting to metric is, quite simply a necessity for us as the shipwrights have no experience whatsoever in working with feet and inches. To keep the two on the same plan would only be confusing. As project manager, part of my job will be to police the construction using the original drawings and measurements and, concerning accuracy, 1/32" being 0.8mm and taking into account the width of a pencil lead we should be as close as they were back in 1916.
Timber spars for sale
Jono
30/01/2012, Tunisia

We have a number of wooden spars in spruce and Oregon pine, including 2 masts, booms etc which are all in excellent condition. For more info, send email to link upper right.

Items for sale
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30/01/2012 | William W-F
I've been following this for the last 10 days and it is fascinating. What an amazing project keep up the blogs much more interesting than the boring papers on my desk in a cold and grey London.

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Chinook NY48
Who: Graham Walker, Jono Greenwood, Sandra Ugolini, Andrew Bates, Manu Fontaine, Phil Crebbin
Port: London
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