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NY48 CHINOOK
Getting up close and personal with a 96 year old. (now 97!)
 
 
Day 36
Jonathan Greenwood
27/02/2012, Tunisia

The goal for today was to remove the horn timber (central timber from transom to keel) which is in one place broken, and in various others, rotten. With the after sections well supported, we set to, removing the bolts that pass through each floor, and unscrewing the remaining planking in way of the horn timber. Once liberated, it was duly sectioned just aft of the deadwood and was then coaxed gently, with a 5 ton jack and then my van's scissor jack, towards its' exit "out the back door"! It did put up a fight but Allah was on our side and it succumbed without too much trouble. To follow, we will remove a small section of the deadwood to allow us to scarf in the new piece about a half metre further forward and the scarf will be nicely supported by the deadwood piece once refitted. Sounds like a plan to me!
While keeping a beady eye on the work in progress, I continued with my daily routine of transferring dirt, grime and all manner of dust, from the boats steering system to as much of my clothing as possible. Works quite well really, as my overalls look about a hundred years old and the gear looks brand new!
Throw in a bit of office work, a couple of "Insh'Allahs" and half a dozen cups of coffee and you have a full and satisfying day.

Jono

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Day 35
Jonathan Greenwood
25/02/2012, Tunisia

One has to admire the quality of workmanship from these bygone days where craftsman were allowed the noble materials and the time to imagine and construct items that would endure the ravages of centuries of hard work and the elements. Each time I look at the boat, I can't help regretting this fast and furious age of disposable goods and plastic, the only lasting thing being the plastic which we will leave behind us for future generations to deal with. We, perhaps, can't stop progress and mass production but we can still learn from the past and strive towards a better understanding of where we are going.
I should probably start a tree hugging category!

Seven weeks have past and we are on target though it is still early days. We have taken stock now, of the work, and will not find any more surprises, the elderly lady having been indelicatly stripped of her habillage! I am looking forward to next week where we will begin to repair the first parts of her tired hull and I will, of course continue to keep you updated of progress.

Bon weekend.

Jono

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Day 34
Jonathan Greenwood
23/02/2012, Tunisia

Today is a special day as it is the 83rd birthday of my dad, Michael, and I know he follows the blog every day. Happy birthday Dad. I also know that he would love to be here in the thick of it doing what we Greenwoods do best, that is getting very dirty!
And dirty I got. I finished cleaning up the through hulls and started dismantling the steering pedestal to find out what machining will be required to sort out the play issues. The bevel gearing is still in good condition and the shafts only need a couple of bushings to put them right. I would like to introduce some shaft bearings but am not sure there is room for them. At the moment it is bronze on bronze.
The work on the hull is moving rapidly forward and the frame templates should be finished tomorrow. I estimate that by the end of tomorrow we will have put some 2,500 hrs into the project in 35 days work. I think that is about a tenth of what is required. Quite a feat!

Jono.

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24/02/2012 | Craig McGowan
I often where civilisation would be if WD40 had not been invented. Glad to see you have all the up to date tools and equipment there. Where's the hammer!
Craig
Day 33
Jonathan Greenwood
22/02/2012, Tunisia

Today was an office day for me. I have much work to do putting real life prices on all the estimations that are in the budget, and so far so good. I had a great email from Jim Reineck of JM Reineck and Son in the US, who did all the bronze castings for the Marilee project over 10 years ago, and I think that he is the one to provide all the missing parts. I also spent some time working through a few of the plans, looking for good ways to incorporate the modern equipment we will have on board into the hull without upsetting the period feel that I am aiming for. I have had a couple of good ideas today and a small yip even managed to escape me at one point. I will share that with you when I'm sure it will work!
Meanwhile plenty of noise was emanating from the workshop floor, signs that the ten chippies were hard at it. The timber has been ordered and should be with us soon. We have a small stock of white oak to keep us going until then.

More tomorrow.

Jono

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Days 31 and 32
Jonathan Greenwood
21/02/2012, Tunisia

Week 7 is well under way with some new things happening. I have started cleaning the lovely old Willcox & Crittenden through-hulls to check their condition and most are still in great condition. They will certainly find their place aboard. The cleats polish up beautifully and I think that we will be able to save 90% of the bronze hardware.
On the shop floor preparations are being made to start woodworking in earnest. There is a capacity to quickly build what is needed, be it scaffolding, ladders or benches, that amazes me as nowadays we are so used to just going out and buying what we needed. The templates for the frames are well advanced and I have also been working on the rudder hangings and deadwood fastenings, which are in a very sad state.

Jono

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22/02/2012 | Tim Greenwood
Great news on the van Jono. The metal fittings look like they are in first class condition although I see on that picture you have missed a bit on the lower threads and on the bit just above the base!
22/02/2012 | Jonathan Greenwood
Glad you saw that Tim, I'll sort it tomorrow.
Day 30
Jonathan Greenwood
19/02/2012, Tunisia

Day 30 will be forever imprinted in my memory. It was the day that we managed to extricate the van from the clutches of the customs and the day where I realised how ill prepared I was for the 12 hours spread over three days spent patiently shuttling between offices, standing around for hours wondering what was happening, enduring sideways looks, and digging into my wallet every five minutes. Patience is a virtue they say and I surprised myself by taking it to the extreme, my short fuse having fizzeled out when confronted with the complexity of what I was attempting to achieve!
The van duly arrived at the work shop and I felt a profound sense of relief, knowing that I can really start work now. My van is important as it contains tools, gathered over a ten year period, and which to buy here would have been an unnecessary expense. For those of you who don't know me, I am a bit of a Jack-of-all-trades and will be doing all the plumbing, mechanics etc rather than taking on sub-contractors for each speciality. 35 years of messing about in boats, not to mention a Father who took DIY to the extreme (thanks Dad), has it's benefits!
Roll on week 7!

Jono

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Days 27 28 29
Jonathan Greenwood
16/02/2012, Tunisia

Firstly, sorry for the sparse posts this week, but I have been a little busy and have been too tired and uninspired to write anything. I think my battle with the authorities has sapped my creativity!
Secondly, we are moving forward well and are nearing the end of the dismantling process which is great news as that means that we will soon start the repairs. There are one or two items still to be remove such as the chainplates and also there is a part of the ballast keel which is separate from the main keel which needs to come off to address rot issues. It will be a delicate job as it weighs around 300kgs. There is also a lot of scraping of old paint going on, both inside and out.
A couple of the guys started making frame templates today and of the five or six made so far, each one fits perfectly both sides. That is good news.
I haven't taken many photos this week, my mind being elsewhere, but I will try to make up for it tomorrow.

Jono

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Day 26
Jonathan Greenwood
14/02/2012, Tunisia

Week 6 has begun with a certain amount of frustration. My van is still stuck in customs and it is starting to annoy me as there is no valid reason why this should be so. I think the key is in the word "reason". Don't go looking for it when there isn't any to start with!
However at the yard we are still making advances, albeit as I've said before, perhaps less visually than before. The remaing structure is being stripped of paint inside and out and the last remaining items are being removed.
I have done a lot of sorting through the hardware and various equipment and am making good progress towards a complete inventory of the original items that we have here.

Jono

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Days 23 24 25
Jonathan Greenwood
10/02/2012, Tunisia

I'm alive and well but my van is in prison in Tunis! Yes, I knew there would be a piece of paper missing, unfortunately I don't know which one it is and neither do they! I had an uneventful trip across and then spent 4 hours with the customs and even got to chat with the Commandant, but to no avail. The van had to stay.
So today the secretary, Jamila, spent her time on the phone with the agent and making endless photocopies of endless documents. Tomorrow I hope to have the mysterious piece of paper that will liberate my raison d'etre.
During my travels the team were hard at work and have made good progress as you can see from the photos. The transom fell off, sorry, was removed today revealing a large amount of spongy wood all attached together with some remnants from a previous century known then as bolts. The buttock tuck has now developed into a transplant!
Not knowing what to do with myself while stressing about the van, I began the task of sorting the bronze hardware into piles of keeping and not keeping. There is a surprising amount of original stuff that we can re use which makes me happy. I really don't want to have a new boat at the end of this project and it is important to me to keep the soul of the boat intact. One of the things that has always intrigued me about antiques is their ability to transport one back to the past and this is not only by their design but by the marks they acquired over a long period of time. Chinook will have alot of new in her at the end, but there will also be alot of old.

Jono

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Day 22
07/02/2012, France

Well, I'm off tomorrow to Genoa to pick up the ferry for Tunis. With a bit of luck, I should be tucking into a dirty big plate of Couscous on Thursday night.
As you can see, work continues to progress and once I am on site, I hope to have some interesting stuff to post.
The literary juices don't seem to be flowing tonight so I'll leave you with the thought that this time tomorrow night I will be on an Italian ferry and 24 hrs later will be trying to extract myself from the clutches of the Tunisian customs!

Wish me luck.

Jono

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Chinook NY48
Who: Graham Walker, Jono Greenwood, Sandra Ugolini, Andrew Bates, Manu Fontaine, Phil Crebbin
Port: London
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