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NY48 CHINOOK
Getting up close and personal with a 96 year old. (now 97!)
 
 
Week 17 part 2
Jonathan Greenwood
05/05/2012, Tunisia

As I prepare myself and my van (empty) for the voyage back to Europe on Sunday, I have a little smile on my face, in spite of the 400 odd kilometres and 15 hours it took to get an authorisation to circulate with my FOREIGN VEHICULE! The reason for this facial contortion is the fact that the first plank had the final adjustments made to it and it will be ready to be attached definitively to its new position next week. Its opposite number is cut to shape and is awaiting some shaping before it can be fitted. The planks I am talking about are the garboards and have the most complex shape of all the planking. We also reached another milestone today. The last pair of frames was completed and there remain only 9 pairs to be fitted to the hull almost all of which are in the forward section and are short and almost straight. By the end of the month there should be some interesting pictures to post.

I am making good headway with my various departments and am confident that I can overcome the various problems encountered so far. However the keel is going to be a difficult proposition. Of the 18 or so keel bolts, very few are vertical so it will be impossible to lift the hull off the keel. I think the quickest and easiest solution, in view of the fact that they will all be renewed anyway, will be to the take the weight of the hull and cut each keel bolt where the keel connects with the keelson. The bolt halves can then be removed more easily. Drastic measures, but without such, I can't see what other options exist. More on this later.

Jono.

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Week 17
Jonathan Greenwood
01/05/2012, Tunisia

What a nice surprise to begin the cleaning of the fuel tanks and find that they are in almost as new condition. They are stamped "Allcraft Manufacturing company Inc" of Cambridge, Masachusetts and have been extremely well made. I believe they date from the early 30s although I haven't been able to find out much about Allcraft, except that they made hot water tanks back then and still do today! They have admirably endured the ravages of time and the salt water environment. The metal is Monel 400 which is an alloy of mostly Nickel and Copper with other trace elements. If you are interested, this is a bit about Monel from Wikipedia.
"Monel's corrosion resistance makes it ideal for marine applications such as piping systems, pump shafts, seawater valves, trolling wire, and strainer baskets. Some alloys are completely non-magnetic and are used for anchor cable aboard minesweepers, housings for magnetic-field measurement equipment. In recreational boating, Monel wire is used to seize shackles for anchor rodes, Monel is used for water and fuel tanks, and for under water applications. It is also used for propeller shafts and for keel bolts.
However, because of the problem of electrolytic action in salt water (also known as Galvanic corrosion), in shipbuilding monel must be carefully insulated from other metals such as steel. The New York Times of August 12, 1915 published an article about a 215 foot yacht, "the first ship that has ever been built with an entirely monel hull," that "went to pieces" in just six weeks and had to be scrapped, "on account of the disintegration of her bottom by electrical action." The yacht's steel skeleton deteriorated due to electrolytic interaction with the monel."
Even the quality of the bronze fuel taps is astounding, having taken them apart and cleaned every small part, and of a quality impossible to find today. I will be saving all these small treasures and they will find their rightful place on board Chinook.
While I potter around in my own little world of bronze bits and pieces, the rest of the workforce continue to make large amounts of noise and dust and are preparing the first new planks, which is in itself a fairly exciting new development. Every now and then I take a wander around to keep abreast of what is happening and am happy to report that we are forging ahead as planned.
More later in the week.

Jono

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Week 16 part 2
Jonathan Greenwood
27/04/2012, Tunisia

Well, we have arrived at the end of another week and things continue to move forward. The framing is now nearing the end with only 10 or 11 pairs left to fit and next week, we will continue to cut and fit the floors and perhaps even make a start on the lower planking. Fitting the floors in the mis section is a bit of a nightmare since the some of the keel bolts pass through them and not only that but they are not vertical either so no way to pre drill the floors and fit them onto the keel bolts. They've got to come out now! Easier said than done too. The nuts at the bottom are recessed into the lead which is normal but I can't get at them, which is not. There is a lead sole about 3 inches thick screwed to the bottom of the keel which covers them, so I went and bought a chain saw this evening. That should fix it! I'll let you know how it goes.
As for the rest, I have been cleaning and restoring the various bits of bronze equipment, dreaming up weird and wonderful ways to overcome a myriad of problems and finally, preparing my van for its' return to France. The customs are not very easy here so I have gutted it and my workshop is now on the concrete floor. They also built me a lovely lock box to store all the bits and pieces.

Jono

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28/04/2012 | Tim Greenwood
Jono - the link to photos for week 15 doesn't seem to work. Well done on progress. It will be exciting to see the start of reconstruction of the interior.
28/04/2012 | Jonathan Greenwood
Link fixed, I think.
29/04/2012 | Mat
Wow Jonno, you are not hanging around !
Very impressive.
See you soon, I hope......
29/04/2012 | Jonathan Greenwood
Thanks, Mat. Moving along nicely. See you next week. Cheers.
Week 16
Jonathan Greenwood
24/04/2012, Tunisia

Let's take stock of the progress to date. (remember that the NY40 has 42 pairs of frames)
The aft section of Chinook has been completely rebuilt with 10 pairs of new frames and floors and deck beams as well as the new section of horn timber. The transom structure has been renewed and straightened and is ready to receive the planking.
The central section has received all but 10 pairs of new frames out of 20, and the totality of its' deck beams. Two structural bulkheads have been fitted in way of the mast area to provide more hull integrity. The aft one is in the original position with the forward one moving forward one frame to provide a more functional galley space.
The forward section has had 2 pairs of frames fitted out of 12 and is being worked on as I write. Several of the deck beams are ready and being the smallest and simplest section to work on, it won't take long to complete.
The timber for the spars and planking is now in stock along with the teak for the deck and the mahogany for the various pieces on deck and inside.
The inventory is complete and many of the original parts have been cleaned and checked for defects. We know what is missing and now it is just a matter of completing the picture.
Not too bad for 4 months work!

Jono

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24/04/2012 | Simon
Well done Jono, that's great progress
24/04/2012 | Rob G
Hi Jono and Sandra, Tim passed on the blog address so catching up on the previous 16 weeks! Coming on nicely. FV's Margurite and Sheila prepared you well for this one!! :-) R.
28/04/2012 | Jonathan Greenwood
Thanks to you both. Good to have you on board, Rob.
16/06/2012 | david burdett
Hi Jono. keep up the great work, watching all with interest and looking forward to talking when you are next in Wicklow.
Regards Birdy
Week 15
Jonathan Greenwood
19/04/2012, Tunisia

7 tons of timber arrived from Holland yesterday in a closed 40ft container. Not being able to get at it with the little borrowed forklift, we ended up unloading it plank by bloody plank and that seriously put paid to my resolution to post some news last evening. Now that I am feeling slightly straighter, some of the teak planks over 7 metres long took 8 of us to carry them into the shed, I feel it is time to spread some news over the ether.
I had a nice break with my children over the Easter holidays and arrived back in Tunisia on Tuesday afternoon with Graham and Sandra. We spent the remaining part of the day going over the work completed to date and discussing all the myriad of things there are to discuss when you are restoring an old rotten boat. Graham was suitably impressed and decided, then and there, that he is far crazier than he thought he was! (Don't tell him, but we already knew!) We had a nice dinner, dropped him off at the airport yesterday morning and then the feckin' wood arrived!
Since I have been back I have been dealing with the Tunisian FISC and the customs. Another visit is required tomorrow to prolong my Van authorisation. I have decided that my mobile workshop and I must part company. No, I'm not going to take the wheels off the van, it's all just becoming too hard so I am taking the workshop out of it and setting up on the concrete floor and my once very pregnant panel van will return to France next month about a couple of tons lighter.
The progress on Chinook speaks for itself if you look at the photos which I will post in the morning. Frames continue to be replaced, bulkheads fitted, and floors fastened. Timber is processed, dust and noise produced and each week we can see some real progress, which is why I have decided to limit my posts to 2 or 3 a week. My work load is increasing and my body is decreasing and I seem to have less and less time for everything.
I will go into some more detail on the progress to date in the next post.

Jono.


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Day 71
Jonathan Greenwood
16/04/2012, France

Nice pic of the droopy transom!



Sorry for the lack of info recently, but not being on site has made it quite difficult to post anything of much interest. However that is about to change as we are back to Tunisia tomorrow morning and I hope to have some juicy news for you this week. Stay tuned for updates.

Jono

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19/04/2012 | William
Jono are you ok ? I am missing the updates , hope it is because you are so busy making progress !
19/04/2012 | Graham
Jono, Sandra, Great to see you both yesterday and to see for myself the terrific progress that's been made! There's a huge amount yet to be done, however, seeing the team at work, and the care being given to every detail, assures me that we WILL be racing her from the beginning of next season! Keep up the greart work! I'll visit again in a couple of months time, meanwhile
Best regards
G.
Day 68
Jonathan Greenwood
11/04/2012, France

It is becoming more and more difficult to find material to post when I am away from the project, and I apologise for this. However, the work continues behind the scenes and this week a temporary transom and bulkhead have been fitted to further consolidate the new structure. I have been assured that progress is good and that we remain on target.
I am continuing to chase up suppliers and prices etc. I am also poring over drawings and dreaming up new ways to improve the final result.
I will be returning to Tunisia with Sandra on the 17th, so until then you will have to bear with me and next week should provide some new and interesting photos and news.
Jono

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Day 62
Jonathan Greenwood
03/04/2012, Tunisia

I'm off to France in the morning, partly to spend time with family and partly to catch up with my other New Yorker "Rowdy". The racing season approaches rapidly and I must say I will miss the starting line very much as we have decided not to campaign her this year. Rowdy responds to competition like the true thoroughbred she is and I am proud to have been part of her astounding success these past few years. Alas (or yippee!), new horizons beckon and I must deal with the fact that I have much to learn. The gaff rig will be a new departure for me and I look forward with much enthusiasm to milking every last degree of height or tenth of a knot of boat-speed out of it.
While I am away, the plan is to consolidate the new parts of the structure that have been fitted so far while continuing to add to it. I will keep you posted as to its' progress and as the info becomes available. When I get back in mid-April I will be starting to bring the various thought processes to some kind of physical presence. In a nutshell, I will seriously start ordering and buying stuff! I have been taking my time over it but, now, 3 months into the project, and many hours of study, it is time to take the plunge.
On a different note, we have accumulated quite a large amount of very interesting bronze and timber items of the nautical type. I have propellers, masts, booms, backstay levers, portholes, a deck house (rabbit hutch), bottle screws, etc. etc., so if you need a new idea for a coffee table, just drop me a line and I'm sure I can supply just what you need. Seriously, if you are in the classic scene, please ask around the boats. Maybe we can find a home for some of this stuff and put a few more Dinars into Chinook. I will post a list of gear soon.
Jono

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10/04/2012 | Phil Anderson
Hello,Jono, just to let you know you have a blog follower in California. I really appreciate to photos as I follow the project! Phil
11/04/2012 | Jonathan Greenwood
Hi Phil, thanks for following and don't hesitate to comment. Cheers, Jono
Reply to Paul
Jonathan Greenwood
01/04/2012, Tunisia

Construction Plan is copyright protected and used courtesy of MIT Museum.

Paul, the gestation period for this restoration will run to term at 12 months and we are aiming to be out of nappies/diapers by the end of May 2013 since our first race will be at Les Voiles d'Antibes early in June.
We aim to have the structure finished by end of June. Next month we will begin spar construction, and also repairs to the interior bulkheads and furniture so that before decking, everything is ready to fit without holding up the work. I think that September/October will be manic months as all will start to come together rapidly and we will probably be fitting the engine, plumbing, electricity etc. I would hope to launch and step the rig in December and do a sea trial prior to delivery to France sometime mid-January. We have an average of 8 chippies on the boat, sometimes 10 on a good day. We also have the possibility of hiring more at any time should the need arise. Unemployment is high here and they are crying out for jobs.
As to the budget, it is sufficient, set in stone, non negotiable, doesn't grow on trees and private!
As for finding time for this, it's easy. This is the only country I have ever visited that didn't have an Irish Pub so I don't get out much!

Jono.


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03/04/2012 | Craig McGowan
Hi Jono,
I agree the blog is great. Without sounding too anal it is also useful from an insurance point of view as I can show underwriters the extent of the work and the level of care and expertise provided. Incidentally, my brother could probably make use of the carpenters as he is project manager for building the new J Class over the coming year!
Reply to David
Jonathan Greenwood
01/04/2012, Tunisia

David, thanks for your comments and question. Rowdy may seem to tend more to racing but this is just an illusion. She has a beautiful mahogany interior stretching from the companionway to the bow, and can accommodate 8 people in lovely period surroundings. Solid bronze pumps, brass lamps and Victorian upholstery complete the feel. You are right about the lack of a shower, but she does have a small stove which is housed under the chopping board to the right of the sink. This was necessary as space is very limited in the galley.
My plan for Chinook is to take the original layout and tweak it in order to fit everything in so that she will be just as comfortable a cruising boat as she will be fast as a racing boat. My study of the original interior leads me to think that I can achieve this without any major modifications to the layout. I intend to provide close to 500 litres of fresh water tankage, 100 litres of black water and 100 litres of grey water, hot and cold pressurised water, separate shower cubicle, spacious galley with fridge, freezer and 3 burner stove with oven, owners cabin with double berth, commode and wash basin, spacious bathroom etc etc. In other words, all that you would expect to find in an NCB! However the difficulty is in the weight distribution, but this is easier to plan for as we are starting from scratch. There will be 300 kilos of machinery under the companionway and I am hoping that clever positioning of the new equipment will allow me to offset this in some fashion. It can and will never be perfect as this boat was designed without an engine.

Jono

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02/04/2012 | David
Hi Jono, Thanks for the reply. Rowdy certainly is immaculately presented; the nav station is a work-of-art! Would you take a payment plan of nothing down and nothing to pay for a very very very long time!
This is a bit off (Chinook) topic; you mentioned a few posts ago that someone was varnishing Rowdy - what is the maintenance regime for the varnish under the Med. sun. It's great you will be able to get the modern systems to work in Chinook. The purists might moan but I think if the ownership of an classic yacht can be made - by sympathetic hands - to be enjoyed and sailed more using modern fittings - that can only be a good thing. Regards David
02/04/2012 | Jonathan Greenwood
Sorry David, paying with peanuts will generally get you monkeys! For the varnish, 15 coats minimum for a seasons protection in the Med sunshine. We work to 20+ and even then, some parts need re-coating during the season.

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Chinook NY48
Who: Graham Walker, Jono Greenwood, Sandra Ugolini, Andrew Bates, Manu Fontaine, Phil Crebbin
Port: London
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