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One World's Adventures
Hooked
05/05/2012, 18 18'N:65 18'W, Culebra

We pulled into a protected anchorage on Culebra, nestling in between the sprinkling of sailing vessels in various states of disrepair. Having found a gap in the fleet, we lowered the anchor into the dark waters, easing the boat lightly backward to set the hook. With a final firm tug, the anchor set. The next moring, after a sound sleep, we prepared to depart for the island of Vieques. My friend Jeff manned the bow, while I controlled the anchor windless from the helm. As we pulled the anchor from the depths, I could feel an odd sensation. The bow sunk slightly as the tone of the windless deepened, straining under the pressure of something below. Jeff peered over the bow to see what we had hooked. Draped over the anchor was an old chain, descending back into the darkness on both sides of the flukes. Thinking quickly, Jeff grabbed the pike pole and eased the chain off the anchor. Now, finding himself with the full weight of the chain secured to the hook at the end of the pole, there was little he could do. He was hooked. The tug of war ended quickly with a short grunt and sceam. He let go.The chain, now free from the strange forces that woke it from its sleep, was free to descend back to the bed, pulling a new prize down to the bottom with it. Together, the two will sleep peacefully until the next unsuspecting boater arrives. As for One World, we sail on, excited about the surprises that lie ahead, and below!

05/05/2012 | Cappy
You probably remember that feeling from a time in the Benjamin Islands when we hooked a huge sunken log. I remember the bow going down and seeing a huge mass below slowly ascending. Maybe next time it will be a treasure chest!
05/05/2012 | Jeff
Yah. My feet were higher than my shoulders. I can recognize a no win situation when I see one. Sorry about the gaffe, pun intended.
05/07/2012 | flora
Nice, Jeff! Thanks for an update Wes! love to you all!
05/08/2012 | flora
we would love to see more pictures! maybe mom will take a bunch!
Sailing in Circles
05/01/2012, 18 18'N:65 18'W, Culebra

"Daddy, what island is the name of that island?" "Luis Pena Island" I told her. "What?" she exclaimed. " I thought we already had been there!"

She sat still, a confused look on her face. As I thought through it, I realised we had sailed to a new place every day for the past two months, never returning to the same spot. For the past week, we had sailed in a small circle around the island of Culebra, visiting ever little nook and cranny. It has been some of the best cruising so far, relaxed, easy, and beautiful. This circle idea has some merit!

05/02/2012 | Coops
It's a great preparation for life.
Spanish Virgins
04/28/2012, 18 18'N:65 18'W, Culebra

Just off the eastern end of Puerto Rico are a group of small island know as the Spanish Virgins, sisters to the US and British Virgin Islands chains to the east. For the last few days, we have sailed from anchorage to anchorage enjoying the clear water and sand beaches. I start my day with a dive off the boat. By mid-morning we launch the kayak and paddle board. In the afternoon, with the sun high in the sky, we snorkel. As the sun sets, we relax with familiar friends in the cockpit over a glass of wine. .... A day in the life..... Wait a mintue. I knew I had forgotten something. I forgot to add fixing the the electric toilet that would not flush because the "grinding" blade was "fouled" by a foreign object. So goes my life aboard One World.

04/28/2012 | Cappy
Yup, those foreign objects will get you every time! How about brown pickles? Wow, you are on your way again - sounds fabulous!
04/28/2012 | Gigi
Yes, amid idea settings, sometimes one has to deal with the nasty! That's sailing! Better not own a boat if you're not mechanical. By far, the adventures you're having and the beauty you're seeing are worth all the effort and intellectual stimulation break downs offer you. I'm so happy for you!
04/28/2012 | Raul
Good to hear from you. In the mean time here in real life we Miss you guys a lot. Continue to have fun and lots of good experiences. Safe passage to the U.S. Virgin islands.
Shore Leave
04/22/2012, Puerto Rico

We are celebrating two months aboard One World with Shore Leave! The past week we have traveled throughout Puerto Rico, enjoying the rain forests, Old San Juan, and the Arecibo Observatory, the largest radio telescope in the world. We are driving a real car (not a golf cart) and putting on the miles. We are filling our belly's with familiar food from Chili's, McDonald's, and KFC. We plan to top it off with a cherry from a visit to Cold Stone Creamery! Of course, no shore leave would be complete without spending the night off the boat. Waterpark hotel, here we come!

04/22/2012 | john
I like your style...............................
04/22/2012 | Chuck
at this rate I expect an order from Chili John's soon. Dad
04/24/2012 | Cindy
That sounds so fun! I bet the kids are in heaven!
Good Bye New Friends
04/17/2012

We arrived in Ponce, Puerto Rico in mid-morning after a smooth passage overnight. As we approached the dock, we were greeted by a father and son aboard another catamaran. They took our lines, tied us up, and invited us over for a potluck dinner that evening. Later in the day, we joined Dave and Kimberly, as well as another couple, Rudy and Ellena, for great food and wine. Dave and Kimberly are former yacht captain and crew having sailed most parts of the world in all kinds of weather. Rudy is a retired Dutch police officer and Elena is from Serbia.
We talked all evening, sharing stories and enjoying each others company. There was a connection, a sense of similar values and culture. We were making fast friends and it felt good. The night came to a close with hugs, thanks, and anticipation of more time together tomorrow.
I knew this would not last forever. Our weather window to get to the next port was closing. It was time to move on. At 3:00AM that morning, we silently slipped away from the dock and back in to the open ocean heading east. We never had a chance to say a formal goodbye to Dave, Kimberly, Rudy, or Elena. Relationships on the ocean are made overnight and disappear in an instant.

04/19/2012 | Abbey Herman
Thinking of all of you. I can't believe you've been gone for over 2 months, not sure I can handle the many months that follow. Glad to hear that things are going well. I'd love to see some pics of the kids when you get a chance. Missing you! Safe travels:)
04/19/2012 | flora
I always love to read what is going on with you all. Just read a few entries aloud to John. What a different and amazing world you are living in - truly living in each moment, never knowing what or who the next day or destination will bring. We love you all!
Good Bye Old Friends
04/16/2012

Last week, we were blessed with the company of the Kneeland family, close friends from Wisconsin. Our final moment together was touching, the Kneeland boys running along the breakwater shouting back and forth to Max and Solomon. Tim standing at the end of the breakwater, taking photos and calling out farewells for the last time. Ahead of us lay a dark horizon of water, behind us the sun hung low in the sky over the warm Dominican coast.
Earlier in the afternoon, while preparing the boat for departure, Tim handed me a thick envelope, requesting that I open it once at sea. A few hours into the passage, with the kids comfortably inside the cabin, Kim and I cuddled together in the aft cockpit to open the surprise. Inside, we found letters from each of the Kneelands, Tim, Lori, Alexander (14), Connor (12), Quinn (12) and Kemily (7). As we read, tears came to our eyes. The letters described their experiences, the challenges, and the impact the trip has had on them.
I often forget how different our lives are now that we are at sea. Everyday brings a new challenge, a new culture, and new relationships. Yet, deep down inside me, I long for the familiar. The familiarity of a shared culture, values, and experiences. The Kneelands brought that familiarity (and much more) with them on their visit. We will miss them.

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