SV Panta Rhei Retirement Trip

Vessel Name: Panta Rhei
Vessel Make/Model: Able Apogee 50
Hailing Port: Seattle
Crew: Larry and Karen
27 June 2016 | Chignik, Alaska, USA
23 June 2016 | Larry Nelson
20 June 2016 | King Cove Alaska
14 June 2016 | Dutch Harbor
10 June 2016 | Dutch Harbor, Alaska, USA
09 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
09 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
07 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
07 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
07 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
05 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
04 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
04 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
03 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
02 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
01 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
31 May 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
30 May 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
28 May 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
28 May 2016 | On Passage from Majuro, Mashall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
Recent Blog Posts
27 June 2016 | Chignik, Alaska, USA

Chignik is beautiful

Chignik is a surprise. It is drop dead georgous. No one told us. It is a place not to be missed.

23 June 2016 | Larry Nelson

We are experiencing "Salmon Abundance"

Last night we had the second fillet of the Sockeye Salmon which we shared with our new neighbors Ginger and Peter from SV Irene. They are home ported in Seattle also. We are both at the transient dock in Sand Point in the Schumigen Islands. And we are both waiting to go north. It turns out that even [...]

20 June 2016 | King Cove Alaska

We are at the dock in King Cove Alaska

It was an all night trip with a tail wind much of the way. Not enough to make good speed, just enough to build up a swell and make the boat roll and wag its tail. But not so bad as it could be. So, who's complaining? Not me,...now that I'm here.

14 June 2016 | Dutch Harbor

We are living in an alpine meadow

Like all high altitude journeys, this appears to carry risk. I'm posting a picture here of my neighbor's boat at the dock. It's a 63 foot Oyster. Apparently it was "tucked under" the dock last winter by winds well over 100 mph. Damage was repaired, but I think the owner now has a fender fettish.

10 June 2016 | Dutch Harbor, Alaska, USA

Passage Notes 22: Panta Rhei is in Dutch

WWe did it. We arrived and are securely tied to the dock. Looking at the 30 fenders on one of the other two sailboats I'm wondering, "What goes on here?" Its a beautiful dock, plenty of room. Finding it is easy. This is the only dock for small boats. Ask the harbormaster on channel 16 when you arrive [...]

09 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska

Passage Notes 21: 122 Miles To Go

On 9 June 14:13 hrs our position is 52d07mN 167d09mW making 6.9 knots under sail. Wind 15-20 knots aparent from southwest cog 7T.

Chignik is beautiful

27 June 2016 | Chignik, Alaska, USA
Larry
Chignik is a surprise. It is drop dead georgous. No one told us. It is a place not to be missed.

Of course the morning dawned bright and sunny which helped. We came in in the middle of the night. There are snow covered peaks right above the town, close up and dramatic. And a cliff wall across the inlet. Below the snow, the hills are green. So, yes, just like all of the Alaska Pennisula. But this is better, probably because of the lighting and the closeness of the snow above the town. The mountains between Sand Point and Chignik are rugged. There are at least a few thousand that must never have been climbed. There appears to be no way to get to them. I'm talking rugged embedded in rugged.

The marina is full of fishing boats. We anchored in the bay. Turns out we anchored pretty close to a fishing boat. I sort of saw him, but he was closer than I thought last night. No worries except that he appears to have drifted right over our anchor! Now think about this: This is a huge bay and I anchored too close to the only other boat anchored out. We are not talking the San Juan Islands here. There aren't many boats. And there are just the two of us anchored out (except for across the bay).

It is calm at our anchorage, but in our path to Geographic Harbor, there are headwinds today. They aren't dangerous, but they would dramatically slow our progress. So we will spend a day finding out what else besides beauty that Chignik has to offer. I'm pretty sure it's not dancing girls. There are no trees. (On the Alaska Pennisula we were told, behind every tree there is a beautiful woman).

So where the devil is Chignik? Try 56d18mN 158d23mW. Use Google Earth.

We are experiencing "Salmon Abundance"

23 June 2016 | Larry Nelson
Last night we had the second fillet of the Sockeye Salmon which we shared with our new neighbors Ginger and Peter from SV Irene. They are home ported in Seattle also. We are both at the transient dock in Sand Point in the Schumigen Islands. And we are both waiting to go north. It turns out that even moderately strong winds are "amplified" by the local fiords. Tail winds can become huge headwinds raising steep seas that stop the boat (or nearly so). Light wind means we can move. At least that is how we read the situation.

Last night another neighbor came by. He was a fisherman and he had a King salmon to give away. Did we want it? The price they get for King salmon is much less than for Sockeye, so they choose to give the few they catch away. When I was aboard their boat I noted that they were eating beef. It did smell good!

So this morning we are eating left over Sockeye salmon (which should finish the first fish) and we have a King salmon to begin eating tonight.

It was interesting going aboard the purse seiner to get the fish. They had it in a full compartment that was a dense mixture of ice and salt water. The fish was perfectly preserved. Fishermen know how to preserve the quality of their catch. The King salmon turned out to be a red King (not a white King) so we are still swimming in perfection of fish aboard. And that is appreciated more than just by us. We have "bird friends" now. Eagles, seagulls. We set out fish parts for them when we cleaned our King salmon. They left their thank you's on our deck.

Looking at the weather, we will be here for 3 more days. It's a good thing I have internet aboard! And, big news, yesterday we found laundry facilities at a nearby motel. We slept on clean sheets and had drawers full of clean underwear to choose from in the morning. Yay!

We are at the dock in King Cove Alaska

20 June 2016 | King Cove Alaska
Larry Nelson
It was an all night trip with a tail wind much of the way. Not enough to make good speed, just enough to build up a swell and make the boat roll and wag its tail. But not so bad as it could be. So, who's complaining? Not me,...now that I'm here.

This town is small and isolated. They have a big airport but no road to it! There is 7 miles of national park that hasn't been breached with a road. Geez. Boat travel in this part of the world is frequently hazardous.

So we thought that when we arrived after standing watch all night, we would go to the local restaurant for coffee and breakfast. We thought the restaurant would be warm and in fact the social center of town. But not here. The one restaurant doesn't open until after noon. And it is a long cold walk to get there.

But the bigger problem is that the inlet where the harbor is located has a local wind that is STRONG. It was blowing 28 knots when we came to the dock. And it was across the dock, not along it. The harbormaster seems to think it will ease by morning. Cross fingers. We don't want any drama when leaving.

The big news here is that sockeye are in season. You get sockeye by net. They don't really bite what I have to offer. And Sockeye is a rich red salmon, highly prized. So we want one. The harbormaster says that a "bow picker" will come in this evening and we can get a Sockeye from him. We will try it.

We are living in an alpine meadow

14 June 2016 | Dutch Harbor
Larry Nelson
Like all high altitude journeys, this appears to carry risk. I'm posting a picture here of my neighbor's boat at the dock. It's a 63 foot Oyster. Apparently it was "tucked under" the dock last winter by winds well over 100 mph. Damage was repaired, but I think the owner now has a fender fettish.

The port-a-pottie at the head of the dock is held down with a strap with a tensioning apparatus that crushes its roof. Everything is guyed and anchored. All buildings appear to be steel. It is a well built place. And it really looks like it has to be.

I'm not sure how much longer we will be here. Repairs are nearing completion. King Cove is next. They have Sockeye salmon we are told. The salmon aren't in Dutch Harbor yet.

Passage Notes 22: Panta Rhei is in Dutch

10 June 2016 | Dutch Harbor, Alaska, USA
Larry
WWe did it. We arrived and are securely tied to the dock. Looking at the 30 fenders on one of the other two sailboats I'm wondering, "What goes on here?" Its a beautiful dock, plenty of room. Finding it is easy. This is the only dock for small boats. Ask the harbormaster on channel 16 when you arrive anytime of the day or night.

It is beautiful, georgous actually. There is snow down to the water level in places (where it avalanches and accumulates). It is cold. We had to dodge a humpback whale on the way into the harbor.

Internet appears hard to get and expensive. Bottomless coffee is available though in a heated restaurant. It needs to be heated! The mountains around the harbor are beautiful.

The buildings and roads are pretty new looking and colorful. Really good to be here.

Larry and Karen
SV Panta Rhei



--

Passage Notes 21: 122 Miles To Go

09 June 2016 | On passage from Majuro, Marshall Islands to Dutch Harbor, Alaska
Larry
On 9 June 14:13 hrs our position is 52d07mN 167d09mW making 6.9 knots under sail. Wind 15-20 knots aparent from southwest cog 7T.

It is getting rougher and I may need to reef soon but otherwise a good sail. Karen is asleep so I'd rather not have to wake her but we'll see.

102 nm distance to the initial approach fix, then about another 20 into dutch harbor. It looks like a night arrival. Ugh.

It is raining from condensation inside the boat. We have been sailing for about 9 hours now and expect to continue through tomorrow. This is helping the fuel situation.

Larry

--

Panta Rhei's Photos - Paradise Village Marina
Photo 5 of 21 | Back To Album
Prev   Next
Paul taking a swim break behind Panta Rhei in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle
Paul taking a swim break behind Panta Rhei in La Cruz de Huanacaxtle
Added 16 December 2010

About & Links