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Issuma
Rainy Day
Richard
Sat Feb 25 0:28:30 EST 2012, Sitka, Alaska, USA

Looking out the pilothouse window at a fishing boat returning to port in the rain.

Sat Feb 25 14:44:57 EST 2012 | yann
such a lovely day!! :)
you could have been in Labrador, do you remember??
friendly
yann
Sat Feb 25 15:48:56 EST 2012 | Joe Berta
Hey Richard
Yesterday we had rain in the morning, several inches of snow in the afternoon, rain again in the evening and now back to all feezing up again.
But, today the sun is shining, which makes it all better......
Sat Feb 25 20:20:33 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Ahhhh, nothing like winter weather :)

I remember fishing boats in Labrador, and that it rained often, if that is what you mean...
Sun Feb 26 7:12:05 EST 2012 | yann
I just remember how people were greeting each other in Cartwright, even when raining.
Sun Feb 26 11:45:40 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Ahhh, yes, now I remember, they always took the bright side and said 'beautiful day' no matter what the weather.
Sailing Back to Sitka
Richard
Tue Feb 21 18:07:21 EST 2012, Sitka, AK

On Saturday, the wind remained cooperative and late in the afternoon, we sailed into the harbor at Sitka.

Pleasant Sailing
Richard
Mon Feb 20 12:00:00 EST 2012, Sitka Sound, AK

On Saturday, after setting sail in a near-calm, the wind steadily increased to a pleasant sailing breeze. We dropped the fisherman and sailed along nicely under yankee jib (the forward-most sail) and mainsail (the aft-most sail) alone.

Had lots of problems tacking with the yankee jib sheets catching on the forestaysail stay. Normally I have the forestaysail (trinquette) set before the yankee jib (a much larger sail). I wasn't using the forestaysail that day (for no particular reason), so there was nothing to keep the yankee jib from wrapping around the forestaysail stay each time we tacked. So someone went forward on each tack to help the yankee jib get around the stay.

It was a nice sail anyway. For a few minutes there was some hail to remind us it was still February in Alaska, but it never rained, and the wind was good.

Tue Feb 21 16:11:17 EST 2012 | John H
I suppose the yankee jig would be less likely to foul on the forestaysail when it's up compared to the bare metal of the stay.
Maybe a dumb question but could you partially furl the yankee when you tack the unfurl it after tacking. You might still get enough turn to tack and lessen the catching on the stay.
Tue Feb 21 18:54:49 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
John, thanks, yes, the yankee jib would be less likely to foul on the forestay if it was partly (better yet, fully) furled. The downside is that it takes about a minute to furl the jib, in which time, one loses a lot of speed (due to being undercanvassed and fighting the weather helm that results from having the main up with no headsail to balance it). It would have been easier on the sail than what I was doing, though...

The best thing to do is put the forestaysail back on a furler. That way, when tacking, the yankee jib is dragged across either a furled sail, or a smooth extrusion, not a wire. Of course I need to buy a new furler to do that :).

Richard
Setting the Fisherman
Richard
Sun Feb 19 22:00:00 EST 2012, Sitka, AK

Got out for a pleasant daysail on Saturday. It seemed there would be very little wind, and we motored up towards the head of Sitka Sound before we found wind and started sailing.

The lower forward corner (tack) of the fisherman sail is just visible in the picture, pointing down. The fisherman is raised by two ropes (halyards), both of which are led to the foremast on Issuma. In the picture, Clayton and Blaine are raising the fisherman, looking aloft to ensure it is not getting tangled as it is raised.

Sun Feb 19 22:56:23 EST 2012 | Victor
Finding the wind seem to be an understatement there. Hauling Fisherman up is always a tricky job as it may tangle other sails already in place. You seem to be so consistent of taking every occasion to sail regardless. Looks "Issuma" is in good hands.
Mon Feb 20 14:01:51 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Thanks, Victor. It is always nice to get out for a sail.
Richard
Presentation Sunday in Sitka
Richard
Tue Feb 14 13:01:36 EST 2012, Sitka, AK

I'll be giving a presentation on Sailing the Northwest Passage next Sunday at 5PM at the Kettleson Memorial Library in Sitka.

Tue Feb 14 15:57:38 EST 2012 | Dave Z
Wish we could be there! If you swing by WarmSprings Bay (E side of Baranof) before May, please drop by... would love to meet you. We're at the Lodge (1st docks, N side).

Dave and Anke
Wed Feb 15 13:07:06 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Dave and Anke,

Thanks for the invitation! When some more projects are done I'll plan to come over, as I'd like to meet you also.

Richard
Thu Feb 16 4:15:13 EST 2012 | george ray
Glad your speaking tour is going well. . . . .
I seem to recall that the Dave and Anke boating story is a very interesting one. ( http://www.akzeigers.com/DaveAnke.html )
Fri Feb 17 14:52:43 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
George, thanks. Yes, Dave & Anke do have interesting boating stories on their website and blog triloboats.blogspot.com .
Richard
Baking on Issuma
Richard
Tue Feb 7 12:00:00 EST 2012, Sitka, AK

In the picture, I am mixing the meringue for a lemon-meringe pie. The lemon pie can be seen in the rectangular pan. The rectangular pan pretty much takes up the entire rack of the oven. I whittled down the end of a wooden spoon so it would fit into the chuck of the cordless drill to mix things like meringue with. The cordless-drill-with-wooden-spoon method worked better than trying to mix meringue by hand, however, when I got to Alaska, I found a hand-powered egg-beater for sale in a store, which does an even better job.

Issuma has an old Plastimo gas oven. Surprisingly, both the burner and the chimney are at the back of the oven, so most of the heat produced went straight up the chimney. This meant the back of the oven got hot and burnt stuff and the front of the oven stayed cool and didn't cook. I made a heat deflector for the oven which greatly improved things.

Offshore, I tend to bake bread most days. In warm climates, I make yeast bread, using either regular yeast or sourdough yeast. I have not had much luck with getting yeast breads to rise in cold climates, as yeast is quite picky about temperature, and I don't yet have a warm and secure place to leave the dough for several hours to rise. In cold climates, I just use baking powder or baking soda (with something acidic to act with the baking soda) for making the dough rise (resulting in much denser breads).

Tue Feb 7 12:38:41 EST 2012 | Loughlin
Long time lurker. What other odd adaptions do you make to handle the cooking.
Tue Feb 7 20:20:29 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Loughlin, welcome. Other than using an insecticide spray bottle (filled with fresh water) to get pressurized fresh water to rinse dishes with, I can't think of any other odd adaptations that I make to handle cooking...
Richard
Wed Feb 8 0:10:43 EST 2012 | Victor
I can see after all you are the chef as well contrary to one of your presentation (pop-corn). There is an instant yeast on the market not as picky as regular to proof the dough. Gerard Natanek of Nekton NWP 2006 was the master of the galley along his nephew Luc while Ania Cieslicka-Natanek was doing it full time. They got from locals at about North Cape hind piece of caribou and made a master piece out of it. They didn't have Alaska cucumbers for desert at that time.
Wed Feb 8 0:22:04 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Victor, thanks, I'll check into the instant yeast. Popcorn is my favorite boat-food, but one can't live on popcorn alone (people need pie as well :) ).
Richard
Wed Feb 8 19:23:59 EST 2012 | bowsprite
I will have to give you my scallion pancake recipe. It's just flour & water, not greasy, fast and easy. I roll in scallions (you could use onions, shallots, pickled peppers) and some tinned fish like herring. So good! Pan fries quickly in a skillet.

But, where will you roll out the dough? hmmm.
Wed Feb 8 21:58:47 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Christina, thank you, I would like your scallion pancake recipe. There is a little space to roll dough on the counter.
Richard
Tue Feb 14 16:17:33 EST 2012 | Dave Z
Two comments:

Re Heat LOST up the Chimney - You can add a damper... high on the stove-pipe lets it radiate longer into the cabin. High or low, it will 'back' heat into and around the oven.

Consider a stop screw to prevent sailing motion from closing, and a CO monitor (in case damper doesn't allow adequate draft, backing CO into cabin... will depend on the stove's design... dangerous if not compatible).

RE Bread Rising Aboard - In the old days they used hayboxes (TJones describes them in ONE HAND FOR YOURSELF, ONE FOR THE SHIP). Essentially an insulated box or bag, closely fit to a pot. You can add a concrete (or other thermal mass) that can be preheated for baking in the box

These are great for cooking directly, or holding warm (piping hot soup, mid-watch) or incubating (bread and/or sprouts in cool climes).
Wed Feb 15 4:25:59 EST 2012 | Dave Z
Whoops... shot my mouth off, RE HEAT LOST. Upon actual research, I came across PERSONS WHO CONDUCT TESTS. Under COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS, I found this:

"3. Using a damper in the chimney helps to make a stove work better.

FALSE

Again, slowing down the draft in a cooking stove is usually detrimental. Dampers should not be used in a well designed cooking stove."

Their tests show that "Hot flue gases need increased velocity to achieve good heat transfer."

Full article at http://autonopedia.org/crafts_and_technology/Woodburners/Wood_Cook_Stove_Design.html

Though about wood-fired stoves, the gas flow analyses apply to all combustion stoves.
Wed Feb 15 12:59:39 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Dave, thanks very much for your comments. I probably should have used a different word than "chimney", as the exhaust gases from the Plastimo gas oven exit the oven at the top of the unit, not via an external chimney, so it would not be possible to put a damper on this cooker.

I have "barometric" dampers on my Dickinson cabin heaters. They certainly improve the amount of heat that stays in the cabin, but have problems with waves and heeling because they operate via counterweights. I think your stop-screw suggestion might fix that.
I'll read thru the link you mentioned, it looks quite interesting.

I read of the haybox in Tristan Jones' book many years ago, and have had such a thing on my to-do-sometime list for a long time. I hadn't thought of them for sprouting or bread-rising--I was thinking more of slow-cooking/keeping warm soups and stews in the pressure cooker.

Richard
Presentation Next Week in Vancouver
Richard
Thu Feb 2 18:22:48 EST 2012, Sitka, AK

I'm giving presentations on Sailing the Northwest Passage next week at the Vancouver Boat Show (http://www.vancouverboatshow.ca).

Times:
3:00PM Thursday Feb 9,
4:30PM Saturday Feb 11,
11:30AM Sunday Feb 12


Fri Feb 3 18:45:29 EST 2012 | Blair Gillis
If I was closer I would be going to your presentation in Vancouver. I have been following your trip through the north west passage.
Sat Feb 4 21:45:23 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Blair, thank you. Sorry I'm not closer to Labrador.
Richard
Sun Feb 12 5:50:23 EST 2012 | george ray
Hope the boat show talks are going well.
Mon Feb 13 8:06:36 EST 2012 | Doug
Richard, Please relate your presentation experiences at various Boat Shows - what are people interested in learning about your NWP? Is there still a spirit of adventure and exploration out there? What preconceived ideas do people have about the Arctic and NWP? Do they know who discovered the NWP? That there are many NWP routes?
Thanks,
Doug
http://www.northwestpassage2012.com
Tue Feb 14 11:22:51 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
George, thanks.

Doug, there is definitely a spirit of adventure and exploration out there. Audiences seemed to vary from those who had sailed the NWP or were planning to do so, to those interested in hearing and seeing an adventure story. My talk was mostly about my trip, with a little background information and a map of general NWP routes. I think the audience already knew at least some of the history of the NWP. I didn't ask about what ideas people in the audience had about the Arctic or the NWP (I didn't really ask many questions of the audiences, perhaps I should have, but time was limited).

Richard
Neighbors
Richard
Tue Jan 31 13:32:26 EST 2012, Sitka, AK


Tropical Sunrise
Richard
Tue Jan 24 12:01:24 EST 2012

As it's midwinter in Alaska, I thought I'd post a tropical sunrise picture for variety. The picture was taken in the South Atlantic, near Brazil.

Tue Jan 24 22:20:37 EST 2012 | Victor
Good picture, it warms me up. NW winds, it must be above 25S while open hatch would worry me at lee side as you were sailing single hand then.
Fri Jan 27 13:36:14 EST 2012 | Richard Hudson
Victor, thanks. I wasn't concerned about the little hatch as the winds were steady and that hatch is small. I've since replaced that hatch with bolted-down plywood. When I find some thick enough plastic, I'll replace the plywood with clear plastic.
Neighbors
Richard
Sun Jan 22 10:33:07 EST 2012, Sitka, AK


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