Roaring Girl

The adventures of the yacht Roaring Girl wandering the seas.

12 August 2013 | Ipswich, England
17 July 2012
16 July 2012
10 July 2012
05 July 2012
03 July 2012
03 July 2012
03 July 2012
02 July 2012 | Shanghai (high up!)
02 July 2012 | Shanghai (high up!)
02 July 2012 | Shanghai (high up!)
02 July 2012
02 July 2012 | Shanghai
01 July 2012
01 July 2012 | Moganshan Lu, Shanghai

The other side

23 August 2009 | Porto Communale, San Remo
If you turn left, you're in our world. Here there are various finger pontoons and quays, and a lot more ordinary boats. On your immediate left, sticking out from the main breakwater are two smaller fingers. The first is only a breakwater, but also protects quite a few fishing boats. The next one is a bigger L-shaped pontoon, home to several small yachts. Beyond that is the quay, and you can see the arrow pointing to the line of boats moored bow or stern-to. (Yes it is RG on the end.)
The pontoon berths belong to the Yacht Club and are private; there seems to be no arrangement for visiting yachts to use them at all. Perhaps some serious chatting up of the YC would work, but that would require (at the least) better Italian than we are ever likely to manage.
According to Heikell, and to various other boaties we had met, this quay is free for up to three days. And, mirable dictu, this turns out to be true. Even with electricity and water. And in practice, especially with the wind so unhelpful, no-one seems to pay attention to obvious birds of passage who are wind-bound for a few days more.
What are the downsides? Well, it's not as secure and palatial as a marina. There is an ablutions block we haven't explored yet. For us, though, the biggest one was an unanticipated opportunity to test our stern anchoring arrangements. There are lines off the quay - but none were left when we arrived, although there were quite a few spaces.
For the uninitiated, in a lot of central and eastern Mediterranean ports, you moor by pointing one end of your boat at the quay, dropping an anchor some distance away and then using that anchor to hold you off the hard concrete, and your lines on to the quay to hold you straight, and enable you to get ashore. So far, we have not had to do this, always finding places where a line has been laid from the quay to a mooring out in the harbour; you haul this up on a boathook and attach it to an aft cleat, and it does the same job for you, with a lot less effort. We will always go in bows-to: with solar panel, self-steering, life-raft, dinghy and everything else, getting off our stern is a major challenge. This means we can't use our main bower anchor, which a lot of boats do, but must run one off the stern.
The time had come, rather unprepared, for us to try all this for ourselves. Pip had done it once, on her Greek day-skipper course four years ago. Sarah's never done it. The anchor was on the stern, with 10m of 10mm chain and 30m of (new) 15mm rope for precisely this moment. So, we decided to give it a go.
Well - we ended up tied on, but unable to get far enough back to keep off the quay: Sarah had dropped the anchor far too late and there wasn't enough cable in the water to hold us off. After a lot of faffing about we decided to get the anchor up and try again.
Ho hum! Could we get our 15kg Fortress anchor up? No, we couldn't. Even after we'd reversed out over it and were trying to haul it up while getting blown about in rather a confined space. In the end, we tied a fender to the end of the rope and threw the lot overboard, rather than further risk hitting other vessels. Then we reverse-parked onto the fuel dock (showing we do at least know how to drive the boat!) and collapsed to think a moment.
In all this we'd been given lots of help by the skippers of two French yachts. They'd taken our lines, come up with lots of ideas and generally talked a lot (in French). Jean then, to our amazement, calmly sculled over to our anchor and hoiked it out of the mud. Obviously we need to spend more time in the gym. He brought it over to us at the fuel dock and we stowed it again and thought some more.
Further conversation with Jean, his partner Francine and the next door skipper Andre, suggested another solution. We came in alongside Jean's boat, on the end of the row, and used his tailed line. We then tied his boat (which is 3m smaller and lot lighter than RG) to us, with elasticated lines. He can go whenever he likes, and we are all held safely off the concrete.
Hence the quest for a chandlery: today we have bought a stern roller to fit on the aft deck and take the chain, making the whole process easier to handle. It may not solve all the problems, but it's certainly a necessary step. Another one will be to mark the rope. And to get better at dropping the blasted thing much sooner.
The lovely Jean, Francine, Andre, and Josie then invited us aboard for drinks. They also have two dogs (Mingus and Chloe) who got a bonanza of treats from Pip. The two boats have sailed in company for years, and it was delightful to talk to them. They gave us lots of hints for the Italian coast to come, not least to bargain down the marina price in Genoa, and to go to St Marguerite de Ligure and visit Portofino from there.
In the meantime, the forecast remains persistently irritating. We will recover for another night or two here and then move on towards Genoa. Even no wind would be preferable to fighting this strong east-north-easterly, which slows us down and could blow up a nasty sea without much warning. But if we have to keep coastal and go against it, we will do shorter hops. A gentle exploration of the Italian Riviera isn't too hard.
Comments
Vessel Name: Roaring Girl
Vessel Make/Model: Maxi 120
Hailing Port: Ipswich
Crew: Pip Harris and Sarah Tanburn
About: Captain Sarah and Chief Engineer/Mate Pip moved on board in 2003 and finally made the break in 2006. Roaring Girl, launched in 1977, has already been round the world once, and has a lot more seamiles than the two of us put together.
Extra: These pages aim to bring you our adventures as they happen, as well as Roaring Girl's sailing prowess. And to show off Pip's silverwork as well.
Roaring Girl's Photos - Main
Pictures of the nuraghe Santu Antine at Torralba
4 Photos
Created 4 August 2010
Gullivette working the boat
5 Photos
Created 6 July 2010
The amazing site at Filitosa with statue-menhirs carved in granite
8 Photos
Created 3 July 2010
Pictures from the sanctuary on Corsica, at A Cupulatta
7 Photos
Created 3 July 2010
The tower on the headland and the rocks of Iles Sanguinaire on the northern edge of the Golfe d'Ajaccio
5 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
The walk from Girolata to the road
6 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
Pictures of the harbour and buoyage in the Port of Girolata
3 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
The rock formations on the coast of the Scandola Nature Reserve
5 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
Pictures of the anchorage and headland at Ile Rousse
6 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
Pictures of the coast walk around the Desert des Agriates
6 Photos
Created 20 June 2010
Landmarks and views from the tip of Corsica
14 Photos
Created 25 May 2010
Pictures from the hills on the north coast of Elba - see post dated 25 May 2010.
5 Photos
Created 25 May 2010
Pictures of the small marina in the town
3 Photos
Created 25 May 2010
A description of our renewable energy generators, particularly our demountable ampair 100. See detailed post of 19 May 2010.
4 Photos
Created 20 May 2010
Pictures of our pals, particularly a feast for Bichon lovers. See post of 19 May 2010
7 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 20 May 2010
Recording some of the more splendid dishes of our Itinerario Gusto, as described in the post of 19 May 2010
4 Photos
Created 20 May 2010
A large album of pictures showing some of the beauties of the island.
21 Photos
Created 20 May 2010
Pictures of the entrance to the Rade, the anchorage and the darsena. Relates to post of 19 May 2010
8 Photos
Created 20 May 2010
The old market of Rome is being abandoned to rot, while, right next door, a new one is taking shape.
4 Photos
Created 12 May 2010
Pictures from the basilica, especially the bronze doors from the ancient Senate and wonderful mosaic decorations
8 Photos
Created 12 May 2010
Pictures of passarelles (gangplanks to the lubbers!) See post of 9 May 2010
7 Photos
Created 9 May 2010
Pictures of Ostia, the seaside town of Rome. See post of 9 May 2010.
6 Photos
Created 9 May 2010
Pictures from the Capitoline Hill. See post dated 9 May 2010
6 Photos
Created 9 May 2010
The inside of the cathedral and the great piazza in front of it. See posts from 22 April 2010.
10 Photos
Created 25 April 2010
Detailed pix of the process of cleaning out the binnacle compass and filtering the oil. See post of 18 April 2010.
4 Photos
Created 23 April 2010

Who we are

Who: Pip Harris and Sarah Tanburn
Port: Ipswich