A little boat and a big ocean.

18 September 2015 | Beaulieu River, UK 50’27.32N 2’32.09W – Hayling Yacht Company, Hayling Island, UK 50 48.27’N 0’58.24W via Wicor Marine, UK
14 September 2015 | St Anne, Alderney 49’43.47N 2’11.35W – Beaulei River, UK 50’27.32N 2’32.09W via Studland Bay, UK
12 September 2015 | Gosselin, Sark 49’25.78N 2’22.70W – St Anne, Alderney 49’43.47N 2’11.35W
07 September 2015 | St Peter Port, Guernsey 49’27.32N 2’32.09W – Harve Gosselin, Sark 49’25.78N 2’22.70W
01 September 2015 | Tregarvan, Aulne River, France 48’15.16N 4’14.00W – St Peter Port, Guernsey 49’27.32N 2’32.09W via Cameret Sur Mer, France & Herm, Guernsey
23 August 2015 | Ile de Penfret, Iles de Glenan, France 47’43.05N 3’57.04W – Tregarvan, Aulne River, France 48’15.16N 4’14.00W via Anse de Kerautret, River Odet, France, Englishmans Cove, River Odet, France & Camerat sur Mer, France
19 August 2015 | Treac’h er Gourhed, Ile Houat, France 47’22.99N 2’56.85W - Ile de Penfret, Iles de Glenan, France 47’43.05N 3’57.04W via Port Kerel, Belle Ile, France & Port Tudy, Groix, France
14 August 2015 | La Rochelle, France 46’08.60N 1’10.09W – Treac’h er Gourhed, Ile Houat, France 47’22.99N 2’56.85W via Anse des Vieilles, Ile d’Yeu, France & Trebezy, St Nazaire, France
08 August 2015 | Anse l’Oubye, Ile de Re, France 46 09.2455 N 1’15.50W – La Rochelle, France 46’08.60N 1’10.09W
04 August 2015 | Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W – Anse l’Oubye, Ile de Re, France 46 09.2455 N 1’15.50W
01 August 2015 | Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W
28 July 2015 | Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W – Ribadesella, Spain 43’27.81N 5’03.71W via Laurno
24 July 2015 | Ria Vivero, Spain 43’40.55N 7‘36.16W – Luarco, Spain 43’32.87N 6’32.08W via Ribadeo, Spain
21 July 2015 | Ria de Cedeira, Spain 43’39.26N 8’03.74W – Ria Vivero, Spain 43’40.55N 7‘36.16W
16 July 2015 | Vila Franca do Campo, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’43.01N 25’25.75W – Ria de Cedeira, Spain 43’39.26N 8’03.74W, via Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores
06 July 2015 | Ponta Delgada, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’44.29N 25’39.94W – Vila Franca do Campo, Sao Miguel, Azores 37’43.01N 25’25.75W
30 June 2015 | Angra do Heroismo, Terceira, Azores 38’39.15N 27’12.97W – Ponta Delgada, Sao Migual, Azores 37’44.29N 25’39.94W
25 June 2015 | Velas, Sao Jorge, Azores 38’40.82N 28’12.16W – Angra do Heroismo, Terceira, Azores 38’39.15N 27’12.97W
19 June 2015 | Horta, Faial, Azores 38’31.99N 28’37.50W – Velas, Sao Jorge, Azores 38’40.82N 28’12.16W via Cais do Pico, Pico Azores
14 June 2015 | Horta, Faial, Azores 38’31.99N 28’37.50W - Horta, Faial, Azores 38’31.99N 28’37.50W via Mountain du Pica

The road stops at Arisaig or does it?

07 May 2012 | Arisaig, Sound of Arisaig, 56’54.44N 05’51.36W - Loch Harport, Isle of Skye via Rum, 57’18.12N, 06’21.01W
Its funny how things have changed in such a short amount of time. In times past we would have gone to a fishmongers for seafood, now we go to the shoreline; we used to just download maps of the internet to find out where to go, now we beg and borrow charts from unusual places; we used to go where we were told or needed to, now we literally go where the wind blows us; we used to turn up the heating if we were cold, now we put on more clothes and simply laugh it away. Life is good on Ruffian and we are coming to appreciate both the things we have now and the things we had then.

When we left Southampton all those weeks ago the port of Arisaig marked our most northerly goal. Once here we would simply start heading south and exploring the places we missed on our way up. We therefore wanted to make the most of our time at Arisaig; the sun was shining and the tide was out, so off we went off in Thug for a mammoth dingy safari and a shoreline scavenge around the rocks and skerries that we avoided on our way in.

The skerries off Arisaig are amazing, it feels like you are on the moon when you get off your dingy, with rocks and beaches that are only uncovered for a couple of hours a day and which have hardly felt the touch of man. Only this is a moon where there is seafood everywhere, we picked up clams, muscles, scallops and oysters at every turn. What was the food of kings was literally being handed to us on a plate. We took just what we needed and no more and headed home, once we'd managed to relocate Thug as we'd lost him in the myriad of inlets and only after the tide had started to flood.

Whilst out in the islands we spied a very brave yacht expertly navigating through the shallows and making an early entrance into the harbour. The camera clicked away as we felt this bravery deserved some recognition. When we returned just next to Ruffian, was a local boat called 'Cluaran Dubh', over we went and introduced ourselves and told our story. This was going to be another remarkable Arisaig meeting. As we outlined that this was our most northing and we had no more charts, Euan, simply offered to loan us his that he'd not be using for a couple of weeks. It is this sort of unwanting generosity that we are finding abound in Scotland and is quickly returning our faith in humanity. Many thanks Euan and Julia for your advice, trust and generosity.

Now loaded with both seafood and charts we had decisions to make, how to cook our seafood and where to go. Neither were easy decisions but both were to be excellent in the results. The seafood went into tremendous paella and the charts are enabling us to visit Rum, then maybe Skye or Canna and with a push maybe even some on the outer isles if we are brave enough and have the right weather.

Off to Rum it was then. Rum had been recommended by Both Isobel and John as a good anchorage and with an amazing house. The anchoring was indeed amazing, good holding and deserted, the house however was in the middle of a much needed refurbishment. We are sure in it's heyday, with live turtles and crocodiles in heated tanks and birds of paradise and humming birds flying around it would have been a sight to behold. It is a monument to Edwardian opulence with all the stone, workers and even the soil transported from the mainland.

Our time on Rum has had to be short as the forecast for the following day was for light rain followed by heavy rain with an easterly wind. With the new charts we had choices galore and opted to go further north seeking shelter in Skye, or more specifically a distillery with shelter in Skye.

An early start ensued and we wrapped up warm, but things are clearly warming up underwater as we were joined by a school of Dolphins jumping and playing in our bow wave, our first sighting of Common Dolphins since the Celtic Sea. Things slowly warmed up on deck as layer upon layer was peeled off as the warm sun thawed us out. We do have the luck of old Harry on Ruffian as at one point there was rain over the mainland, rain over Rum, rain over Canna and Rain over Skye whilst we basked in the sunshine on Ruffian yet again.

Euan & Julia coming into Arisaig through the rocks. Many thanks for the charts, trust and generosity.
 Euan & Julia coming into Arisaig through the rocks. Many thanks for the charts, trust and generosity .

The moonscape of the outer islands at Arisaig.
 The moonscape of the outer islands at Arisaig.

Fiona steaming the clams and muscles. Pink job.
 Fiona steaming the clams and muscles. Pink job.

Whilst Iain dispatches the scallops. Blue job.
 Whilst Iain dispatches the scallops. Blue job.

Sailing in the sun towards Rum.
 Sailing in the sun towards Rum.

Princess Fiona at the entrance to her castle. Does that make Iain shrek?
 Princess Fiona at the entrance to her castle. Does that make Iain shrek?

The height of Edwardian opulence.
 The height of Edwardian opulence.

An early start on Riffian. Beats the 5.15 to Waterloo.
 An early start on Riffian. Beats the 5.15 to Waterloo.

Happy, dry, non windy weather spotted on board Ruffian. NOT.
 Happy, dry, non windy weather spotted on board Ruffian. NOT.

Dolpins at 11 o'clock, and 10 and 9 and 4. They're everywhere.
 Dolpins at 11 o'clock, and 10 and 9 and 4. They're everywhere.

Brrrrrrrrr.
 Brrrrrrrrr.

Porridge is the answer after you've been chilled to your bones.
 Porridge is the answer after you've been chilled to your bones.

Comments
Vessel Name: Ruffian
Vessel Make/Model: Sadler 34
Hailing Port: Newcastle
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Created 29 January 2016