SV Why Knot- No plan, no schedule, no destination.

The passing of my life mate has ended the cruise of Why Knot. Thanks to those that followed her voyages. It gave us wonderful memories and a heck of a life

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
14 October 2015
16 February 2015 | Port Aransas
18 December 2014
02 December 2014 | Port Aransas, Texas
09 October 2014 | Port Aransas
28 September 2014 | City Marina, Port Aransas
04 September 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
01 September 2014
24 August 2014
13 August 2014
09 August 2014 | Clear Lake Shores, Texas
01 August 2014
13 July 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
29 June 2014 | Clear Lake/Canyon Lake
17 June 2014
15 June 2014 | Solomons, MD- same old slip- not moved
12 June 2014
28 May 2014

Home Port

19 January 2012 | Crew-Texas Why Knot-Wilmington NC
Bligh- almost perfect springlike day
HOME PORT
January 17, 2012
Most folks think a vessels’ home port is that port painted on the transom. Technically, that is not necessarily correct. The one painted on the transom is the port of registry and it may or not be the home port and it may or may not even be near the water. The port where based, is the home port. For a cruising boat, where there is no base of operations, the home port coincides with the port of registration thus, in our case, Port Aransas, otherwise known as Port A. Since it has been several months since the crew of Why Knot has been in salt air, we looked forward to our trip this last weekend to visit our home port and our friends there. Port A is vastly different than any other port we have visited thus far and even without the spectacular scenery of the Keys, the Islands of the Atlantic Coast; we know it will always be Home Port to Why Knot. Whether or not she ever clears the jetties again, that will be the case at least under our ownership.
The thing about Port A is that many of our friends who also call it their home port are underway elsewhere on the planet, some in the Gulf, some in the Atlantic, some in the Keys and some even well into the Caribbean Sea. We were fortunate this weekend to run across a few of the cruising crews actually in Port A. That is the ultimate reward of cruising. It is always a treat and one of the reasons cruising is a unique experience.
The other reward on the visit was to simply stand on the beach and face windward into the Gulf. The imagination runs free to think about some things such as the time when, before we left our home port, we would gaze seaward and imagine what’s out there. We often sailed out the jetties into the Gulf for the day only to turn around and head back to port. Even with a perfect day of sailing offshore, it was always a bit of a disappointment to come about and head back in. Having now been out there some, and knowing Why Knot is still out there adds a unique perspective to the visions that onshore sea breeze provided this weekend. The weather was nice and cooperative in recharging the cruising batteries of the soul. It did not take long to visit a few of our favorite Port A places and rekindle the dreams of those days. Our “old slip” is occupied and most of those we knew a couple of years ago have gone but it is as though we never left. But we did. We left and our log books describe those adventures we only dreamed of just two years ago. There is a vast difference between most of those ports and our Home Port yet we will always judge all of them by Port A and the dreams it fostered. We once looked out the jetties and dreamed of other ports. We now know the rewards of taking her to sea is unmatched by almost anything else.
Bear is recovering and we have now started the go box. We have been in contact with other crews we’ve met along the way and most of them are heading South along the AICW. It is the migration which can make the AICW busy at times. We remember how strange it was on a few occasions when we passed a bridge and the tender would say something like “see you next year. “ I am sure they recognize those boats that make the trek every year. We have passed certain parts of the AICW three times now and perhaps some of those bridge tenders remember us.
Comments
Vessel Name: Why Knot
Vessel Make/Model: Beneteau 411 #24 built in Marion, SC
Hailing Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Crew: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
About:
Each other's only date in life. 30 years sailing Texas waters and now on the cruise of dreams (even though there are days when it is hard to believe). About Why Knot Why Knot survived Hurricane Katrina whilst in New Orleans. Year Built: 1998 L.O.A.: 41'-8" Hull Length: 40'-5" L.W.L. [...]
Extra: Scurv (ABSD= able bodied sea dog) signed on in October 2012. Scurv is a toy Schnauzer
Why Knot's Photos - Main
Pics along the way from Portsmouth to Mount Desert Island, Mine
35 Photos
Created 10 August 2013
Some photos taken along the way from the Chesapeake to Maine
33 Photos
Created 18 July 2013
Selected shots along the way from Wilmington to the Chesapeake.
13 Photos
Created 23 July 2012
Pictures of Scurv before and after his first haircut
8 Photos
Created 29 April 2012
Pics of along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia
18 Photos
Created 27 April 2012
Pics taken from Beaufort to Norfolk
23 Photos
Created 11 April 2012
Picture taken from Wilmington to Beaufort, NC
8 Photos
Created 3 April 2012
Photos taken along the waterfront and underway around the Beaufort, SC area
20 Photos
Created 16 July 2011
Pictures taken from Charleston to Wilmington
40 Photos
Created 23 June 2011
The lighthouse in Hopetown, Elbow Cay, Abaco was built in the 1800s. Here are shots from the top
29 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Nippers BG on Geat Guana Cay, Abaco. Posted here because of the stark beauty of the Atlantic shore
7 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of things seen while underway.
16 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of local favorites on Great Guana Cay
34 Photos
Created 9 March 2011
This is perhaps the prettiest of the Abacos that we have visited so far. Then again, there are degrees of perfection
20 Photos
Created 28 February 2011
Pics taken in and around Marsh Harbor and the Great Abaco Island
9 Photos
Created 23 February 2011
Shots taken on Green Turtle Cay of both the Atlantic and Bank side
6 Photos
Created 10 February 2011
These are random shots of Old Bahama Bay on the West End of Grand Bahama Island. This was our official port of entry.
8 Photos
Created 1 February 2011
The Heron spent about two hours sitting not more than 10 feet from Bear. This is his dock.
2 Photos
Created 19 January 2011
These are some pictures of a tug built in 1895 that was in commercial service for 112 years. It will be scuttled today for an artificial reef and dive spot
4 Photos
Created 13 January 2011
Here are some of the boats we have seen that struck us as unusual
6 Photos
Created 8 December 2010
Shots taken after leaving Charleston heading south to the jump off point of the Islands
6 Photos
Created 5 December 2010
Here are some pictures of favorite anchorages, landscapes and other things along the way
13 Photos
Created 26 November 2010
These are photos from our restart city. Having sailed from Port Aransas, Texas we stopped in Charleston for some medical repairs
8 Photos
Created 24 November 2010

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
Why Knot left Texas in January of 2010 bound for no particular harbor. We made ports of call all around the Gulf Coast to the Keys then north up the Atlantic Coast and to the Abacos.