SV Why Knot- No plan, no schedule, no destination.

The passing of my life mate has ended the cruise of Why Knot. Thanks to those that followed her voyages. It gave us wonderful memories and a heck of a life

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
14 October 2015
16 February 2015 | Port Aransas
18 December 2014
02 December 2014 | Port Aransas, Texas
09 October 2014 | Port Aransas
28 September 2014 | City Marina, Port Aransas
04 September 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
01 September 2014
24 August 2014
13 August 2014
09 August 2014 | Clear Lake Shores, Texas
01 August 2014
13 July 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
29 June 2014 | Clear Lake/Canyon Lake
17 June 2014
15 June 2014 | Solomons, MD- same old slip- not moved
12 June 2014
28 May 2014

Unbelievable Bravery

22 April 2012 | Portsmouth, Virginia
Cold and raining- al lot
UNBELIEVABLE BRAVERY
April 21, 2012
There are many museums in the Norfolk/Portsmouth, VA area. Most are maritime or naval in nature but we were directed to one particular museum as a starting place. It is the Mariner’s Museum in Newport News, VA. Boys and Girls, this is a very impressive presentation of the story of this area and of the sea in general. We have visited more than a few such museums and this one tops the list so far. There are actual artifacts of the very earliest days of the sea from dugouts to the age of discovery; from the early and last days of sail to the modern ships. This is a must for any sailor that might find some time in the area. It also happens to be the place that is preserving the USS Monitor, or what’s left of her. Her turret (cheese box), the cannons and many parts of her are in the de-salting tanks to preserve. Not only that but the local Lockheed ship yard reconstructed her hull, deck and turret for display at the museum. One can walk her deck and that is a bit touching. The museum also does an excellent presentation of the battle of the CSS Virginia (aka Merrimack) and the USS Monitor.
The soaking tanks contain the guns, the engine and the turret of the USS Monitor which take about 20 years to preserve. Dinner ware, clocks, crew gear are on display. Letters to loved ones are on display. The two ships met at a place now marked by a lighthouse visible from shore to do battle. It was a dog fight and both sides claimed victory. The Virginia did more damage to the Union fleet by sinking wood ships before the Monitor arrived. They the stood within pistol shot and fired on each other all the time maneuvering in a narrow channel until it was done by retirement of both ships. Shortly thereafter, the Virginia was destroyed by the Confederates nearby to keep her from Union capture. The Monitor was lost in a hurricane off Cape Hatteras not long afterward. She sunk in 260 feet and 16 crew went down with her.
We have yet decided whether or not to let Scurv go with us to these museums. As long as the weather is cool and he is somewhat trained to sit on the back seatback guarding the car he might get to go.
Update: Sunday
Yesterday was a wonderful spring day with 86 degrees and a clear sky. We prepared for a change and moved the dink into the slip and side tied it so that high winds would not beat it or the boat into oblivion. It was hard to believe that a radical weather change was in works. About midnight the whole weather change occurred. As of 1700 today it is 57 degrees, winds NW at 22 mph and raining cats and dogs. It was a good day to visit the Nauticus museum in Norfolk whose main attraction is the USS Wisconsin BB-64. Unlike most WWII ships I have been aboard, this one was active through the Gulf War and launched Tomahawk cruise missiles. That means that she is in good shape. They retained a few Tomahawks and brought them home even though all the other ships launched all they had. Speculation states that perhaps the ones that came home were not exactly conventional explosives. The Navy won’t confirm or deny. Whilst I was doing the history thing, Scurv guarded Bear and the boat. He did a fine job and all aboard did some serious napping. That is a fine was to deal with the weather gods.

Picture is from the bridge of the USS Wisconsin. No wonder the city let them have the best slip
Comments
Vessel Name: Why Knot
Vessel Make/Model: Beneteau 411 #24 built in Marion, SC
Hailing Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Crew: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
About:
Each other's only date in life. 30 years sailing Texas waters and now on the cruise of dreams (even though there are days when it is hard to believe). About Why Knot Why Knot survived Hurricane Katrina whilst in New Orleans. Year Built: 1998 L.O.A.: 41'-8" Hull Length: 40'-5" L.W.L. [...]
Extra: Scurv (ABSD= able bodied sea dog) signed on in October 2012. Scurv is a toy Schnauzer
Why Knot's Photos - Main
Pics along the way from Portsmouth to Mount Desert Island, Mine
35 Photos
Created 10 August 2013
Some photos taken along the way from the Chesapeake to Maine
33 Photos
Created 18 July 2013
Selected shots along the way from Wilmington to the Chesapeake.
13 Photos
Created 23 July 2012
Pictures of Scurv before and after his first haircut
8 Photos
Created 29 April 2012
Pics of along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia
18 Photos
Created 27 April 2012
Pics taken from Beaufort to Norfolk
23 Photos
Created 11 April 2012
Picture taken from Wilmington to Beaufort, NC
8 Photos
Created 3 April 2012
Photos taken along the waterfront and underway around the Beaufort, SC area
20 Photos
Created 16 July 2011
Pictures taken from Charleston to Wilmington
40 Photos
Created 23 June 2011
The lighthouse in Hopetown, Elbow Cay, Abaco was built in the 1800s. Here are shots from the top
29 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Nippers BG on Geat Guana Cay, Abaco. Posted here because of the stark beauty of the Atlantic shore
7 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of things seen while underway.
16 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of local favorites on Great Guana Cay
34 Photos
Created 9 March 2011
This is perhaps the prettiest of the Abacos that we have visited so far. Then again, there are degrees of perfection
20 Photos
Created 28 February 2011
Pics taken in and around Marsh Harbor and the Great Abaco Island
9 Photos
Created 23 February 2011
Shots taken on Green Turtle Cay of both the Atlantic and Bank side
6 Photos
Created 10 February 2011
These are random shots of Old Bahama Bay on the West End of Grand Bahama Island. This was our official port of entry.
8 Photos
Created 1 February 2011
The Heron spent about two hours sitting not more than 10 feet from Bear. This is his dock.
2 Photos
Created 19 January 2011
These are some pictures of a tug built in 1895 that was in commercial service for 112 years. It will be scuttled today for an artificial reef and dive spot
4 Photos
Created 13 January 2011
Here are some of the boats we have seen that struck us as unusual
6 Photos
Created 8 December 2010
Shots taken after leaving Charleston heading south to the jump off point of the Islands
6 Photos
Created 5 December 2010
Here are some pictures of favorite anchorages, landscapes and other things along the way
13 Photos
Created 26 November 2010
These are photos from our restart city. Having sailed from Port Aransas, Texas we stopped in Charleston for some medical repairs
8 Photos
Created 24 November 2010

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
Why Knot left Texas in January of 2010 bound for no particular harbor. We made ports of call all around the Gulf Coast to the Keys then north up the Atlantic Coast and to the Abacos.