SV Why Knot- No plan, no schedule, no destination.

The passing of my life mate has ended the cruise of Why Knot. Thanks to those that followed her voyages. It gave us wonderful memories and a heck of a life

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
14 October 2015
16 February 2015 | Port Aransas
18 December 2014
02 December 2014 | Port Aransas, Texas
09 October 2014 | Port Aransas
28 September 2014 | City Marina, Port Aransas
04 September 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
01 September 2014
24 August 2014
13 August 2014
09 August 2014 | Clear Lake Shores, Texas
01 August 2014
13 July 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
29 June 2014 | Clear Lake/Canyon Lake
17 June 2014
15 June 2014 | Solomons, MD- same old slip- not moved
12 June 2014
28 May 2014

Jamestown to Yorktown

27 April 2012
spring- fickle
MUSEUM OVERDOSE
April 26, 2012
Installment one- the early days and the Revolution
Two days ago we decided to take a road trip and do a couple of nights on terra firma. The idea was to stop at some history sites and basically get out of the boat for a night or two. This started what I now must admit was the first time in my life I achieved museum overdose. Day one was a short trip to the very beginnings of European history on the Continent. Armed with my handy dandy Senior Pass from the National Parks Service we got underway around 0900. The first stop was Jamestown which I mentioned before occurred 13 years before Plymouth.
Jamestown- established 1607 was actually a commercial enterprise under the charter granted by James I to whip over to the new land and set up a colony. They arrived (all 104 of the survivors of the little cruise) on May 13 and promptly started to die off. Seems someone forgot to mention that drinking brackish water ,feeding the local bugs intravenously, and not subscribing to Rosetta Stone software to learn the local language was not a good thing. Now here is where the real Capt. John Smith and the local cutie Pocahontas whipped up some legends. Back to the survival story- folks kept booking passage for the new world and yet by the summer only 60 of the 300 were still alive. Settlements of a couple dozen folks were set up around the original fort and settlement on James Island. Ok, so the locals (that would be the first Americans) tried to get along and deal with the new folks but things went downhill and when the discourse turned to snuffing out 347 settlers in 1622 the Crown decides to revoke the charter. After all a full one third of the settlers either starved or were used as target practice for arrows, spears and axes. In short, from 1607 on the settlement was a study in survival. As the tee shirt says, “Jamestown, 1607, When surviving wasn’t a game”. Like all such early colonies, this is a story of great spirit and dedication. The British flag flies over old fort grounds and Queen Elizabeth actually visited the place. There is an active archaeological effort in place to discover more graves and features of the place.
There is a very nice history trail called the Colonial Parkway which runs from Jamestown, through Williamsburg to Yorktown. Along the way, there are markers to show where folks did stuff. The next stop was Williamsburg. One could spend a few days there just walking around the “living history” part. There is a section that is about a mile by one half of original buildings where folks dress in period clothes, speak the language of the day and demonstrate life as it was. They won’t acknowledge any events beyond the era. One will not see watches or electronics. We drove around the old town and then got back on the Colonial Trail toward Yorktown. It is a short distance but if one stops to read all the markers, it takes an hour or so to get to Yorktown along the York River. Yorktown was under siege two times in its history: once by General Washington and a French General Comte Jena Baptist de Rochambeau against Lord Cornwallis in 1781 and once by Union General McClellan against Confederate Major General Magruder in 1862. Without the French blockade of the entrance to the Chesapeake, the final victory would not have happened. So there, we do own something to the French after all.
Needless to say, a former Infantry officer can appreciate the fortifications, the distances between muskets and the valor that must have been displayed by both sides. Methinks that Lord Cornwallis diminished his honor a bit by ordering a subordinate to surrender his sword. This was the last battle of the Revolutionary War and yet General Washington maintained a standing army until the formal end at the Treaty of Paris some two years later 1783. The end of hostilities was not permanent since three decades later the British came at us again. Standing on that field was definitely worth the effort to get there.
Next installment is about the Civil War. Day one saw us visiting three museums. I should say that Bear and Scurv enjoyed the wonderful weather whilst I stumbled around.

Comments
Vessel Name: Why Knot
Vessel Make/Model: Beneteau 411 #24 built in Marion, SC
Hailing Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Crew: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
About:
Each other's only date in life. 30 years sailing Texas waters and now on the cruise of dreams (even though there are days when it is hard to believe). About Why Knot Why Knot survived Hurricane Katrina whilst in New Orleans. Year Built: 1998 L.O.A.: 41'-8" Hull Length: 40'-5" L.W.L. [...]
Extra: Scurv (ABSD= able bodied sea dog) signed on in October 2012. Scurv is a toy Schnauzer
Why Knot's Photos - Main
Pics along the way from Portsmouth to Mount Desert Island, Mine
35 Photos
Created 10 August 2013
Some photos taken along the way from the Chesapeake to Maine
33 Photos
Created 18 July 2013
Selected shots along the way from Wilmington to the Chesapeake.
13 Photos
Created 23 July 2012
Pictures of Scurv before and after his first haircut
8 Photos
Created 29 April 2012
Pics of along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia
18 Photos
Created 27 April 2012
Pics taken from Beaufort to Norfolk
23 Photos
Created 11 April 2012
Picture taken from Wilmington to Beaufort, NC
8 Photos
Created 3 April 2012
Photos taken along the waterfront and underway around the Beaufort, SC area
20 Photos
Created 16 July 2011
Pictures taken from Charleston to Wilmington
40 Photos
Created 23 June 2011
The lighthouse in Hopetown, Elbow Cay, Abaco was built in the 1800s. Here are shots from the top
29 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Nippers BG on Geat Guana Cay, Abaco. Posted here because of the stark beauty of the Atlantic shore
7 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of things seen while underway.
16 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of local favorites on Great Guana Cay
34 Photos
Created 9 March 2011
This is perhaps the prettiest of the Abacos that we have visited so far. Then again, there are degrees of perfection
20 Photos
Created 28 February 2011
Pics taken in and around Marsh Harbor and the Great Abaco Island
9 Photos
Created 23 February 2011
Shots taken on Green Turtle Cay of both the Atlantic and Bank side
6 Photos
Created 10 February 2011
These are random shots of Old Bahama Bay on the West End of Grand Bahama Island. This was our official port of entry.
8 Photos
Created 1 February 2011
The Heron spent about two hours sitting not more than 10 feet from Bear. This is his dock.
2 Photos
Created 19 January 2011
These are some pictures of a tug built in 1895 that was in commercial service for 112 years. It will be scuttled today for an artificial reef and dive spot
4 Photos
Created 13 January 2011
Here are some of the boats we have seen that struck us as unusual
6 Photos
Created 8 December 2010
Shots taken after leaving Charleston heading south to the jump off point of the Islands
6 Photos
Created 5 December 2010
Here are some pictures of favorite anchorages, landscapes and other things along the way
13 Photos
Created 26 November 2010
These are photos from our restart city. Having sailed from Port Aransas, Texas we stopped in Charleston for some medical repairs
8 Photos
Created 24 November 2010

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
Why Knot left Texas in January of 2010 bound for no particular harbor. We made ports of call all around the Gulf Coast to the Keys then north up the Atlantic Coast and to the Abacos.