SV Why Knot- No plan, no schedule, no destination.

The passing of my life mate has ended the cruise of Why Knot. Thanks to those that followed her voyages. It gave us wonderful memories and a heck of a life

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
14 October 2015
16 February 2015 | Port Aransas
18 December 2014
02 December 2014 | Port Aransas, Texas
09 October 2014 | Port Aransas
28 September 2014 | City Marina, Port Aransas
04 September 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
01 September 2014
24 August 2014
13 August 2014
09 August 2014 | Clear Lake Shores, Texas
01 August 2014
13 July 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
29 June 2014 | Clear Lake/Canyon Lake
17 June 2014
15 June 2014 | Solomons, MD- same old slip- not moved
12 June 2014
28 May 2014

Home Waters

13 July 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
Hotternheck
Home Waters

We have been back in Texas for several weeks and are getting land legs back. We are starting to stand steady on land yet we don't make fast turns lest things turn clumsy quickly. Honest, officer, we have had noting to drink. The work on Why Knot is almost done and the mast was stepped yesterday. We admit to being out of shape dealing with the heat of the area so that makes boat work a little difficult for this old crew. So, we will take our time off loading additional cruise gear. The difference between near port and long distance cruising is remarkable. The clothing aboard shrinks to a few seasonal items as does the number of towels and bedding gear. There is no need for a spare jar or two of mustard. We no longer require a case of gizmo batteries nor cruising charts and guides for the North Atlantic. We might just see parts of the cabin not visible for four years.

Meanwhile, the crews we met along the way are mostly heading north now. Ruffian, the Brits, have made it to Nova Scotia if not to Newfoundland and Labrador, We wonder if they are heading back to the homeland. Who knows? Others are heading to New England if the hurricanes don't head them off. My memories of those waters is clear and I know in the near future they will take on mythical characteristics in our memories as we start to sail the coastal waters of Texas. The rugged headlands of New England and the mist of the low country of the Carolinas are part of us now. Although we did come home from time to time during the past four years of our cruise, we sort of stayed in the cruise mentally. When we were home, we were working on the returns to the boat and the waters in which she was swimming. I have to admit that the cruise last year to Maine happened almost accidentally. We left Texas thinking that the destination was the Chesapeake but somehow the call to see New England happened, In many ways, we are feeling as though we are just returning to our home waters after a four year absence, sort of the way it may have felt for the whalers of old when they made home port. Now, the mission is to settle back into the local coastal waters that started the whole thing. It was, after all, the lure to go out the jetties of Port A and just keep going someday; to cast off the need to turn around at the rigs and head home that fueled the dream that fueled the effort. I think it is safe to say that the bucket list is shorter and that the items now checked off were in the aggregate a double wowzer.

So, now we have a different sort of cruising in our future. We will get back into the the usual gunk holes of the area but there will be a difference: We have three complete log books of memories of waters deeper and way colder than CC Bay and the lower Gulf but certainly no better. The whale count is much lower but they are here. There are no lobster boats but the shrimpers are no less exotic, if that is the word. If anything, the anchorages here are as remote as the Basin in Maine. Unlike before, when someone walks the dock past us and asks " have you ever gone anywhere on your boat?" we can smile a bit and say that we did a little distance cruising. We will miss rounding an unfamiliar headland to see around the corner.

Photo- sleeping
Comments
Vessel Name: Why Knot
Vessel Make/Model: Beneteau 411 #24 built in Marion, SC
Hailing Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Crew: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
About:
Each other's only date in life. 30 years sailing Texas waters and now on the cruise of dreams (even though there are days when it is hard to believe). About Why Knot Why Knot survived Hurricane Katrina whilst in New Orleans. Year Built: 1998 L.O.A.: 41'-8" Hull Length: 40'-5" L.W.L. [...]
Extra: Scurv (ABSD= able bodied sea dog) signed on in October 2012. Scurv is a toy Schnauzer
Why Knot's Photos - Main
Pics along the way from Portsmouth to Mount Desert Island, Mine
35 Photos
Created 10 August 2013
Some photos taken along the way from the Chesapeake to Maine
33 Photos
Created 18 July 2013
Selected shots along the way from Wilmington to the Chesapeake.
13 Photos
Created 23 July 2012
Pictures of Scurv before and after his first haircut
8 Photos
Created 29 April 2012
Pics of along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia
18 Photos
Created 27 April 2012
Pics taken from Beaufort to Norfolk
23 Photos
Created 11 April 2012
Picture taken from Wilmington to Beaufort, NC
8 Photos
Created 3 April 2012
Photos taken along the waterfront and underway around the Beaufort, SC area
20 Photos
Created 16 July 2011
Pictures taken from Charleston to Wilmington
40 Photos
Created 23 June 2011
The lighthouse in Hopetown, Elbow Cay, Abaco was built in the 1800s. Here are shots from the top
29 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Nippers BG on Geat Guana Cay, Abaco. Posted here because of the stark beauty of the Atlantic shore
7 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of things seen while underway.
16 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of local favorites on Great Guana Cay
34 Photos
Created 9 March 2011
This is perhaps the prettiest of the Abacos that we have visited so far. Then again, there are degrees of perfection
20 Photos
Created 28 February 2011
Pics taken in and around Marsh Harbor and the Great Abaco Island
9 Photos
Created 23 February 2011
Shots taken on Green Turtle Cay of both the Atlantic and Bank side
6 Photos
Created 10 February 2011
These are random shots of Old Bahama Bay on the West End of Grand Bahama Island. This was our official port of entry.
8 Photos
Created 1 February 2011
The Heron spent about two hours sitting not more than 10 feet from Bear. This is his dock.
2 Photos
Created 19 January 2011
These are some pictures of a tug built in 1895 that was in commercial service for 112 years. It will be scuttled today for an artificial reef and dive spot
4 Photos
Created 13 January 2011
Here are some of the boats we have seen that struck us as unusual
6 Photos
Created 8 December 2010
Shots taken after leaving Charleston heading south to the jump off point of the Islands
6 Photos
Created 5 December 2010
Here are some pictures of favorite anchorages, landscapes and other things along the way
13 Photos
Created 26 November 2010
These are photos from our restart city. Having sailed from Port Aransas, Texas we stopped in Charleston for some medical repairs
8 Photos
Created 24 November 2010

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
Why Knot left Texas in January of 2010 bound for no particular harbor. We made ports of call all around the Gulf Coast to the Keys then north up the Atlantic Coast and to the Abacos.