SV Why Knot- No plan, no schedule, no destination.

The passing of my life mate has ended the cruise of Why Knot. Thanks to those that followed her voyages. It gave us wonderful memories and a heck of a life

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
14 October 2015
16 February 2015 | Port Aransas
18 December 2014
02 December 2014 | Port Aransas, Texas
09 October 2014 | Port Aransas
28 September 2014 | City Marina, Port Aransas
04 September 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
01 September 2014
24 August 2014
13 August 2014
09 August 2014 | Clear Lake Shores, Texas
01 August 2014
13 July 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
29 June 2014 | Clear Lake/Canyon Lake
17 June 2014
15 June 2014 | Solomons, MD- same old slip- not moved
12 June 2014
28 May 2014

Transitions of the Mind

01 August 2014
Transition of the Mind

There are the obvious lifestyle changes associated with being back on land but there are some things that are not obvious at first. The larger everything at home is nice and perhaps the real icing on the cake is the dish washer. That is one duty I don't miss about being aboard. The other is the constant quest for quarters to use in the next laundry room wherever it might be,. The silence of a land dwelling is defining. Pumps, water slap on the hull and wind make the cruising world actually very noisy yet somehow soothing to the soul of a sailor. The sounds on a boat provide the constant feedback as to the health of the boat. More than a few times I have been awakened from a REM sleep by a barely discernible sound, perhaps not even noticeable to my mate, that warns me of a change in our world. On other nights when most people cannot sleep for the noise, my sleep went uninterrupted because all the sounds had been previously registered as normal. Wind in the wire and the motion on the water makes for near perfect sleep atmosphere not possible on land save a shaded hammock on a soft summer morning. Those things do not happen on land often.

I had to make a run to the store yesterday, which in itself is a treat. One does not do that on a cruise lest one have some form of transportation such as a bicycle. I was standing in the store considering a purchase that would not have happened on our cruise. You see, it would not have fit into my backpack. Then another obvious thing hit me. I do not need to get the giant sized dish soap because we won't be away from a store very far. The consideration on the cruise was how long it would be until resupply. Thus, case lot quantities and large bottles were necessary and did pose a challenge when transported by that backpack. We did not buy just a six pack of soda, we made it a case or two. On land we can think small and fresh. There is no need to eat our way to the bottom of our provisions before leaving for a break. It is a way different mind set on land.

So, I had the new bottom paint applied by the yard and after the fact it dawned on me that I overlooked something which will be obvious until the next haulout: Why Knot sits at least four inches higher in the water than when she was rigged for the cruise. That leaves a four inch band of bottom paint exposed above the waterline. Guess that will identify us to those who notice that we had an extended cruise. That waterline was raised twice along the way.

We have traded sea gulls, dolphin and crabs for squirrels, fox and deer. We are no no longer fixated on the weather forecast. The bed no longer moves to the rhythm of the sea. If it moves on land then there are a whole set of other problems (at least in our age group). The vehicles are ready to make the provision run any time. Scurv gets extended land runs and digging at will for the critters under the rocks. Why Knot is still waiting for someone to install the infamous fuel pump but otherwise is almost ready for her overnighter to Port Aransas. Bear gets her favorite local tv shows and I water the newly planted grass whilst day dreaming about Block Island, or Boothbay or the Chesapeake or a view around the corner at Seguin Island. Pnobscot Bays beautiful schooners framed on a northern summer cloudless blue sky as only they can be are still fresh in the memory. Enough of that. I have to keep the seeds wet and it is supposed to be a hundred degrees today.
Comments
Vessel Name: Why Knot
Vessel Make/Model: Beneteau 411 #24 built in Marion, SC
Hailing Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Crew: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
About:
Each other's only date in life. 30 years sailing Texas waters and now on the cruise of dreams (even though there are days when it is hard to believe). About Why Knot Why Knot survived Hurricane Katrina whilst in New Orleans. Year Built: 1998 L.O.A.: 41'-8" Hull Length: 40'-5" L.W.L. [...]
Extra: Scurv (ABSD= able bodied sea dog) signed on in October 2012. Scurv is a toy Schnauzer
Why Knot's Photos - Main
Pics along the way from Portsmouth to Mount Desert Island, Mine
35 Photos
Created 10 August 2013
Some photos taken along the way from the Chesapeake to Maine
33 Photos
Created 18 July 2013
Selected shots along the way from Wilmington to the Chesapeake.
13 Photos
Created 23 July 2012
Pictures of Scurv before and after his first haircut
8 Photos
Created 29 April 2012
Pics of along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia
18 Photos
Created 27 April 2012
Pics taken from Beaufort to Norfolk
23 Photos
Created 11 April 2012
Picture taken from Wilmington to Beaufort, NC
8 Photos
Created 3 April 2012
Photos taken along the waterfront and underway around the Beaufort, SC area
20 Photos
Created 16 July 2011
Pictures taken from Charleston to Wilmington
40 Photos
Created 23 June 2011
The lighthouse in Hopetown, Elbow Cay, Abaco was built in the 1800s. Here are shots from the top
29 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Nippers BG on Geat Guana Cay, Abaco. Posted here because of the stark beauty of the Atlantic shore
7 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of things seen while underway.
16 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of local favorites on Great Guana Cay
34 Photos
Created 9 March 2011
This is perhaps the prettiest of the Abacos that we have visited so far. Then again, there are degrees of perfection
20 Photos
Created 28 February 2011
Pics taken in and around Marsh Harbor and the Great Abaco Island
9 Photos
Created 23 February 2011
Shots taken on Green Turtle Cay of both the Atlantic and Bank side
6 Photos
Created 10 February 2011
These are random shots of Old Bahama Bay on the West End of Grand Bahama Island. This was our official port of entry.
8 Photos
Created 1 February 2011
The Heron spent about two hours sitting not more than 10 feet from Bear. This is his dock.
2 Photos
Created 19 January 2011
These are some pictures of a tug built in 1895 that was in commercial service for 112 years. It will be scuttled today for an artificial reef and dive spot
4 Photos
Created 13 January 2011
Here are some of the boats we have seen that struck us as unusual
6 Photos
Created 8 December 2010
Shots taken after leaving Charleston heading south to the jump off point of the Islands
6 Photos
Created 5 December 2010
Here are some pictures of favorite anchorages, landscapes and other things along the way
13 Photos
Created 26 November 2010
These are photos from our restart city. Having sailed from Port Aransas, Texas we stopped in Charleston for some medical repairs
8 Photos
Created 24 November 2010

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
Why Knot left Texas in January of 2010 bound for no particular harbor. We made ports of call all around the Gulf Coast to the Keys then north up the Atlantic Coast and to the Abacos.