SV Why Knot- No plan, no schedule, no destination.

The passing of my life mate has ended the cruise of Why Knot. Thanks to those that followed her voyages. It gave us wonderful memories and a heck of a life

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
14 October 2015
16 February 2015 | Port Aransas
18 December 2014
02 December 2014 | Port Aransas, Texas
09 October 2014 | Port Aransas
28 September 2014 | City Marina, Port Aransas
04 September 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
01 September 2014
24 August 2014
13 August 2014
09 August 2014 | Clear Lake Shores, Texas
01 August 2014
13 July 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
29 June 2014 | Clear Lake/Canyon Lake
17 June 2014
15 June 2014 | Solomons, MD- same old slip- not moved
12 June 2014
28 May 2014

Memories and Realities

04 September 2014 | Clear Lake, Texas
We sailed back into Boothbay, Maine harbor a few minutes ago at least in our memory. With the help of Brown's Wharf webcam, we were visiting one of our favorite harbors of the cruse. Ah, what a wonderful place this time of year with the cool temps and crystal blue northern fall sky. It is a serene piece of New England forever home to lobstermen who will share their world with transient sailors for a few months then most likely enjoy watching their sails disappear over the horizon come fall. The square riggers of pirates and patriots have given way to those in faster boats with televisions and coolers but none the less in absolute awe of the sea. The sights, sounds and smells of that place is recorded in the permanent parts of whatever memory we have.

Bear is now truly recovering and this weekend will be the first time she will go aboard Why Knot since late June. There is still work to be done aboard (as there always is) so the bilge coolie (that would be me) will see to it they the Admiral, Scurv, ABSD and Why Knot are treated well. With the entire crew aboard, WK is whole and ready for the visit.

There is a story about the aborted final leg to our home port. I had guest crew recruited for the effort and when it was apparent we were needing to scrap the sail and come home to be with Bear. I decided to move WK to a slip and away from the yard. To that end, we pulled out of the yard slip and motored around to the other slip. It was a typical hot and sticky August afternoon. Prepatory to getting to the new slip, I asked Paul to man the bow line and Frank to mind the aft line. Steve was to mind the other aft line but remained under the Bimini. Just as we approached the slip, requiring some tight maneuvering due to traffic and wind, Neptune decided to unzip the block sized black cloud above us. No one anticipated the amount of water in that cloud. Unzip is the right term as that little cloud was uncompressed into a much bigger container. Instantly, I could no longer see Paul. However, the idea was that Paul would cleat off the bow line immediately thus allowing the boat to come against the dock starboard side. The wind and rain added a bit of urgency lest we drift into something in an uncontrolled way. So through the wind and rain I suggested rather loudly that he needed to get that done. Already, the wind was having its way and things were about to get nasty. Still no evidence that any attempt was being made to cleat off. A slightly louder coaxing but nothing. Then the rain subsided a bit and I could see Paul (might I add that Paul's foulie was warm and safe in the cabin) through the still blinding rain. I suggested, sort of, that he expedite the cleaning. He heard me this time and suggested that I could do a few things with the suggestion. Seems the problem was that the dock had no cleats whatsoever. I then politely asked if he might tie off to the piling to which he was attached. The light from the bulb above his noggin was blinding. The dock has "tide risers" with slip rings to which one secures dock lines. The tide risers are pipes that allow ted dock lines to rise and fall with the tides. They are a great idea for storm surges. In all our cruising, this is the first time to see docks with them. So, Paul and Frank were sacrificed (got really wet) in that learning experience. I can still see Paul standing on dock looking for the mystery cleats while drifting in and out of view. Just as all dock lines were secured, that little cloud drifted away and the sun turned the sauna on.
Comments
Vessel Name: Why Knot
Vessel Make/Model: Beneteau 411 #24 built in Marion, SC
Hailing Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Crew: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
About:
Each other's only date in life. 30 years sailing Texas waters and now on the cruise of dreams (even though there are days when it is hard to believe). About Why Knot Why Knot survived Hurricane Katrina whilst in New Orleans. Year Built: 1998 L.O.A.: 41'-8" Hull Length: 40'-5" L.W.L. [...]
Extra: Scurv (ABSD= able bodied sea dog) signed on in October 2012. Scurv is a toy Schnauzer
Why Knot's Photos - Main
Pics along the way from Portsmouth to Mount Desert Island, Mine
35 Photos
Created 10 August 2013
Some photos taken along the way from the Chesapeake to Maine
33 Photos
Created 18 July 2013
Selected shots along the way from Wilmington to the Chesapeake.
13 Photos
Created 23 July 2012
Pictures of Scurv before and after his first haircut
8 Photos
Created 29 April 2012
Pics of along the Colonial Parkway in Virginia
18 Photos
Created 27 April 2012
Pics taken from Beaufort to Norfolk
23 Photos
Created 11 April 2012
Picture taken from Wilmington to Beaufort, NC
8 Photos
Created 3 April 2012
Photos taken along the waterfront and underway around the Beaufort, SC area
20 Photos
Created 16 July 2011
Pictures taken from Charleston to Wilmington
40 Photos
Created 23 June 2011
The lighthouse in Hopetown, Elbow Cay, Abaco was built in the 1800s. Here are shots from the top
29 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Nippers BG on Geat Guana Cay, Abaco. Posted here because of the stark beauty of the Atlantic shore
7 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of things seen while underway.
16 Photos
Created 1 April 2011
Pictures of local favorites on Great Guana Cay
34 Photos
Created 9 March 2011
This is perhaps the prettiest of the Abacos that we have visited so far. Then again, there are degrees of perfection
20 Photos
Created 28 February 2011
Pics taken in and around Marsh Harbor and the Great Abaco Island
9 Photos
Created 23 February 2011
Shots taken on Green Turtle Cay of both the Atlantic and Bank side
6 Photos
Created 10 February 2011
These are random shots of Old Bahama Bay on the West End of Grand Bahama Island. This was our official port of entry.
8 Photos
Created 1 February 2011
The Heron spent about two hours sitting not more than 10 feet from Bear. This is his dock.
2 Photos
Created 19 January 2011
These are some pictures of a tug built in 1895 that was in commercial service for 112 years. It will be scuttled today for an artificial reef and dive spot
4 Photos
Created 13 January 2011
Here are some of the boats we have seen that struck us as unusual
6 Photos
Created 8 December 2010
Shots taken after leaving Charleston heading south to the jump off point of the Islands
6 Photos
Created 5 December 2010
Here are some pictures of favorite anchorages, landscapes and other things along the way
13 Photos
Created 26 November 2010
These are photos from our restart city. Having sailed from Port Aransas, Texas we stopped in Charleston for some medical repairs
8 Photos
Created 24 November 2010

Dreams in Works

Who: Bear (Jo) and Bligh (Howell) Cooper and Scurv
Port: Port Aransas, Texas
Our greatest challenge was to actually bring in the dock lines at our home port and get going. Next came the actual act of living aboard which is way different than weekending or the occasional extended sail. This is life avoiding causing your mate to drop stuff or run into bulkheads. This is having so much stuff aboard that one has to inventory. This is life without land transportation in strange places. This is meeting folks and hating to say good bye, then looking forward to the time when courses cross again, to the surprise of seeing them at some unexpected place.
Why Knot left Texas in January of 2010 bound for no particular harbor. We made ports of call all around the Gulf Coast to the Keys then north up the Atlantic Coast and to the Abacos.