Around the world with S/V Zephyr

The adventures of Bill & Tracy as they fulfill their lifes dream of sailing the world. We've dreamed of this for years and now is the time while the health is still good and there is money in the kitty to make it come true.

30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
27 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
27 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
27 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
27 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
27 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
27 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
27 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina, Grenada
21 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
21 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina, Grenada
15 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina, Grenadac
13 August 2016 | Atlanta airport
12 August 2016 | Aurora, Colorado
11 August 2016 | Aurora,Colorado
04 August 2016 | Aurora, Colorado

Into bigger vats.

30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
After its initial settling in big bowls, it goes into big concrete vats for eight days. Used to use wood barrels but built concrete vats about fifteen years ago.

Bubbling away

30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
As it fermenting, it gives off gas making bubbles.

Into the vats it goes.

30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
After crushing, it's poured into vats where it get moved every day to another vat and eventually on to fermenting

Sugar cane crushing

30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
Here's the cane getting crushed for it juice. The rest of the cane is used to burn for heat to cook the juice later in the process.

Suger cane.

30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
Here's the sugar cane getting fed up a conveyor to be crushed. All run by the water wheel.

Touring Grenada

30 August 2016 | Secret Harbour Marina,Grenada
Bill/some sprinkles
We've rolled over to another Monday and we have stayed busy. Last Friday we went on a tour of the island hitting chocolate processing and manufacturing plants. Rum distilleries and more.
We had amazing views as we worked our way inland passing overlooks of the bays for a short while and then up and over the tallest point on the island at 1900 feet. Lush hills and valleys showed that it was indeed the rainy season here on Grenada. We stopped at one of the many waterfalls on the inland and several of the folks in the bus changed into swimsuits and took a plunge into the water. At the falls, there were two men that were "licensed by the government to jump into the water at the base of the falls. Of course they had a box nearby for tips for doing the jumping. There were tables service up along the pathway for souvenirs and even a strolling singer trying to make some money. He didn't do to well I think.
As we continued on, Cuddy, our driver and tour director gave us some history of the island and pulled over numerous times to show us some of the foliage along the road. Ginger, Allspice, Lemongrass, Cinnamon and more there for the harvesting. Fruits and vegetables are so plenty that he says there is no reason for anyone to go hungry on the island.
We visited a cocoa processing plant and saw how the coco beans are shelled, piled in bins to ferment and left. In the sun to dry. The husks are removed and the beans are then bagged to be sent along to other processing plants. We visited one of those a short while later. The beans are crushed and pulverized and mixed with other ingredients and then mixed into a slurry and stirred and stirred for hours in vats that had the chocolate looking like it was cake batter. That batter is then poured into molds, wrapped after it cools and sent on to retailers around the world. We got to try different blends of chocolate in varying percentage of purity. From 60% clear up to 100% chocolate. I worked my way down from the 100% to the least pure at 60% and that where I found the best taste for me(Tracy too). The 100%was just too harsh for out tastes. We ended up buying five bars, two that were the 60% pure and three that were 60% but had small bits of 100% in it too. They will be sitting in our freezer for a while as we have a big bag of Hershey Kisses already open. As it is, this chocolate,even at just 60% will take a while to eat as its just too rich to eat much at our next sitting.
We were off the the "River Rum Factory". This factory dates back over 200 years and uses much of the same machinery and techniques that have been used for generations. They still harvest sugarcane and crush it to get the sugar they need for processing instead of using molasses as many companies do. The liquid from the sugarcane is fed into copper bowls where it is ladled every day from one bowl to the next through four different huge bowls. It's then forwarded to massive concrete vats that are left to mature for eight days before continuing on to the copper cooker that distills it down to the rum product. It's a ten to one ratio, so for every 100 gallons that goes in, only 10 gallons games out. They only sell on Grenada as they of July produce about 100,000 barrels a year and the alcohol content is so high that it can't be sold overseas(so we were told). This rum is up to 80% alcohol. That works out to 160 proof, right up there with "Everclear"(memories of college). We had a tasting session where we got to try several of their varieties. They had the "hard stuff"(160 proof) as well as a blend of fruit juice rum punch and even on mixed with chocolate. We walked away with a bottle of the chocolate. Should be great pound over ice cream.
We stopped at an out of the way restaurant along our way for a mixture of local food. Chicken, fish, rice with corn, noodles that had set a bit too long and hardened into a solid mass, as well as a nice salad. One thing different was that a sauce was provided that was full of hot spices. I put just a bit on my rice and noodles and I was very glad there was water on the table as it set my taste buds screaming.
In the end, the tour for us both as well as lunch and admission to the different places we visited cost about $80US. We left at 0900 and didn't get back till close the 1800 so it was a full day at a great price.
The picture is of one of the buildings at the rum factory. Still run by a waterwheel.
Vessel Name: Zephyr
Vessel Make/Model: Shin Fa 458
Hailing Port: Denver, Colorado
Crew: Bill & Tracy Hudson
About: We've been sailing since the early 80's on lakes in New Mexico and Colorado and finally took the plunge and bought Zephyr.
Extra: We moved on board in April of 2008 and have been working and sailing her ever since. Up to Alaska and down to Mexico and across the Pacific to Fiji. We're now in South Africa making our way toward the Cape.
Home Page: http::/www.sailblogs.com/member/svzephyr
Zephyr's Photos - San Juanico along the Baja.
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