The Tomlin-Davies Crew on Annalee

Vessel Name: Annalee
Vessel Make/Model: Hallberg Rassy HR43
Crew: Si, Mel, Will & Millie
24 August 2017 | Bay of Roses
20 August 2017 | Golfe de Juan
14 August 2017 | Anse de Cavaliere
12 August 2017 | Playa Guilloia
09 August 2017 | Roses
08 August 2017 | Palamos
07 August 2017 | Costa Dorada
Recent Blog Posts
24 August 2017 | Bay of Roses

Back to Spain

We finally managed to get away from Golfe de Juan. It was a really nice place but it wasn't part of the plan to spend so long there!

20 August 2017 | Golfe de Juan

Stuck in Golfe de Juan (or the black hole)

There has been no blog post for a few days as we've had, what seems like an escalating set of problems that needed sorting. On our way to Golfe de Juan - for what was planned to be a one-night stopover to refuel, water and visit the international fireworks display in Cannes - we experienced more engine [...]

14 August 2017 | Anse de Cavaliere

Finally in France

We managed to finally get over to France in a weather window. Leaving NE Spain on Sunday morning, we sailed until 23:30 to reach a town called La Ciotat which has a marina and a large bay, in which we anchored.

12 August 2017 | Playa Guilloia

Playa Gulloia

On Friday we moved from Roses to Cadaqués in windy conditions again -although thankfully the sea was smooth as the wind was gusting from the land and we were hugging the coast line. It was a relatively short journey of about three hours and we picked up a mooring buoy off the very picturesque town [...]

09 August 2017 | Roses

From Puerto de Roses

Just to bring you all up to date with our (so far) eventful trip. We sailed from our first overnight stop in St Feliu de Guixols heading as far north as we could manage. As we were about an hour and a half into our trip heading into heavy seas and strong winds on the nose of 20-25kts the engine started [...]

08 August 2017 | Palamos

Monday 7th August

Hello everyone- it is your favourite Annalee crew member, Captain Millie.

Back to Spain

24 August 2017 | Bay of Roses
Skipper, NE 4, pt. Cloudy, slight sea
We finally managed to get away from Golfe de Juan. It was a really nice place but it wasn't part of the plan to spend so long there!

We sailed into o a bay next to St Tropez. It was a nice quiet spot, tucked just around the corner. After food, we took the dinghy into the town itself ( see picture album). The next morning we made an early start - 06:00 to put in a longish sail westwards towards the Calanques to the east of Marseille. These are spectacular limestone cliffs with fissures and bays eroded into them and we found a very pleasant one called Sormiou. There was paddle boarding and Mel even made it ashore for her walk to keep that step count up!

The original plan had been to spend a few days pottering along the Calanques before heading back across the Bay De Lion but the enforced lay up and the weather put paid to that plan. Looking at the forecasts there was a small weather window before some more bad weather was due to set in across the bay ( by 'weather window' I mean merely very windy rather than extremely windy). We set off at 05:00 the next day to make the 17 1/2 hour crossing into increasing wind and seas. We arrived to NE Spain about 22:30 and were anchored by 23:00. The crossing was not too bad we had a maximum of 27kt winds but some very lumpy seas for the last 3 hours.

After a night's rest (interrupted by a heavy downpour at about 05:00 - which lead to a scramble to shut hatches and windows) we set off at 10:30 back south to get out of the way of the impending heavy weather up around the NE cape. It's an area that deserves its fearsome reputation, we found that the wind was consistently much higher that the forecast around the cape as were the seas. Not somewhere I'd be in a hurry to return to!

Hopefully a couple of days easy sailing with short hops between anchorages towards Barcelona.

Stuck in Golfe de Juan (or the black hole)

20 August 2017 | Golfe de Juan
Skipper - sunny put cloudy 35 deg
There has been no blog post for a few days as we've had, what seems like an escalating set of problems that needed sorting. On our way to Golfe de Juan - for what was planned to be a one-night stopover to refuel, water and visit the international fireworks display in Cannes - we experienced more engine running problems.

The skipper duly changed the filters and cleaned things out and... the engine started, ran for a minute and died. A further inspection revealed no fuel reaching the injectors from the fuel pump (a good thing as it turns out). Fearing a broken fuel pump, then engineer was called in and after the best part of Friday was taken with him disassembling the fuel system from the tank forward, he took out the primary fuel filter and took it apart before presenting me with a bag of black oily, jelly like sludge. We have the dreaded fuel 'bug', a fungus that grows in water and feeds on diesel fuel, the fungus forms a colony of sticky gunk that coats all the tank surfaces and contaminates the fuel lines etc. The pic shows the inside of the tank - it should all be a shiny metallic color - not black! If you've ever had to clean out the shower trap of the soap/hair gunk you will get the picture!

The bug comes from taking on board dirty fuel contaminated with water. Unfortunately it's really hard to tell if you are doing this as the water and dirt are all dissolved in the fuel when it is being pumped at high pressure into the tank, but when the boat is sitting still it all separates out. It seems as if somewhere along our journeys we've picked up a bad batch of fuel.

We had to call in the engineers to clean the fuel tanks, they guy arrived on a barge, moored up to us and pumped away our dirty fuel -literally 100l of diesel down the proverbial drain! He then proceeded to clean the black gunk coating the tank, things were looking promising until he came to a baffle (wall welded into the tank to stop fuel sloshing around as the boat moves). He put a scope behind the wall to find bad contamination there also but was unable to access it to clean. So we are now waiting for another engineer to come on Monday morning to cut a hole in the tank and fit an inspection hatch to clean the other half out. Hopefully we will then be able to be on one our way back to Barcelona - a few euros lighter!

The crew has made good use of our time in the marina, exploring inland to Monaco, Nice and Grasse. There are lots of photos loaded on the album of their adventures - including trying multiple strange flavours of ice cream and making perfume.

Once we are underway, again we will mainly use the photo uploads to update what we are doing as the sailblogs site can be hard to update when we are on the move.

Finally in France

14 August 2017 | Anse de Cavaliere
Skipper: SE1, clear, smooth sea
We managed to finally get over to France in a weather window. Leaving NE Spain on Sunday morning, we sailed until 23:30 to reach a town called La Ciotat which has a marina and a large bay, in which we anchored.

This morning Mel and Will took he dinghy ashore to search for bread, croissants and milk. Will deployed his French knowledge to get some very tasty food and milk for the next few days.

We set sail for Cavaliere, another anchorage, which we arrived to at about 19:30. The bay has special significance for the Skipper as we had spent a couple of family summer holidays here. Also a scene of early nautical adventures on a pedalo and topper sailing dinghy. I must confess here that I told my sisters that the dark patches of weed off the beech was water so deep that the sunlight couldn't penetrate so it must be miles deep - a certain sister (who Shall remain nameless) was somewhat perturbed by this and now claims everlasting impact including a fear of seaweed! (Sorry Sarah 😘)

Tomorrow we hope to push on to Cannes as there is a firework display. We then hope to to get to Monaco by Wednesday. There is another storm forecast for the weekend so we will keep a keen eye on the forecast and plans may change accordingly!

Playa Gulloia

12 August 2017 | Playa Guilloia
Si; NNE4-5, smooth sea, sunny
On Friday we moved from Roses to Cadaqués in windy conditions again -although thankfully the sea was smooth as the wind was gusting from the land and we were hugging the coast line. It was a relatively short journey of about three hours and we picked up a mooring buoy off the very picturesque town (see photo album for pics).

After food we went ashore and found a nice creperie to round off the evening!

This morning, Mel and Si went ashore for a walk around the harbour and coast line to the next bay called Port Lligat, where Salvador Dali had his summer residence. It was a pleasant walk with a rugged coastline reminiscent of Gower; Limestone cliffs giving way to small bays and beaches with lots of rock pools.

We left our mooring in Cadaqés and headed north again as short way to our current anchorage. It's hard to believe that this is the first time we've managed to anchor this holiday. The anchorage is very picturesque, but - as a result- very busy. We expect that many of the boats will leave later this afternoon and look forward to a peaceful night. Anyway the good news is that the wind is due to die down from this afternoon and, as I write this, it seems to be doing so. We are hoping tomorrow will see us able to cross the Golfe de Lion to France!

From Puerto de Roses

09 August 2017 | Roses
Skipper
Just to bring you all up to date with our (so far) eventful trip. We sailed from our first overnight stop in St Feliu de Guixols heading as far north as we could manage. As we were about an hour and a half into our trip heading into heavy seas and strong winds on the nose of 20-25kts the engine started to die as we were passing some particularly nasty looking of-shore rocks. We turned around and unfurled the sail to head towards a safe port to affect repairs.
We arrived in Palamos and skipper spent the afternoon searching out filters for the fuel tank. The heavy seas had churned up all the sludge and debris that inevitably collect in the diesel tanks and this had started to block the filters thus restricting fuel flow to the engine. Two filters replaced and the fuel system bled ensured the engine was once again running smoothly.

Today was another windy one with some more 'interesting' seas. I reckon we had close to 3m waves as we rounded Cape Begur in 27-30kts of wind (to get a feel - stick your hand out of the car window when you are travelling at 30mph).

We had about 5 ½ hours of bashing into big waves and wind today to get to Roses - right in the NE extremity of Spain. We decided to moor in the harbour DoE to the weather conditions and forecast. We ate our dinner huddled under the cockpit tent as the wind howled and the rain poured down (just like being at home!)

Now everything has calmed down and we are at relative peace in a very sheltered harbour, although there is a big storm raging just a fed miles down the coast with 30-40kt winds.
Millie's post has clearly gone down well and I think I should delegate the writing to her as she seems to be able to write a much more interesting blog!

Monday 7th August

08 August 2017 | Palamos
Millie; very windy!!!
Hello everyone- it is your favourite Annalee crew member, Captain Millie.

Today we started our summer cruse by waking up VERY early to start our trip, (if you count 11am early- it's an hour later over here so 10 is ok I guess) and sailed in the gentle, scenic Mediterranean Sea for a short while (if you consider sailing in a 30knot wind gentle and 7 hours a short while).

It was a very, very eventful voyage that I will tell you more about now.

First Mate Mummy, and Skipper Daddy woke up quite early to prepare. Then after a while of unsuccessfully waiting for the rest of the crew, they set off. Both First Mate Mummy and Captain Millie (after she finally got up!) felt a little bit sea sick but they thought it was just because it was so hot! They thought it would just go away soon, after they regained their sea legs. However they weren't that lucky. The blowing breeze soon turned into a harsh wind. As the wind changed so did the gentle, rolling waves into large, viscous ones. Despite this, and their previously mentioned illness, Skipper Daddy still decided it was a good idea to rely solely on the sails.

Hours after this unpopular, kind of pleasant at times, decision, the weather became even worse and there was a very difficult moment involving a lot of skilful sailing. As Captain Millie was inside looking after the scared Ships Elephant Breeze, here is Ships Boy Will to describe it.

"It was scary"

Now that you got a detailed incite into what I missed let's continue.

After all of that Captain Millie thought Breeze would be ok so came back on deck and became the Chief Make-Sure-Daddy-Doesn't-Get-Wet-From-All-The-Spray-er(?). As there was ALOT of spray from the antecedently mentioned big waves, Captain Millie got very wet.

The crew finally decided to speak refuge in a nice little marina opposite the biggest motor boat ever- The Princess (we had actually seen the Princess before at a boat show ages ago). I'm guessing we (Daddy) will probably attach a photo but if not let me tell you it's big. If you are interested in renting it you could pay £191,000 per week for it. So yeah it's big. (No seriously, Google it.)

As the sky darkened, the family tucked into a delicious meal made by Skipper Daddy. Later Captain Millie and The Ships Boy Will went for a walk while First Mate Mummy slept (a good idea) and Skipper Daddy planed the rest of the voyage.

The End...

P.S Does anyone else with long hair understand the struggle of eating in the wind?
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