Tern's Travels

Pacific Seacraft 37

Vessel Name: Tern
Vessel Make/Model: Pacific Seacraft Crealock 37
Hailing Port: Falmouth UK
Crew: Larry & Manice Stabbins
20 May 2017 | Oban, Scotland, May 13-17
19 May 2017 | Gigha, off Kintyre, Scotland
09 May 2017 | Kilmore Quay, Wexford, Eire
08 May 2017 | Waterford, Eire
07 May 2017 | Waterford, Eire
30 December 2016 | Falmouth, UK
21 August 2016 | Falmouth, Cornwall, UK
14 July 2016 | Port Joinville, Ile d'Yeu, Vendee, France
12 July 2016 | Ille d'Yeu
Recent Blog Posts
20 May 2017 | Oban, Scotland, May 13-17

Oban, Scotland

The passage from Gigha to Oban goes up the Sounds of Jura and Luing and passed the notorious Corryvreckan channel, so timing the tide is vital. The wind was light E, gradually going S and we were able to leave the anchorage in the morning against the tide, catching the north going stream for the passage [...]

19 May 2017 | Gigha, off Kintyre, Scotland

Ireland to Scotland

Finally left Kilmore Quay on Wed 10th May with light SE /E predicted. Sadly it was a bit too light to sail but the tide helped and we made good progress up the Irish sea under engine, with the occasional interlude of sailing. We stopped the second night at Glenarm in N Ireland for a night's rest and to catch the tide across the North Channel to the Mull of Kintyre. Glenarm was delightful, a small but lovely marina in a stunning coastline. There was a favourable tide in the morning and by evening we were anchored in a cove on the NW corner of Gigha, a small island half way up the W coast of Kintyre The wind was a moderate Easterlie, fairly unusual, so we were lucky to be able to use this protected cove which would be exposed in anything from SW to NW. Suddenly we were in kelp territory and it took two tries to get the anchor to hold. Just as we dug it in I saw a head in the water which I thought was a seal, but after watching for a while I realised it was an otter. Latter another head appeared and we watched the pair having their evening swim/hunt session. Larry spotted some unusual-looking ducks, which we identified as eider ducks and in the morning there were two seals on the rocks at low water. It was a gorgeous place with only a farm in view. I couldn't help admiring the farms' enterprise as they were running a dairy herd as well as beef and sheep, logistically challenging, to say the least.

09 May 2017 | Kilmore Quay, Wexford, Eire

Kilmore Quay, Wexford, Eire

Kilmore Quay has proved to be a very comfortable harbour to stop in, with good protection and facilities plus endless white sand beaches. Two seals come into the harbour every afternoon to meet the fishing boats and have a bite to eat. Just came back from a 25km bus ride to visit Wexford, another ancient [...]

08 May 2017 | Waterford, Eire

Waterford

The forecast was for more strong, NE wind so we decided to stay in Waterford until the wind became more favourable for proceeding up the Irish Sea to places north. The marina is a series of pontoons along the river waterfront of the city so very convenient for all amenities. The people are notably friendly [...]

07 May 2017 | Waterford, Eire

Tern to North: 1) Falmouth to Waterford, Eire

The winter was largely devoted to Tern's maintenance and improvements; all the usual but including new standing rigging and sprayhood, repainting the mast and boom, re-varnishing the interior, extra groundtackle and some new warps etc. We relaunched in April, spent a couple of weeks moving back on board [...]

30 December 2016 | Falmouth, UK

Winter in Falmouth

Tern was hauled out at the end of October in her usual boatyard in Falmouth. We had a great time in the autumn living on board in the Falmouth area, exploring anchorages and coastal paths. We made one last trip to Dartmouth with our daughter as skipper before doing her RYA yachtmaster offshore exam [...]

Oban, Scotland

20 May 2017 | Oban, Scotland, May 13-17
Manice, gale for 2 days but some lovely sun too.
The passage from Gigha to Oban goes up the Sounds of Jura and Luing and passed the notorious Corryvreckan channel, so timing the tide is vital. The wind was light E, gradually going S and we were able to leave the anchorage in the morning against the tide, catching the north going stream for the passage through Luing Sound where the tide can be particularly strong. It was overcast, the Paps of Jura were always covered by cloud and we had to motor part of the 46NM passage but it was, nevertheless, a super day. We clocked 9 knots going passed Fladda light at the north end of Luing!
Arriving in Oban and going to the marina on Kerrera, we were greeted by the sight of Mascotte and Ellie Hughes took our lines. Mascotte, a large and beautiful Bristol Pilot Cutter, is a frequent visitor to Falmouth and Stella has twice sailed on her to Gloucester from Falmouth. A gale went through while we were there but no matter, Oban turned out to be very sociable. We had Mascotte next to us as well as friend on shore who is a legendary adventure sea kayaker, having done amongst many, the passage from the Shetland Isles to Norway! We had a great evening with him and his family.
We finally left Oban on 17th May to head for Corpach and the Caledonian Canal. However, we stopped a night at the Glencoe Boat Club at the invitation of Stella’s boyfriend’s parents and had a walk into Glencoe village, a trip down memory lane as we had spent so much time in the area in our climbing days. We really enjoyed meeting Sue and Hilary Watson and sailing into Glencoe under the Ballachullish Bridge with a mere 2-3 m clearance for the mast.

Ireland to Scotland

19 May 2017 | Gigha, off Kintyre, Scotland
Manice. SE light winds but increasing from E
Finally left Kilmore Quay on Wed 10th May with light SE /E predicted. Sadly it was a bit too light to sail but the tide helped and we made good progress up the Irish sea under engine, with the occasional interlude of sailing. We stopped the second night at Glenarm in N Ireland for a night's rest and to catch the tide across the North Channel to the Mull of Kintyre. Glenarm was delightful, a small but lovely marina in a stunning coastline. There was a favourable tide in the morning and by evening we were anchored in a cove on the NW corner of Gigha, a small island half way up the W coast of Kintyre The wind was a moderate Easterlie, fairly unusual, so we were lucky to be able to use this protected cove which would be exposed in anything from SW to NW. Suddenly we were in kelp territory and it took two tries to get the anchor to hold. Just as we dug it in I saw a head in the water which I thought was a seal, but after watching for a while I realised it was an otter. Latter another head appeared and we watched the pair having their evening swim/hunt session. Larry spotted some unusual-looking ducks, which we identified as eider ducks and in the morning there were two seals on the rocks at low water. It was a gorgeous place with only a farm in view. I couldn't help admiring the farms' enterprise as they were running a dairy herd as well as beef and sheep, logistically challenging, to say the least.

Kilmore Quay, Wexford, Eire

09 May 2017 | Kilmore Quay, Wexford, Eire
Manice. Sunny, high pressure, cold light ENE wind
Kilmore Quay has proved to be a very comfortable harbour to stop in, with good protection and facilities plus endless white sand beaches. Two seals come into the harbour every afternoon to meet the fishing boats and have a bite to eat. Just came back from a 25km bus ride to visit Wexford, another ancient port dating from Viking times. It’s quaint and more old fashioned than Waterford, but the sun was shining and we could have lunch outdoors in a café.
Tomorrow we plan to leave at dawn to catch the north bound tide in light E wind and may well ride it till we get to Scotland, we’ll see how the tides pan out but may have to stop in northern Ireland to catch a fair tide up the north channel and passed Jura, either on the west side, through the Sound of Jura, or via the east side and the Crinan Canal. Either way you end up in the Gulf of Corryvreckan, then about another 25NM to Oban. Overall over 250NM, which isn’t that far, but seems a long way from here!

Waterford

08 May 2017 | Waterford, Eire
Manice Stabbins. Predominantly NE wind, high pressure
The forecast was for more strong, NE wind so we decided to stay in Waterford until the wind became more favourable for proceeding up the Irish Sea to places north. The marina is a series of pontoons along the river waterfront of the city so very convenient for all amenities. The people are notably friendly and helpful and when we contacted Geoff Coad, a previous owner of Tern, he was very enthusiastic about paying us a visit and taking us to dinner at his home.
Waterford is the oldest city in Eire, founded by Vikings in 914AD. It has centuries of history reflected in the architecture and is very well presented with museums, churches and other cultural and heritage sites. The famous Waterford glass is now mainly made abroad and a tourist centre is all that remains of the once enormous glass factory. Nevertheless, the glass is still spectacular. We particularly enjoyed a visit to Reginald's Tower, at the apex of the "Viking Triangle", the earliest settlement, which is now a museum featuring the Viking heritage.
Geoff Coad payed us a visit and seemed to really enjoy being on Tern again and seeing what we have done to her, though he had made very useful improvements during the time he had her. The following night he took us to dinner at his home where we met his wife, the wonderful, energetic Christine who cooked up a storm, with drinks served in Waterford glass. She had also been baking and made an extra cake for us, a fat-free, tea-soaked fruit cake which we are now eating and I hope to be able to reproduce on Tern. Attached to his house, Geoff has built a massive workshop and a boatshed, so he keeps his Nicholson 32 in the shed in winter so he can work on her to his heart's content. At 80 his sailing is less ambitious than in his younger days, but he and Christine are undoubtedly an inspiring couple.
Sunday morning was overcast but we felt brave enough to motor down the river and across to Kilmore Quay, by which time the sun had come out and a light wind had sprung up, though of course, on the nose. The tides rule the Irish Sea so we are waiting here to coordinate wind and tide to sail around Carnsore Point, by Tuskar Rock, and points further north. You could say our schedule is flexible!

Tern to North: 1) Falmouth to Waterford, Eire

07 May 2017 | Waterford, Eire
Manice Stabbins. Predominantly NE wind, high pressure
The winter was largely devoted to Tern's maintenance and improvements; all the usual but including new standing rigging and sprayhood, repainting the mast and boom, re-varnishing the interior, extra groundtackle and some new warps etc. We relaunched in April, spent a couple of weeks moving back on board and doing some rig trials and waiting for the wind to come out of the north, where it had been for weeks.
Anchors away on 02/05 with light eaterlies forecast but going E/NE and increasing. The wind was too light to sail until 22.30, filling from NE but then dying again. At dawn it returned, increasing throughout the day to about 25knots, though our wind indicator had stopped working. With tide turning and wind on the nose we chose to head in, the choice being Milford Haven, 25 NM east, or Waterford, 50NM NW. Waterford won, especially as Tern had lived in Waterford for 6 years and we had been in touch with the owner, Geoff Coad, a venerable Waterford mariner, now 80 and still sailing his Nicholson 32. We made the anchorage off Little Island, a good 10NM up the River Suir, as darkness fell. A strong tide took us up river and it flows two ways round the island, meeting at the anchorage - interesting!

Winter in Falmouth

30 December 2016 | Falmouth, UK
Manice Stabbins, winter
Tern was hauled out at the end of October in her usual boatyard in Falmouth. We had a great time in the autumn living on board in the Falmouth area, exploring anchorages and coastal paths. We made one last trip to Dartmouth with our daughter as skipper before doing her RYA yachtmaster offshore exam (which she passed).
Back on land it's very cosy in our cottage, but Tern is still central to most of our days. There are all the usual winter lay up jobs. We are planning to go north next spring. Larry has been bravely recaulking some of the teak deck seams. He bought a Fein multitool, which should be useful for all sorts of jobs. One of the bigger jobs planned will be treating Tern to new standing rigging. Busy, busy, busy.
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