Lion's Paw/Murar's Dream

03 October 2017 | Bainbridge Island
12 September 2017 | Baainbridge Island
12 August 2017 | Eagle Harbor Marina
09 August 2017 | Point Roberts
08 August 2017 | Nanaimo
31 July 2017 | Ganges
26 July 2017 | Port Sidney
23 July 2017 | False Creek, Vancouver
20 July 2017 | Fasle Creek, Vancouver
18 July 2017 | Port of Sidney
14 July 2017 | Nanaimo Yacht Club
09 July 2017 | Heriot Bay Marina
05 July 2017 | Toba Wilderness Marina
29 June 2017 | Westview Marina
26 June 2017 | Decatur Island
08 June 2017 | Eagle Harbor
29 May 2017 | Port Ludlow
27 May 2017 | Oak Bay Maraina
26 May 2017 | Oak Bay Marina
24 May 2017 | Bamfield

Bainbridge Island 2

03 October 2017 | Bainbridge Island
Debra and Andy
After 20 hours of driving from Louisville to Seattle, we are now settled in our rental home on Bainbridge Island for the next seven months. We arrived on Sunday afternoon and have spent the last few days getting settled in our temporary quarters as we begin the building process of our new home. When we left for Louisville over 2 weeks ago, the contractor had completed all of the site work, and while we were away he undertook the process of preparing the lot for the foundation work which will begin tomorrow. When we first saw the hole, we were amazed just how much of the ½ acre lot will be occupied by our modest residence of about 3,000 square feet.

We have worked hard to design a home which will meet our needs for as long as we wish to live here. There are no steps between the garage and our master suite at the opposite end of the first floor. We have also included a second floor with two guest bedrooms for those who wish to come to visit and enjoy the Pacific Northwest, as well as two small offices for each of us to handle our personal needs without getting in the way of the other. What is most important is the beautiful view that we will enjoy looking our over Race Passage from Blake Island on the east to Bremerton and the naval boatyard on the west.

Those who come to visit will have the best view from the second floor, but no matter where one is inside, the full glass walls on the south side of the home will insure great views at all times. We also back up to Islandwoods, a forested parcel owned and operated by a non-profit organization which will remain in its current, forested state.

We are projecting completion of the home in the fall of 2018, and we are looking forward to finally completing what we started last summer when we first committed to make our move.

Bainbridge Island 1

12 September 2017 | Baainbridge Island
Debra and Andy
It has been a long time since our last blog since we have been primarily stationary on Lion’s Paw at her permanent home in Eagle Harbor Marina. All of our efforts since the completion of our summer cruising season is now focused on the construction of our new home here on Bainbridge Island. The construction drawings were finally submitted to the City for approval, and we were given final approval for our building permit. Our contractor, Bill Corbin, has been working with the excavating company that he has hired for our project, and it has been moving forward at a good pace. The work began with the construction of a “curtain drain” which consists of a 6 foot deep trench with a perforated pipe covered in one inch gravel to channel the off property water around the edge of our property. The soils here are very thin and do not absorb much of the moisture which begins to fall in mid-autumn and continues through mid-spring. In fact, last year set a record for rainfall here in the Seattle area with only 7 days where there was sunshine between November 1st and May 1st. If there is one thing to which we will need to become accustomed, they are the wet and overcast months which make this part of the country so green and beautiful.

Once the drain was finished, the excavators then worked on clearing the lot of trees that would otherwise block our view of Rich Passage which is what makes this lot so desirable. They also had to cut down a tall (well over 50 foot) fir tree which had died in the right of way at the front of our property. We have retained portions of it to ultimately provide firewood for the fire pit that we will have on our terrace that sits along the south of our house with the great views. One of my first projects once we move I will be to cut up and split the wood which is now in ten foot sections.

The next project was the installation of the utilities via a trench from the right of way to where they will ultimately enter the home. Once that was accomplished, the excavators put in a temporary road and driveway to our home which will accommodate the heavy trucks which will be needed to deliver materials and construction which will shortly begin with the construction of the foundation.

The last piece of site work has been the construction and installation of the septic system, as much of Bainbridge Island has no sewer system. It will not be long before we actually start the construction of the home itself.

For Labor Day weekend, we enjoyed the continued good weather which has blessed us this cruising season. We were visited by some fellow Coloradans who have decided to become Outbound owners. Their boat is under construction, and they are coming to get some advice on what they want to do with respect to that construction, as well as what to expect when they are actually cruising on her. We spent the day together going through the boat as well as a list of things that they might experience or wish to pursue, so it was a very fruitful for them.

We have spent the last week or so getting Lion’s Paw ready for the fall/winter season. Tomorrow we leave for Colorado for a couple of weeks before returning to Bainbridge Island on October 1st when we can move into the fully furnished home which we have rented through next April. We will not only get to oversee the construction, but we will get our first taste of that weather which drives some out of the area. Coming from a place where there are 300+ days of sunshine will be quite a test, but we both look forward to the challenge. At least we are in a position, should it become warranted, to take an extended vacation to a warm and sunny spot to re-charge our batteries.

Home at Last

12 August 2017 | Eagle Harbor Marina
Debra and Andy
We have returned to our home slip in Eagle Harbor Marina after a busy cruising schedule. We finished our stay in Point Roberts when we were able to find Debra's uncle at home the evening before our departure. It was a short but nice visit. We enjoyed our stay at the Point Roberts Marina but for the presents that the local flock of birds left us on our deck. It seems that they dine on blackberries when they are ripe, and their droppings definitely showed their diet, leaving stains that required scrubbing with bleach. I did what I hoped was a final cleaning the last night in the slip, and there was no sign of new droppings when we woke up. We decided to take advantage of the fuel rate for diesel in Point Roberts so we began our day's journey with a visit to the fuel dock. After taking on over 100 gallons of fuel, we were off. Debra immediately noticed a large, blackberry bird dropping on our dodger window. When I went forward to clean it. I immediately noticed the large number of farewell presents that the birds left us, so it was one more cleaning of the deck while under way.

We continued south to our next destination, James Island, where we had docked the previous season. Upon arriving at the island, we found that not only was the dock full, but the four mooring balls on the other side of this small island were also occupied. We had no choice but to choose another location, and we quickly found Spencer Spit, only a few miles away on Lopez Island where we had joined Jeff and Melody the prior season. We had a very quiet night at anchor and arose the following morning to very low cloud cover approaching ground fog. We were able to find our way out to Rosario Strait where the winds filled in nicely for some motor sailing. As we entered the Strait of Juan de Fuca, the waves built on our starboard quarter, so with the jib deployed it helped to stabilize Lion's Paw from too much side-to-side rolling.

We were barely into the Strait when we heard a Mayday call on our radio. A power boat had "hit something" and was calling the coast guard for help. He gave his location coordinates, and I began to realize that it, too, was in the same part of the Strait that we were crossing. We continued to listen, and when the owner reported water in his engine compartment and the coast guard reported that help was at least 40 minutes away, I began to try and locate his exact position. We were about 2 miles from Minor Island which is one of the few obstructions in the Strait, and I determined that was where he was located. Following the law of the sea to provide assistance whenever possible, I joined the conversation and reported that I was changing course to go to the island to provide assistance. It was fairly foggy at this point, so I did not see the island until we were about one half mile away. The charts clearly showed a shallow reef between Minor and the adjacent island to the west, and I was convinced that the boat had struck the reef. Sure enough, when we cleared the north end of Minor Island, we could see the boat aground on the reef, the tide having gone down even further since the first Mayday call.

The owner was pretty freaked out when his high water alarm went off, but I assured him that he did not have to worry about sinking because he was virtually on dry ground at that point. We remained on scene going in tight circles, and we had assured the two people on board that should they need to evacuate, we would launch our dinghy and remove them. Finally, a small coast guard boat arrived on scene, and we were given clearance to depart. It ultimately added about an hour to the day's journey, but that was a small price to pay when giving assistance to a fellow boater.

We continued south, entering Admiralty Inlet and heading into Port Townsend Bay where we continued on to the southernmost point where we had secured a slip at the Port Hadlock Marina, a sister marina to our home port. We were really hungry after this long day of travel, so we launched the electric bikes and rode into town where we found a very good Mexican restaurant. After filling the empty spots in our stomachs, we returned to the marina and called it a night.

We awoke the following morning with a set agenda. We motored back to Port Townsend in hopes of tying up to the day dock, but it was occupied, so we anchored just offshore and launched the dinghy. Today was the Saturday street market, so we walked the short distance and stocked up on some great, fresh veggies. We returned to Lion's Paw and set out on the final leg back to Eagle Harbor. The journey was basically uneventful but long. It was all motoring with winds on our nose for the entire day. We entered Eagle Harbor in the late afternoon and found our way to our home slip where we are now tied up. We couldn't wait, so we hopped in the Volvo and headed for our lot to see what progress had been made on our new home. The lot had been mowed, several of the small trees had been cleared, the beginning of our driveway had been cleared, the corners of our house had been staked, and about half of our curtain drain had been dug. We spent about an hour just walking the property, seeing where the garage, terrace, main building and master suite would lie. We were very happy with the views that will likely be available, but we may have to deal with a few of the trees and bushes along the southern property line that could obstruct those views. We are sure to hook up with our contractor on Monday to get fully up to speed.

We will be at the dock for about a week before we participate in the next yacht club cruise to Poulsbo which is only a few hours away. It is their art festival weekend, so we should have a good time.

Starting for Home

09 August 2017 | Point Roberts
Debra and Andy
After a quiet night once again alone on Lion's Paw, we set out for the U.S. promptly at 8am. The wind forecast seemed ideal for a downwind sail under spinnaker, and as we entered the Strait of Georgia, we were not disappointed. After clearing the northernmost point of Gabriola Island, we set the spinnaker and started a five hour downwind sail under ideal conditions until the winds began to die as we approached Point Roberts

I had registered Lion's Paw with the Small Vessel Registration System and filed a float plan for our journey in hopes that it would simplify our re-entry. I put all the details about the boat, persons aboard, departure and arrival locations, etc., into the website. They acknowledged activation and advised me to call in as we approached our destination, providing the float plan number which they had provided. I called in and tried to provide the number, but the agent at the other end said that they had none of the information provided, so I had to go through all the details once again over the phone. Fortunately, both Debra and I hold Nexus cards, and when we provided that information, we were promptly given our clearance into the U.S. without the need to clear at the customs dock. Once we entered the harbor at Point Roberts, it was a good thing because the customs dock was full. We had already received our slip assignment for our stay in the marina, so we found the slip and docked without any difficulty although the marina and the entry from the Strait are quite shallow. At one point when crossing the bar at the entrance behind the breakwater, we showed only 8 feet depth, only a little more than the 6.5 feet that we draw. After securing the boat, I spent the next hour or so separating the crabmeat from the crabs that I had previously caught and cooked. Not long afterwards, it was time to once again make crab cakes which we enjoyed onboard before calling it an evening.

We awoke this morning to continued haze from the BC fires. Our understanding is that this should last at least through Friday. We did launch our electric bikes and started a tour of Point Roberts which is all of 5 square miles. Our first stop was at Debra's uncle's cabin, but no one answered the door, so we went down to the south beach for a pleasant walk. We then began a bit of sightseeing with our first stop at Lily Point where we rode through the forest on well maintained trails.

At one stop, we had a great view south towards the San Juan Islands, but with the continued haze, there was nothing to see. We then proceeded along the eastern part of the peninsula to Boundary Bay where we observed the numerous, moored power boats all on the sand bar, the tide having gone down sufficiently.

We then continued along the road which lies only a matter of feet from the unmanned, unfenced Canadian border.

If Trump wanted to construct an easy wall, this would be the place! We finished the ride with lunch at a nice restaurant at the southwest tip of the peninsula. In fact, it is only one of three restaurants in Point Roberts, and two of them are closed today. We continued on to Lighthouse Point where we sat on the beach enjoying the mild temperatures and cloudless skies.

We tried one additional time to contact Debra's uncle at his cabin. This time, someone answered the door, but we were advised that he was not around today. We hope to get to see him before we leave for destinations further south tomorrow morning.

Warren Cruise

08 August 2017 | Nanaimo
Debra and Andy
The night before we left Otter Bay, we decided to set the crab trap off the transom. By morning time, we weighed anchor and brought in the crab trap. We were blessed with two large male red rock crabs, suitable for eating. I cleaned them while Debra was at the helm as we were on our way to Ganges for an evening with our friends, Bob and Brenda. We arrived, tied up to the mooring ball and I went ashore to do some laundry. Bob and Brenda finally returned from their trip to Nanaimo, and we had dinner at their condo, along with a game of all 5s dominoes with Brenda to confirm that they were following the set of rules as we know them. We decided to try our luck with a second day of crabbing and set the trap in Ganges Harbour. The following morning, Bob took me to recover the trap in his zodiac, and we were lucky again to nab a couple of large reds. Unfortunately, Bob grabbed one the wrong way, and he took quite a cut on his thumb when the crab grabbed it with his claw. Boy can they pinch hard when they are fighting for their survival!

After returning to Lion's Paw, I cleaned and cooked these crabs which made for a big enough meal of crab cakes. I added them to the first two in the refrigerator with plans to recover the meat during our long leg of our journey to Nanaimo after a short overnight stop in Montague Harbour. We began to notice in Ganges that the sky was filling with smoke which has now continued throughout this leg of this summer's adventure. There are severe wildfires burning throughout inland British Columbia, and the winds have decided to blow the smoke west to the Gulf Islands and Vancouver Island. The haze is so thick that it can be difficult to distinguish between red sunrises and sunsets. Here are two examples:


We left Montague and headed north to rendezvous with Debra's father, Warren, for his annual trip aboard Lion's Paw. We once again timed our passage through Dodd Narrows, but we were confronted through most of this leg with strong headwinds. We finally reached Nanaimo, but there were no openings to dock at the yacht club, so we anchored off of Newcastle Island within binocular sight of the dock in hopes that something would open the following day. I had successfully separated out the crabmeat, so it was crab cakes for dinner.

The next morning, we began watching the yacht club dock, and about mid-morning one of the sailboats departed, so we quickly weighed anchor and headed over where we secured Lion's Paw while awaiting the arrival of Debra's father the following evening. We had a pleasant stay at the dock, and we launched the electric bikes during our stay. We rode them along the bike path which runs along the shore of the harbour and had a delicious dinner at the bistro in the main marina. I also managed to make a couple of runs to the grocery store for some last minute supplies for Warren's visit.

Warren arrived by ferry and taxi Friday evening along with a workmate, John, who accompanied him for the long weekend.

Warren brought special gifts for Debra and me-T shirts with some interesting lettering.

We awoke Saturday morning and headed out for our first destination, Silva Bay, where we had visited last year with Warren. The winds filled in nicely so that we were able to get in a bit of sailing before entering the harbour. We docked in the same slip we had occupied last year, and Warren was right at home hoping to once again socialize with the other boats in the marina.

Unfortunately, there just weren't the numbers of boats this year as last, so I think that he was a bit disappointed. Nevertheless, we did manage to launch the dinghy and take a trip to the beach which he so enjoyed last year.

We arose on Sunday morning and set out for our next destination, Thetis Island Marina in Telegraph Harbour. The water and wind were calm, so Warren and John sat on the foredeck enjoying the journey.

We arrived at our destination and tied up to the dock. We had several admirers of Lion's Paw and talked to them about the boat. One, in particular, Patrick, was quite interesting, living in the winters in the Okanagan and the summers on Thetis Island. He told us about a car race track built in the Okanagan and designed by Jacques Villeneuve, a Canadian Formula 1 racer. It is a private club where one must buy a membership and then is able to use the track. It made me a bit nostalgic for my days owning Mountainview Motorsports Park in Colorado. We launched the dinghy and motored around to the other side of the island where there was a government dock and a beach where Warren and John were able to get in a nice swim in the cool water.

The temperatures have been mostly in the high eighties and low nineties, so any chance to cool off is welcome. However, Debra and I found the water a bit too cold for our liking, so we just enjoyed our stay at the beach.

John has First Nation blood, so he does not need a license to fish, so we decided to once again set the crab trap for the night. I awoke early Monday morning and retrieved the trap which was filled with about a dozen reds, four of which were large enough for keeping. They are now cleaned and cooked and ready for me to retrieve the meat for more crabcakes later in this journey. It is interesting that, for the most part, there simply are no longer any large Dungeness males around. It seems like the commercial fishermen have caught them so that the individual fisherman is simply out of luck. Reds are just as tasty, but they simply do not have the amount of crabmeat, being much smaller and with minimal body meat. It takes a lot of work to retrieve the meat so many cruisers simply do not want to put in the effort.

We set out from Thetis Island to time our passage once again through Dodd Narrows on our return to Nanaimo where we dropped off Warren and John for their return to Vancouver. Fortunately, there was a space available at the yacht club to drop them off and for an overnight stay before we head south as we return to the U.S. Our first stop will be Point Roberts, and the wind forecast, if it is accurate, will allow us to enjoy a pleasant, downwind sail.

Linda Cruise

31 July 2017 | Ganges
Debra and Andy
Our cruise with Linda was a great time for all. Debra met her at the ferry terminal at Swartz Bay and the two of them rode the bus back to downtown Sidney and walked the few blocks to the marina where I was anxiously awaiting their arrival. We left the dock promptly at 11am and cruised the short distance across to the Sidney Spit where we set the anchor in the area where I had anchored in the past on my own. We launched the dinghy and rode to the public dock. From there, we had a very pleasant walk out the spit.

We returned to Lion's Paw and began our competition of three way cribbage for the weekend. Debra started off with a strong showing, skunking both Linda and me in the first round and then proceeding to have back-to-back wins. We had contemplated taking the dinghy back across to downtown Sidney for the weekly, evening street market, but the winds created a little too much chop, so it was dinner aboard and an early evening.

We arose on Friday morning in hopes of grabbing one of the mooring balls at Butchart Gardens which was our ultimate destination of this weekend. We weighed anchor and journeyed for a couple of hours, managing to squeeze in a bit of sailing when the winds filled in. We arrived at Butchart Cove only to find that the mooring balls were all occupied, so we continued into Tod Inlet where there were already numerous boats at anchor. Nevertheless, we were able to find a nice anchoring spot without the need for stern tying. We continued our cribbage competition, and Debra maintained her first place position, but things tightened up a bit. We culminated the day with dinner aboard where Debra and Linda were treated to rack of lamb on the grill.

We awoke Saturday to yet another day of clear skies and pleasant temperatures. Debra has only experienced one overnight rain through her entire cruising season this year, the rest of the days filled with sunshine. Word is that this may set a record for the driest spring/summer for the Pacific Northwest. We spent the day relaxing in anticipation of our evening visit to Butchart Gardens. We continued the cribbage competition, and I managed to get in a bit of kayaking in this beautiful cove. We launched the dinghy and headed for the Garden's dinghy dock where we entered and headed for our dinner reservation at the restaurant in the Garden.

After a pleasant dinner, it was off to the amphitheater for a classic rock concert by a local band

before we headed for the culmination of the evening-the Saturday fireworks display, sitting on the lawn amongst a few thousand of our closest friends.

When it finally became dark enough, the display began with accompanying music and was easily the best fireworks display that we have experienced with both ground and aerial displays.



It was back to Lion's Paw in the pitch black of night, so with the use of a flashlight and the fact that we put our cockpit lighting on when we left earlier, we returned to Lion's Paw without incident.

Linda was scheduled to catch the noon ferry back to Vancouver on Sunday, and it was another beautiful cruise where Linda enjoyed sitting on the foredeck for most of the journey.

We timed our return to Sidney where we docked at Van Isle Marina. Debra walked Linda to the office where we had arranged for a taxi to take her to the ferry terminal. Debra returned to Lion's Paw, and we departed for our final destination of the week-Otter Bay on North Pender Island. There is a very nice marina in the bay, but we decided just to anchor offshore for the evening. We had another dinner and quiet night aboard.
Vessel Name: Lion's Paw
Vessel Make/Model: Outbound 46
Hailing Port: Boulder, Colorado
Crew: Andrew Rosen and Debra Adams
About: We have resumed our cruising efforts in the Pacific Northwest where we hope to spend the next few seasons.
Lion's Paw's Photos - Main
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Cruise to the Lau Group, Fiji
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First Stop in French Polynesia
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Heading south out of Mexico
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Rafting the Colorado River
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La Cruz to Barra de Navidad
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