Trilogy: a sailing saga in three parts

23 January 2018 | Clifton Harbour Union Island
19 January 2018 | Tobago Cays
16 January 2018 | Port Elizabeth Bequia
14 January 2018 | Young Island Cut St Vincent
12 January 2018 | Young Island Cut St Vincent
10 January 2018 | Marigot Bay St Lucia
06 January 2018 | Rodney Bay St Lucia
02 January 2018 | Rodney Bay St Lucia
01 January 2018 | Rodney Bay St Lucia
28 December 2017 | St Anne Martinique
27 December 2017 | St Anne Martinique
24 December 2017 | Fort de France Martinique
20 December 2017 | St Pierre Martinique
20 December 2017 | St Pierre Martinwue
20 December 2017 | St Pierre Martinique
16 December 2017 | Martinique
13 December 2017 | Pointe a Pitre Guadeloupe
13 December 2017
13 December 2017 | Guadeloupe
12 December 2017 | Pointe a Pitre Guadeloupe

From Beautiful Bequia to a bar on a bar

23 January 2018 | Clifton Harbour Union Island
Myra Rowling
We had a lovely stay at Bequia, enhanced by the Bequia annual music festival. It was great (Steve has promised to do a blog on it so I won’t go on) but the local and international artists were very good. If you get a chance to see, watch or listen to Shaun Munday from Missouri and Barracuda from Italy, do so. Shaun is a big guy and he belted out the lyrics and belted his guitar in a most mesmerising way. Barracuda had a beautiful voice and even included some Pavarotti. The venues of the Plantation hotel and De Reef restaurant right on the water added to the ambiance.

Monday was blowing strongly so we lingered another day in Paradise. We went to the turtle nursery. We met Brother King there, who used to be a fisherman and when he retired decided he would try to do something to help preserve the Hawkesbill turtle, many of whom he had caught in his nets. He is of Scottish descent, born and bred in Bequia and therefore has a lovely Caribbean accent. He catches hatchlings on the beach and then raises them till they are 5 years old when he releases them. He has a 30% success rate, but if he didn’t intervene, the hatchlings would have a 1 in 1000 chance of survival. He has released about 1,100 to date. He keeps ones that are injured or disabled (one was an albino and he said it wouldn’t survive, however we all know a humpback whale that has). His pet is Busybody, who is 23 years old. Brother King has an assistant called Jusrun. Jusrun told us he is one of 14, all named Jus something, and that he himself is expecting his first child in July. He will call it Goldone if it is a boy, meaning rich big man or chief. He is tall, fine and beautiful, highly intelligent and full of discontent with his lot. He said blacks cant get access to wealth and therefore all their options are limited. Our taxi driver told us that the Bequians are allowed to catch four whales a year, by traditional methods. He said they usually only catch one as it is very difficult ( I can imagine that!) but they use every bit of it. In the Whaleboner bar, we saw that the seats were made of whale vertebrae and the bar of a long whale bone.

We had a beautiful sail to Union Island, past Canouan, Tobago Cays again, and Mayreau.
Clifton Harbour is another very beautiful spot, and the photo is of a bar on the bar. It is called Janti’s Happy Island. Janti collected up conch shells from conch middens in the waters around the islands ( like we saw at Anagarda last year) and used them to build an island, and then built a bar on it. How clever!
Myra Rowling

Lobster and music - how good does it get

19 January 2018 | Tobago Cays
Myra Rowling
We had a great sail down and back to Tobago Cays. The idea was to attend the evening lobster beach BBQ held every night on these uninhabited islands. We arrived and booked in with Mr Best, the man in the dinghy, however when he came to collect us it was blowing and drizzling. In the end we had delicious barbecued lobsters and Creole accompaniments delivered to our boat. Talk about Uber Eats! It certainly was the best lobster I have eaten.

Back to Bequia for the annual Bequia four day music festival which we have been lucky enough to stumble across. The festival started as a Blues festival in nearby Mustique, but has been coming to Bequia for 15 years as well. (There is photo in the pilot guide of Mick Jagger performing at one such festival in Mustique.) We started Thursday night with the Elite Steel Band in the sand-floored Frangipani Bar. There are 4 women and 9 men in the band, and the big advantage of steel bands, we discovered watching it, is that the musicians can dance as well as play. There was a good crowd consisting mainly of older tourists and yachties with removed inhibitions. It is a great sound and great entertainment. At one stage one of the musician’s little boys danced around amongst the many steel drums. As his head only came up to the top of the drums, I imagine his hearing was slightly affected in the time it took for his mum and dad to remove him.

And Steve won two hearts at dinner. The restaurant’s two cats, after begging tuna from me, sat on Steve’s lap purring.

Beautiful Bequia

16 January 2018 | Port Elizabeth Bequia
Myra Rowling
A short sail, with a downpour, to beautiful Bequia. Bequia is the epitome of a tropical island, with golden beaches, emerald green foliage, and lots of dinghy docks, restaurants and bars. We anchored near Port Elizabeth, the little capital, and walked along the curve of Admiralty Bay. It was a lovely walk, including along the Princess Margaret Trail and lunch at Princess Margaret beach. In 1958 the princess swam there and it was promptly renamed after her. Lots of English visitors were copying her and revelling in the sun, sand and sea. A swim back on the boat and then dinner - on the first night at Frangipani and the second at the Fig Tree. John practised by having lobster, as we planned to sail the next day to Tobago Cays and go to a lobster BBQ on the beach.

The other good thing about Bequia is that the sun showers have gone.

Enjoying St Vincent

14 January 2018 | Young Island Cut St Vincent
Myra Rowling
St Vincent has a slightly threatening air to paradise. Its history could explain it. In 1675 the local Caribs found a Dutch boatload of African slaves wrecked on their island. They welcomed them and intermarried, their progeny being called the Black Caribs. Trouble eventually developed and the Black Caribs took over the island from the original Caribs and then fought against British settlement. They supported the French side during the 18th century, but when the French ceded the island to Britain under the Treaty of Versailles (of 1783, not 1919) they continued to fight the British in what were called the Carib Wars. They were defeated in 1797 and most were deported to Honduras. The British finally gave them independence in 1979. Not the sort of history that would make you happy.

There is only one complaint about these beautiful Caribbean islands - it rains every day. Not heavy enough to spoil activities, but heavy enough to mean we open and close the hatches many times day and night. We thought it would stop as we moved away from the wet season, but in St Lucia and St Vincent it seems to have increased. The bright side is lots of rainbows.

John and Steve climbed the island called Fort Duvernette, near our mooring spot. The British soldiers manage to get cannon up its precipitous cliffs and then placed them pointing out to sea, aimed against the French, and inland against the Black Caribs.

We had a lovely sundowner on Young Island at the resort, then repaired in more rain to dinner on board.

To St Vincent and the Grenadines with Steve

12 January 2018 | Young Island Cut St Vincent
Myra Rowling
We had a great sail to St Vincent. We left about 7am and arrived in the Young Island
Cut and the Blue Lagoon about 3pm. The Fates turned on a perfect day for Steve’s first sail. The sky and water were blue, flying fish were everywhere, St Lucia and St Vincent provided lovely views as we sailed by, and Trilogy enjoyed the reach, with Steve getting her up to 10.5 knots. And importantly for me, the water was relatively calm, so I arrived feeling hale, hearty and hungry,

The mooring is an attractive beach side spot, again with surrounding restaurants that you can dinghy up to (but it would be impossible to beat Marigot Bay). According to the pilot, security is an issue so we will have to be watchful, especially as Trilogy is within swimming distance of the beach. Off to the French Verandah for dinner.

What a find!

10 January 2018 | Marigot Bay St Lucia
Myra Rowling
Marigot Bay is the prettiest of spots- naturally attractive, and a very attractive luxury development as well. We saw it from the hill behind on our road tour, and thought we must come - good decision. All the restaurants are waterside with dinghy docks (one is called Doolittle’s as Dr Doolittle was filmed here). The marina is a luxury hotel, with a waterfall swimming pool, spa, restaurants, bars. As the photo shows, you dinghy right up to it, or you can dock your boat at it. The rich and famous come here for a break in the luxury rooms after they tire of their luxury yachts. However, it is hard to beat our free anchoring spot for beauty.

After sampling three of the restaurants, we were joined by a jet lagged Steve who came via LA and San Fran. Now to head out on the last part of our Caribbean adventure.
Vessel Name: Trilogy
Vessel Make/Model: Beneteau Oceanis 54
Hailing Port: Sydney, Australia
Crew: Garth & Ros Brice; John & Myra Rowling; Steven Ring
About: The crew all live in Canberra, Australia and have raced and cruised together in the Canberra Ocean Racing Club.
Extra: Trilogy cruised through the Mediterranean for four seasons before crossing the Atlantic with the ARC to the Caribbean. Following three seasons in the Caribbean the intention is to sail back across the Atlantic in 2018 and continue cruising in the Med.
Trilogy's Photos - South to Didyma
Photos 1 to 4 of 4 | Main
1
Kat and Jack
Sunset near St Paul
Jack
French cruise liner
 
1