01 March 2017 | Cayo del Rosario, Cuba
24 February 2017
20 February 2017
30 January 2017 | Isla Beata, Southern Tip of Dominican Republic
27 January 2017 | Barahona, DR
23 January 2017 | Las Salinas
21 January 2017 | Las Salinas
27 December 2016 | Esperanza, Isla De Vieques, Porto Rico
31 October 2016 | Portsmouth VA
10 August 2016
03 August 2016
24 July 2016 | Baddeck, The Bras D'Or, Cape Breton
20 July 2016 | St Peter's Canal, Brad D'Or
18 July 2016 | Fishermans Harbour, County Harbour, Eastern Shore, NS
16 July 2016
13 July 2016 | Halifax Waterfront
12 July 2016
10 July 2016 | Halifax
07 July 2016
29 June 2016 | Gold River, Mahone Bay

Cuba. Sailing Day 14!

01 March 2017 | Cayo del Rosario, Cuba
Barrie
Cuba is a big country. We're just over the half way stage of our cruise round the south coast of Cuba. Its all quite challenging but at least the wind is behind us. The anchorages are pretty amazing. More to add as soon as we have internet.

A week in Cienfugos

24 February 2017
Life here is interesting but frustrating. The shops have eggs one day, potatoes another, and I can't find any crisps or peanuts! The shop interiors are like Britain in the '50s. We gather our wits in a café on the square, entertained by this excellent group of musicians. The garage on the walk back to the marina is the best source of beer. But everyone is friendly, and a lot more patient than we are. It's been a choppy two days in the anchorage due to westerly winds, but tomorrow the Trades set back in, so we are heading out to the cays again.

Trinidad by Chevrolet

20 February 2017
Internet is new to Cuba, so no posts for a while! After two lonely weeks in the Beautiful Cays of the Jardín de la Reine, Yarona is anchored off the marina in Cienfuegos and we have come to Trinidad for the day in a Chevy that's older than us! We passed more horse-drawn buggies than cars on the way here. The town is fascinating and we are looking forward to lunch in a paladar. Cubans are allowed to have small private businesses now, to everyone's advantage.

HAM Radio Camp gives Isla Beata a Boost!

30 January 2017 | Isla Beata, Southern Tip of Dominican Republic
Barrie
This is supposed to be very isolated, with a few fisherman spending a month at a time here, and a manned coastguard station. But as we were setting the anchor last night, a voice came over on the VHF. There is a Ham Radio camp here, 15 guys from the mainland establishing the first connection for 28 years, just staying a week. They run three HAM radio stations round the clock, and enthusiasts make contact from around the world, to 'collect' the island. 8,000 calls logged so far and counting! They are also doing community service, leaving behind some solar panels and organising a beach cleanup. We know this because we were invited ashore for dinner- very simple, grilled fish and plantain. Not the evening we were expecting!

Photo to follow when we have internet.

A morning at the market

27 January 2017 | Barahona, DR
We are anchored in a small basin at Barahona, our last town in the DR before Cuba. We know shopping in Cuba will be restricted to whatever is left over after the farmers have handed most of their crop over to the government to be issued back as weekly rations, so it was time for a big fruit and veg shop. We also know there is a large market here, so this morning we took the dinghy over to the town commercial wharf loaded with shopping bags, money safely zipped away. The first challenge was climbing out of the dinghy, using an old black tyre we assume had been suspended for just this purpose. The market was huge, crowded and filthy. We resisted the meat stalls, where everything was hacked up on a bloody board and covered in flies, avoided being run over by motorbikes loaded with bananas, and tackled the fruit and veg avenue. About six stalls later, we ended up with this lovely haul, shown drying in the cockpit.

For the first time ever, I have washed everything in bleach solution. At least it will keep well, being local and never having seen a fridge until today. There are no air-miles here.Total cost- about $10.

Salty Salinas

23 January 2017 | Las Salinas
There isn't much to do here- one hotel that has certainly seen better days and a few dusty streets. The most interesting things are the salt pans which are photogenic and still operating. We arrived to find two other yachts in the bay but both only stayed a day, so we have been on our own here for four nights now.
The job list is going down, including fixing a small mystery leak we have had for a while and a repair to the jib. The water here is lovely and clear, so we can run the watermaker and keep the tanks full, with plenty to spare for showers after a swim and to run the washing machine.

At last we have good internet to keep us amused, as one success in Boca Chica was buying a Claro data sim which is working well on board.

The Dominican Republic - A country of contrasts

21 January 2017 | Las Salinas
Kath - Sunny and warm with a light breeze
The Dominican Republic is known for it's vast all-inclusive resorts- but they are a long way from our route in both distance and experience! I knew from my research this was not going to be an easy country to visit by yacht, and so it has proven to be. Its the norm for officials here to supplement their very low salary by expecting a significant 'propina' (read tip, or bribe) for every service. We checked into Marina Zar Par at Boca Chica on the south coast. The official fees for entry add up to about $120, but the marina has done a deal with immigration to charge every boat arriving a flat fee of $250, to include everyone's little extra. Despite this, we still had three officials in the cabin with their heavy boots on within an hour of our arrival, and suffered the routine intrusive but pointless search. We are now only allowed to travel from one named port to another, with a new 'dispacho' for every journey. Lovely anchorages on route are off limits for overnight stops, and as you have to leave within an hour of getting your dispacho its almost impossible to complete each passage in daylight. When we arrived here yesterday the coastguard was alongside demanding our paperwork before we had even set the anchor. They need a bit of customer service training!
But rant over, here we are at anchor in Las Salinas, a beautiful sheltered spot where we are planning to spend a few days, chill, and get stuck into the jobs list. Having paid up, we may as well stay a while!

Off the Beaten Track!

27 December 2016 | Esperanza, Isla De Vieques, Porto Rico
Barrie
We've enjoyed a month in the British and US Virgin Islands, but the time has come for us to start our journey west to Cuba. We've said goodbye to our friends Tom and Susan, met on the rally, who are heading south down the island chain. Yarona is on a mooring in Esperanza Bay on the south coast of Vieques, one of the Spanish Virgin Islands and part of Puerto Rico. This is a lively place with a hippy vibe. The photo is of Sun Bay, round the corner from our mooring, and a perfect Caribbean Beach with clear blue surf lapping onto golden sand.

ARC Caribbean 1500

31 October 2016 | Portsmouth VA
Barrie
We are heading south for the winter with the Caribbean 1500 rally, next stop the BVIs. At some point over the next couple of weeks we will be swapping fleeces for shorts, and packing the duvets away. Our good friend Kate has joined us, so life should be easier than on our Atlantic Crossing.

Liscombe Lodge

10 August 2016
Photo to follow....

Liscombe Lodge is a hotel owned by the Province, and is in a beautiful spot six miles up the river. There is water and electric at the dock, and the $40 fee includes use of all the facilities, including the kayaks and indoor pool. The hot-tub was very welcome after yesterday's 40 mile cycle ride to Sherbrooke Village Museum, a restoration of what was a bustling lumber and shipbuilding town in 1880.
It's harldy Center Parcs here, and the museum is definitely not the same league as Beamish, but it's still been a very pleasant stop.

The Cabot Trail

03 August 2016
Jack has hired a car, and the four of us spent today on a long drive around the 300km Cabot Trail. This is a Nova Scotia "must do", and sweeps around the Cape Breton Highlands with spectacular views. We found time for a two hour walk along the Skyline Trail, where it's quite common to see moose, but we were out of luck.

An easy Week in Baddeck

24 July 2016 | Baddeck, The Bras D'Or, Cape Breton
Where is everyone? It's hard to believe this is high season. Our first night on leaving St Peters was spent at anchor in a harbour a mile wide, which we shared with just two other yachts. We are now in Baddeck, the main town in the Bras D'Or, famous as the home of Alexander Graham Bell. We have taken one of the dozen mooring buoys provided by the marina and plan to spend a while here. This cute lighthouse is on the island across from the town, giving us good shelter. Baddeck is small but has everything we need. The town is proud of it's Celtic heritage, but we have had enough of the bagpipe player on the end of the pier! The water is only half as salty as the ocean, and warm enough for a daily swim. A steady trickle of yachts come and go, of all nationalities, many on their way to Newfoundland.

Entering the Bras D'Or

20 July 2016 | St Peter's Canal, Brad D'Or
St Peter's Canal connects the Bras D'Or Lakes to the Atlantic, and is National Historic Site. It is calm and beautiful now, but has had a long and disruptive history. The area had long been known to the M'kmaq people, who carried their canoes over the isthmus. In 1630 French merchants arrived and built a small fort, lead by Nicholas Denys who traded furs peacefully with the Indians.He built a log roll-over road so bigger boats could be dragged across. A town developed as a major trading centre, but the fort and settlement were destroyed by the British in 1758. The British did not treat the M'kmaq well. However, the settlement and volume of shipping grew and in 1854, work on the canal began. It took 15 years.
Now only pleasure boats pass through, and locks control the 1.4 meter tidal drop.

Sailing in Company

18 July 2016 | Fishermans Harbour, County Harbour, Eastern Shore, NS
In 2013 we were anchored off an island in Croatia when Windleblo sailed in. This was how we first met Jack and Jocelyn, on Yarona's baby sister, a Hallberg Rassy 40. They had bought her three years previously in Sweden and were sailing her back to the US. Last year our paths crossed again in Camden, Maine. Windleblo spent the winter in Maine, but with an earlier start they have caught us up and we are spending a few days sailing north east together, along with their friend Karolina.
The Eastern Shore of Nova Scotia is a very empty and lonely place, and we are glad of the company. We have three days sailing of about 50 miles each to reach Cape Breton. For two days we have not seen another yacht. And this is a fine weekend in July! The photo shows them about to anchor in County Harbour. Although it is a lonely shore, we are are spoilt for a choice of sheltered anchorages.

Heading North at Last

16 July 2016
At last, we are on our way to Cape Breton and the Bras D'or Lakes. This is our first night at anchor, tucked behind an island in Halifax Harbour; hard to believe it can be so peaceful only three miles from Downtown. yesterday Karolina and I visited Pier 21, the excellent Museum of Immigration. Several million people have arrived in this harbour in their quest for a better life.

Bishop's Landing

13 July 2016 | Halifax Waterfront
By good luck rather than planning, we are here for Halifax Jazz Festival. Oddly, most of the main acts are anything but Jazz. Tonight we are off to church to see Julia Holter who 'wanders the luminal space between the conscious and the subconscious...'. Despite this, the Guardian gave her last album a 5* review, so here's hoping for a good evening. On a more prosaic note, we have had a big spend at Pete's Fine Foods- good cheese! Chorizo and pancetta! Frank Coopers Marmalade! The cupboards are well stocked before we head for Cape Breton, and the wind looks good and settled from Friday.

Northwest Arm, Halifax

12 July 2016
The Squadron is tucked up a fork in the harbour, and has an active junior development programme. Today is a much better day, and the kids were all out having fun in the dinghies. We are about to motor round to the main city waterfront, where a few floating pontoons have recently been introduced alongside the old wharves to attract visiting yachts. The price is very reasonable for a city centre berth.
Update on the St Pierre race- of the sixteen boats that started, four turned back, one dismasted. Not a good year.

The Halifax to St Pierre Race

10 July 2016 | Halifax
It's time for a big city experience. The weather is awful; cold, grey and wet. Yesterday we left Prospect Cove and motored most of the way to Halifax. The wind was on the nose along the coast, and we just couldn't be bothered to short tack.
We are staying on a mooring at the oldest yacht club in N America, the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron. The 'Sqadron', as it is called locally, hosts a biennial race to the French island of St Pierre. We watched the start from the city Riverside boardwalk, and one of these three Open 60s will certainly be the first to finish. They are in for a rough two days.
The people of Nova Scotia are incredibly friendly and helpful, no less so here in the city. 'The folks here- the're the best!' For some reason, they are known as 'Blue Noses'.
Tomorrow, the Mall beckons, and a huge provisioning shop before we continue east.
We are moored next to another British yacht, quite a rarity round here, and are looking forward to swapping tales with Nerys and Rob over a drink this evening.

Prospect Cove

07 July 2016
We are having a few days on a mooring buoy in this very sheltered cove four miles in from the ocean. This was kindly offered to us by a fellow OCC member, and gives us chance to relax at last and give Yarona a good clean and tidy. There is a small grocery store but nothing else ashore, but we have launched the bikes for the first time this year and cycled back to the small village of Prospect on the rocky shore. No cafe, alas! We are also having an enforced digital detox, and a break from the political chaos back in the UK.

Slow Progress

29 June 2016 | Gold River, Mahone Bay
We are still here in Gold River. We have boatyard fever, not cabin fever. The latest delay has been due to Barrie's battle with the gearbox on the mast that furls the mainsail. After baking some parts in the oven and freezing others in the marina's icebox, it all went back together today. We hope to be off at last later tomorrow for a short sail to a quiet anchorage at the entrance to this bay. Plenty of boats have been launched in the last few days, including this beauty.
Vessel Name: Yarona
Vessel Make/Model: Hallberg Rassy, HR43
Hailing Port: Lancaster, UK
Crew: Barrie and Kath Stott
About:
We came late to sailing in 2001, first on flotilla holidays then on various courses and "mile builders". By 2008 we had a plan, blew caution to the wind, downsized our home and sold our business. We bought Yarona and lived on board for six months each year, sailing in Scotland and then the Med. [...]
Extra: Yarona was launched in 2003. She had already done a circumnavigation when we bought her. We believe her to be the perfect yacht for a live-aboard couple. She is safe at sea and comfortable at anchor. She is our first boat, and probably our last!
Yarona's Photos - Main
test test
No Photos
Created 19 April 2015
11 Photos
Created 15 October 2014
The Adriatic: Croatia and Italy
18 Photos
Created 12 October 2013