A Boat Too Far

In 2005 we bought a 46' catamaran in Thailand as a wreck. We removed the cabin, bridgedeck, main crossbeam and all the bulkheads then completely redisigned and rebuilt her in Phuket over the course of 5 years. It seemed like a good idea at the time..

09 January 2019
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05 January 2019
02 January 2019
17 December 2018
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30 November 2018
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12 November 2018
03 November 2018

Paradise ?

05 December 2019
Annette
Yes we are in another really cool little hidy hole, with glaciers, snow capped mountains and waterfalls but it's not always paradise. Right now we are riding out 45 knot williwaws, strong enough to kick up clouds of spray from the bay around us and to vaporize the smaller waterfalls tumbling down the granite walls, leaving them momentarily dry until the wind dies and they fill in again. Rum Doxy meanwhile bucking and straining on the reins that bind her safely to the trees, while hail beats on the cabin top like shattering safety glass.
But, in between the extreme weather, we go on an expedition. We put on all our warm cloths and then our “dry suits”, launch the kayak, peddle across the bay in a freezing rain and climb to the top of a moss soaked ridge. From the top of the ridge we can see across the channel to the peaks and glaciers on Isla Gordon. Then turning to the right we see the glacier that lies directly in front of Rum Doxy where we live, a huge expanse of thick blue ice from which waterfalls slide down the granite face. Continuing around we see another, larger cascading glacier stepping it's way down to a gravelly moraine which is surrounded by low lying granite domes covered with orange and green moss. Then to our immediate right is a third, impossibly steep, free falling glacier, ending in its own lake. We suddenly hear a deep rumble and watch as an avalanche of ice falls to the lake below. From the lake a river runs to the salt water bay, but not before the beavers dam it up causing the marshy death of the forest that was there before the beavers were introduced. Architecturally crafted wood stick dams creating black water ponds, each with a mounded mud hut off to the side. A Watership Down.

Seno Pia, Canal Beagle, Tierra del Fuego

30 November 2019
Annette
I'm sitting in my bean bag chair looking forward out our picture windows gazing up on a frozen river cascading from the belly's of majestic spires sculpted in ice. Mike is sitting in his beanbag watching Lord of the Rings as if he was actually here in middle earth. And I wonder how to describe what it's like to live on a sailboat now anchored in front of a glacier, down in the Beagle canal, Chile. The magnitude of this pristine, raw, wilderness is all consuming and a reminder of the power of nature and our place in it. We are here to observe and experience with all our senses at all times. It is exactly the things that make being here hard which make this place so irresistible and rewarding. A harsh climate, isolation. Natural wonders beyond imagination. Living a dream. Left to your own devices. Photos can not relay the energy that is so heightened when you are living on your sailboat in the Beagle channel.

Seno Pia, Canal Beagle, Tierra del Fuego

29 November 2019
Annette
I'm sitting in my bean bag chair, looking forward through our picture windows, gazing up on a frozen river cascading down from the bellies of majestic spires covered in ice. Mike is sitting in his bean bag watching the Lord of the rings as if he were actually in Middle Earth, and I wonder how to describe what it's like to live on a sailboat anchored in front of a glacier, here in the Beagle Canal, Chile. The magnitude of this raw, pristine wilderness is all consuming and a reminder of the powers of nature and our place in it. We are here to observe and experience with all our senses at all times. It is exactly the things that make being here hard that make this place so irresistible and rewarding. A harsh climate, isolation and natural wonders beyond imagination. Living a dream and left completely to you own devices. Photos cannot relay the energy that is so heightened while sailing on the Avenue of Glaciers.
Annette

(The weather sucks, but it's really pretty. Mike)

Sent from Iridium Mail & Web.

Sent from Iridium Mail & Web.
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<pre class="k9mail">[s]<br />[c1]p:54 47.79's:69 37.76'w<br />[t]Seno Pia, Canal Beagle, Tierra del Fuego<br />[a]Annette<br />[b]I'm sitting in my bean bag chair, looking forward through our picture windows, gazing up on a frozen river cascading down from the bellies of majestic spires covered in ice. Mike is sitting in his bean bag watching the Lord of the rings as if he were actually in Middle Earth, and I wonder how to describe what it's like to live on a sailboat anchored in front of a glacier, here in the Beagle Canal, Chile. The magnitude of this raw, pristine wilderness is all consuming and a reminder of the powers of nature and our place in it. We are here to observe and experience with all our senses at all times. It is exactly the things that make being here hard that make this place so irresistible and rewarding. A harsh climate, isolation and natural wonders beyond imagination. Living a dream and left completely to you own devices. Photos cannot relay the energy
that is
so heightened while sailing on the Avenue of Glaciers. <br />Annette<br /><br />(The weather sucks, but it's really pretty. Mike)<br /><br />Sent from Iridium Mail &amp; Web.<br /><br />Sent from Iridium Mail &amp; Web.</pre>
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Caleta Brecknock

24 November 2019
Mike
We have just spent 3 days tied up in Caleta Brecknock on the far Western tip of Tierra del Fuego. This is a small bay surrounded by 2000 foot granite domes that have been scoured smooth by ice and wind, and dotted with lakes, tarns and waterfalls. There are stunted trees growing in the crevices but wherever a leaf or twig pokes up from the protection of the rock it is sheared off by the wind. There are a few that try to make a go of it in the open, but they are blown along the ground so that a tree may be 12 feet long but never gain a height of over 6 inches, and ending in a tuft of tiny leaves.

We did have a little exitement when a storm passed close by, bringing gusts of over 30 knots into our anchorage. This is normally no concern, but when your stern is only feet from the rocks it adds interest. In addition to our anchor we had half a dozen lines tied to the shore so we did not budge, but we were happy enough when the wind switched and we could get back to napping. On the bright side, the wind brought dry weather and we were able to air out a bit and trim some of the mold growing in the cabin.
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<pre class="k9mail">[s]<br />[c1]p:<br />[t]Caleta Brecknock<br />[a]Mike<br />[b]We have just spent 3 days tied up in Caleta Brecknock on the far Western tip of Tierra del Fuego. This is a small bay surrounded by 2000 foot granite domes that have been scoured smooth by ice and wind, and dotted with lakes, tarns and waterfalls. There are stunted trees growing in the crevices but wherever a leaf or twig pokes up from the protection of the rock it is sheared off by the wind. There are a few that try to make a go of it in the open, but they are blown along the ground so that a tree may be 12 feet long but never gain a height of over 6 inches, and ending in a tuft of tiny leaves.<br /><br />We did have a little exitement when a storm passed close by, bringing gusts of over 30 knots into our anchorage. This is normally no concern, but when your stern is only feet from the rocks it adds interest. In addition to our anchor we had half a dozen lines tied to the shore so we did not bu
dge,
but we were happy enough when the wind switched and we could get back to napping. On the bright side, the wind brought dry weather and we were able to air out a bit and trim some of the mold growing in the cabin. </pre>
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Bahia Fortescue

19 November 2019
Annette
We are anchored here in Caleta Gallant, in the Straights of Magellan, 28 miles from the most southern point of the continental America’s. But, looking around, surrounded by alpine peaks covered in snow, we could easily be anchored in Lake Geneva. As we sail down this infamous straight, whether to port or to starboard, whenever there is a break in the clouds you can see ice fields and glaciers.
Since we left Valdivia 6 weeks ago our passage down has been fast and (relatively) easy. The reasons being we've had the wind and current behind us, like a magic carpet, the whole way down. The prevailing winds and current come from the North and West, and since we are traveling Southeast, we've been enjoying this free ride, but emotionally and strategically we are preparing ourselves for the dreaded slog back up against all these obstacles.
You can’t help thinking about the first circumnavigators and imagining how in the heck they even made it through here? For one reason every island, canal and mountain is named after these explorers and their surviving crew. Also, to think a little less than 500 hundred years ago when they began their first attempts at navigating through here, they didn't have charts, gps, motors, weather reports, warm clothing, food, radio, heaters.....sailors chose a life at sea because conditions were worse at home. How they must have suffered!
Which, again, makes me a princess. Not only do I have the luxury of all the things mentioned above, but every night I sit at the best table in the restaurant, with a spectacular view that rotates for my pleasure, eating fresh and delicious food, then crawl under my heated (hot water bottles are awesome!) flannel sheets and down comforter and sleep like a rock!

Puerto Profundo

16 November 2019
Mike
Once again we are tucked away, waiting out the weather. We are paying special attention this time around as we are getting ready to head into the Straights of Magellan, which, due to its size and NW orientation, can focus the wind and become particularly snotty. We are fortunate in that there is a lighthouse nearby that broadcasts the conditions twice daily and will relay the forecast if asked. It has been raining steadily for the past day, but in the brief moments between chubascos we can catch glimpses of the ice fields and mountains across the sound. We are backed into a slot in a small island with mooring lines ashore. The rock walls are no more than 30 feet away on either side with what look like giant bonsai sprouting from their tops and sides, reminding us of the temple gardens we saw in Japan. While the wind indicator at the top of the mast reads 25 knots, it is calm at deck level and we are perfectly snug in our little caleta, waiting for a series of fronts to pass so we can sneak down the Straights. We were planning on exploring in the kayak today, but, between the wind and the rain and the cold, it is looking like a better day to brew a batch of our Patagonia IPA instead.

Speaking of cold, when we arrive in a new anchorage we are usually visited by a small hawk called the chimango. These guys are very curious and will spend hours walking around the boat, checking things out, before crapping on the deck and flying off. The other day, one discovered that there was warm air coming out of the smokestack for our heater and settled in. Sweet! It wasn't long, though, before he jumped up and started picking up his feet, one after the other, and looking at them with indignation, wondering why they were so hot while the rest of him was enjoying the draft. He would do this dance for a while, then jump off to continue his inspection of the boat, only to return a few minutes later to repeat the process. Down here, with no TV, no internet and out of contact with the rest of the world, we take our entertainment where we can find it.
Vessel Name: Rum Doxy
Vessel Make/Model: 46' Custom Catamaran
Hailing Port: Santa Barbara, California
Crew: Mike Reed, Annette Reed
Extra: A "rum doxy" is 18th century pirate-speak for a woman of remarkable character and ambiguous virtue
Rum Doxy 's Photos - Philippines
Photos 1 to 60 of 60 | Main
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Sunset, anchored as some islands just offshore of Kota Kinabalu, the capital of Sabah.
Gunung Kinabalu, at just under 14,000 feet, dominates the skyline around Kota Kinabalu.
A submarine surfaced in front of us as we headed north again.
G. Kinabalu from the north.
Hopefully our last haulout in SE Asia. They don
An all too familiar sight but this one was just a quick bottom job and a couple of odds and ends.
We have a keel cooler for our refrigeration which requires the boat to be in the water to work. When we hauled out this posed a problem but we solved it by rigging up a water-bath fed by a siphon with a slow drip. Cold beer on the hardstand.
We launched and continued north to the Phillipines. After a week of moving north we did a couple of overnighters, arriving in Baquit Bay, El nido late one night. When we awoke in the morning we found that we had anchored next to our friends from Miri, Roger and Jane aboard "Wings and Strings". We have spent the last couple of weeks buddy-boating with them around the Busuangas.
Dinner on the beach at El Nido. This is a small tourist town with a "backpacker" feel. Lots of Filipino tourists as well since this is holy week and a major holiday in the Philippines.
Sunset on the lanai.
The beach at Corong Corong, El Nido.
Happy hour.
We took a tour around Baquit Bay on a banka run by a fellow we met on the beach, Rual. We had a great trip and got to see a lot of the area that we wouldn
Annette with Capt. Rual.
Jane and Roger.
Lots of limestone peaks and pinnacles like Thailand, only much cleaner water and much less trash.
Lunch on the beach. Rual made a rum flambet fruit dessert. After we went snorkling we saw that Rual had polished off the rest of the rum bottle rather than let it get stale. He was very cheerful for the rest of the trip and was untroubled by adversity, even when the engine wouldn
Art.
Every country seems to have it
Perched in the pinnacles.
The view at anchor in Corong Corong.
Stealth banka in Corong Corong.
Sunrise in El Nido
The view from the hammock.
Sunset over Lagen Island, Bacuit Bay, El Nido.
Helicopter Island.
El Nido.
We left El Nido and slowly moved north. Another day in N. Palawan.
Downtown Coron.
We went on a tour of Coron Is. Again, rather than take our own boats as there is a lot of shallow coral we went on a banka. The banka we hired had no starter, but who needs one when you have a rope and a handful of willing backs.
Someone has to point the way.
Villa rides again.
Annette and Jane.
The bold and well-insured.
Kayangan lake on Coron Is. This is a brackish lake with crystal clear water.
Not sure what the penalty for "looking around" is, but we kept our eyes on the ground just to be safe.
 
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