Aisling I

18 July 2016 | Genoa
11 July 2016 | Genoa Italy
04 July 2016 | Genoa
02 July 2016 | Genoa
25 June 2016 | Porto Azzurro Elba
11 April 2016 | Marina di Ragusa
14 January 2016
25 September 2015 | Crotone Italy
18 September 2015 | Erikoussa
10 September 2015 | Preveza
10 September 2015 | Preveza
24 July 2015 | Preveza
13 July 2015 | Vlicho Bay
03 July 2015 | Preveza Greece
21 June 2015

Corfu: Castles, Choirs and Clothing by the Kilo!

30 September 2015
Bonnie
Anchoring underneath a castle always brings a certain sense of awe. This is something that we definitely can't do in Nova Scotia, unless you count the one in Southwest Cove, which isn't a real castle even though it looks pretty cool. So, as we drop our anchor in Garitsa Bay underneath Corfu's Old Fortress, we are feeling very happy to have arrived in such an historic place. Perhaps the skipper of the large powerboat that is hard aground aft of our port side got distracted by the view. But a more likely explanation is that his anchor dragged in last week's blow, so we make sure that our trusty Spade has dug in well before launching the dinghy to do a bit of exploring. We'd anchored under castles before, but this is the first time we've ever driven our dinghy through a moat.



The manager at Mandraki marina kindly lets us park our dinghy in a corner of their dock; then we have an interesting walk through the fortress to get to the town. We just hope we'll be able to get back through the gate when we need to go home.

I'd expected Corfu town to be full of British tourists and pubs selling Guinness and full English breakfasts. In fact, things are pretty quiet as we emerge from the ramparts of the castle and walk down the Liston, the main promenade of Corfu town. Corfu (known in Greek as Kerkyra) was controlled by Venice for over 400 years, between 1386 and 1797. Thanks to the strong Venetian fortifications that surround the old town, Corfu was never under Ottoman rule as most of Greece was. Corfu's Venetian past is evident in the Italianate architecture, and even the name "Liston" harks back to the Venetians, since it is the Venetian term for a marble slabs used to pave squares or avenues. A cricket game is just finishing up on the pitch beside the Liston, perhaps a legacy of the 50 years during the 19th century when Corfu was a British protectorate. We might have watched a bit of the game, if only we'd known the rules. Inside the town, the streets are quiet and most of the shops are shuttered. We've done it again: arrived in a new place on a Sunday afternoon. We've also arrived without our cameras. Correction: I have forgotten my camera. Rick has remembered his, but it doesn't have an SD card inside, because I removed it to upload the photos onto my computer and didn't put it back. It is a tribute to his patience that he doesn't even get cross about it. Luckily, our phones take pretty decent photos.





Not sure where to go or what to do, we find a little café beside the Liston, have gelato and search Trip Advisor for a good restaurant for dinner. Dessert before dinner - we haven't done this before! The gelato scoops are enormous, so it's a good thing that our chosen restaurant, the Athos, doesn't open until 7.30. This gives us time to do a bit more exploring and walk off the gelato. In a small shop in a side street, we browse through the clothing racks and chat with the owner, who is very happy to meet someone else who had been in the garment business. "It's not an easy business" he said "but I like using psychology to sell". He pronounces the "p" in psychology in a most charming way. His p-s-ychology obviously works on us, because we buy a beautiful blue linen shirt for Rick, and don't haggle about the price even though we know we should. Dinner at the Anthos restaurant is delicious. Predictably, we both order the same main course: seared tuna strips with a balsamic sesame glaze. We decide that we might be able to prepare a similar dish at home, if only we could find tuna that fresh.

As we walk back to the Fort, the Liston has suddenly come alive, with hundreds of people out for their Sunday evening strolls. Making our way through the castle to the yacht club, we hear the strains of choir music drifting toward us. We wonder if perhaps it is a recording, but then we also hear violin music through an open window and see a man playing a violin in a small studio, with an older man providing direction. The violinist sees us watching, and smiles to acknowledge us. It seems there is a music academy inside the fortress. It all quite enchanting, but the return trip through the moat is a bit eerie in the dark, and there is barely enough space for us to squeeze through between the boats rafted up along the sides.

The next day, we head toward the streets near the New Fortress in search of the daily market. Lots of fresh vegetables, fruits and fish are on display, but the most interesting thing is the honey. We taste several types (acacia, thyme, wildflower) and realize they each have surprisingly unique tastes. But they are all delicious, and I leave with jars of several varieties in my knapsack. Greek yoghurt with honey and walnuts has become our new favourite thing for breakfast. During the walk back to the centre of the old town, the streets are a bustle of activity and construction. It looks like those lovely tiles require a lot of effort to maintain!





A snap election has been called in Greece, and we see flyers on the windshields of cars as we walk along. The one in the photo below is for Popular Unity, a party that favours Greek withdrawal from the Eurozone. It seems to point out that Greeks had said "Oxi" (no) to austerity in the recent referendum (but the government proceeded with the bail-out agreement). A week later, Alexis Tsipras's Syriza party prevails, and the Popular Unity party does not get enough votes to win even a single seat.



We spend an hour shopping for cool shirts for Rick in the Columbia store. (I mean "cool" as in lightweight, as opposed to "cool" from a fashion sense, because the weather is still blistering hot.) Then we have lunch at a family-run sidewalk restaurant a few steps away. I've been enjoying the challenge of deciphering words using the Greek alphabet, but the name of this restaurant really stumps me. Later, with a little help from Google translate, I discover that the large letters on the restaurant sign simply say "Beer and steakhouse" and the name of the restaurant is Chrisomalis. A poster above the door, commemorating 175 years of the Corfu Philharmonic Society, has a 1920 photo that shows an establishment called the "Anglo-American Bar" in the same location. The waiters look like they might have been around in 1920, and do not speak English. We try two traditional Corfu dishes: pastitsada ("rooster" in tomato sauce served with pasta) and sofrito (beef stew in a white wine, vinegar, garlic and herb sauce). Neither are gourmet fare, but both are very tasty, and could be nice comfort meals on a cold winter night.



We top off the afternoon with a walk through the area around the Liston and the fort, and through the grounds of the Museum of Asian Art.







When we return to Aisling, we see that we are surrounded by boats flying American flags and Cruising Club of America (CCA) burgees. It is the CCA's Ionian cruise, and now we are doubly sheepish that we haven't registered for it. But partial registrations weren't an option, and we could not join the full cruise as we need to make tracks for Albania and then Sicily. We head around the corner to Gouvia, where we plan to check out of Greece the following morning. That night, as we sit at anchor in a small cove near the marina, I feel sad that our travels in Greece have come to an end. But as it turns out, that isn't quite true after all.

The next morning, when Rick goes to the Port Police to check out, they inform him that because we are not a European-flagged boat, we must go to the main Port in Corfu town to check out. This means we have to either spend the entire morning sailing there and back, or take a cab, at a cost of about 50 euros for the return trip. Ouch. Suddenly we have a better idea: Nikos Bike Rental has motorcycles available for only 20 euros for the day. Once again, Rick's motorcycle license comes in handy, and ten minutes later we are strapping on helmets and buzzing toward Corfu town. When we spot a Lidl supermarket along the way, we're even happier. We've just finished the last of the wine we brought with us from Sicily, and this will be a good place to stock up. At the Port, we finish the check-out process in record time. The obliging Customs officer even lets us keep our cruising permit, in case we want to come back to Greece after our visit to Albania, telling us we can mail it back otherwise.

After a quick stop at Lidl, we are ready to set sail.
On the other hand....does it really make sense to turn the bike in without going for a ride? After a quick dinghy trip to the boat to stash our Lidl purchases, we hop back on the bike and head north along the coast. Initially there is lots of tourist sprawl. Here's where we can find our English breakfast! Get a tattoo! Buy English clothing by the kilo! Yes it's really by the kilo! But further along, the views become more scenic.

Our plan to visit the National Art Gallery annex in the village of Kato Korakiana are foiled, because it is closed for the day. We have a long history of at arriving at places on the wrong day, and we've learned not to get too perturbed when this happens. The village is very pleasant, so we don't regret making the drive. We double back to the coast, head further north and take the road toward the village of Spartylas. Up, up, up, around twisting switchbacks, through olive groves, with tantalizing glimpses of the coast below. It is difficult to find any safe havens to stop and take photos, but we eventually find a place to pull off the road. An eagle is soaring above an old olive grove.





Rick had noticed a taverna that seemed to have a great view a couple of kilometers back, so we decide to have lunch before heading back to Gouvia. At the Taverna Agnadia, the view is indeed wonderful, and the food is some of the best we have had in Greece, or anywhere in Europe for that matter. The highlight is a plate of fried artichokes served with a creamy garlic dip. The kitten at our feet clearly wants to try one, but they are just too good to share. The Dutch couple at the table next to us, who seem to know the owner, asks us who had told us about the taverna. They seem surprised to hear that we had found it by chance.







On the way back down the coast, it suddenly occurs to me that our passports have already been stamped out of Greece, and that we would have had a lot of explaining to do if anything had gone wrong. But all's well that ends well. We get back to the boat at 4 p.m. and wonder if it is too late to leave for Albania. But it is only a two hour sail away, and with a one-hour time difference we can probably be there well before six. So this time, it's really goodbye to Greece. At least for now!

Winding down the month of July

10 September 2015 | Preveza
Bonnie
We'd decided that Varko Bay would be our last stop before heading back to Cleopatra Marina near Preveza, where we would leave the boat for the month of August while we flew back to Canada. We enter the bay with the intention of anchoring on the west side, off Vathiavali Beach, but dozens of other boats had beaten us to it. As August approaches, the anchorages get fuller and fuller, and it will only get worse. But there is more room in the east end of the bay, and we anchor in almost the same place we'd been two weeks earlier. Our friends John and Jan on Brigantia are anchored closeby, but we don't even notice them until we get an email inviting us to drop over for a drink! We spend the next few days relaxing, swimming, socializing with John and Jan, and gradually depleting the contents of our freezer. Cooling off becomes our main concern, and Rick spends lots of time just floating around with his favourite new toy, a pool noodle. He's been wanting one ever since observing that Ni could drink a beer while keeping himself afloat with one of these!




Otherwise, our only real excitement comes from a fire on the mountainside behind the bay, which becomes large enough that the smoke wafts down and we begin to get worried. We're relieved when water bombers appear and extinguish the flames.



It turns out that Varko Bay is not our last stop after all. John and Jan sail off to Ligia, and we decide to follow them and have one more meal at the Seven Islands. Clearly, we have been more focused on eating than on sightseeing this month (and our waistlines reflect it) but it's really too hot for cooking. The evening is a lovely finale to our time together.



The next morning, we go back through the Levkas canal and tie up at Cleopatra marina. It's nice to see that Jim and Katie on Tenaya are just down the dock from us. We had met Jim and Katie in Almerimar in 2007, and although we hadn't seen them since then, we have followed their travels on their wonderful website, www.tenayatravels.com. They have completed a circumnavigation during the eight years that we have remained in the Mediterranean. We meet for dinner at the restaurant Panos just down the lane from the marina that evening, and enjoy hearing their stories of the many exotic locations they have visited. The next night, we eat at the marina restaurant, joined by our Canadian friends Marcel and Gislaine (Magibourg III) whom we had met in Marina di Ragusa several years previously.



Finally, it is time to lock up Aisling and catch our share-a-cab to the Athens airport for our flight home. For me, the drive is a real nightmare, jammed in the middle of the back seat, fighting back waves of panic as the driver drives at breakneck speed, literally racing with other vehicles, bumpers just inches apart. You can imagine my astonishment when we unfold ourselves from the cab at the airport and Rick complements the driver on his skill! But then, he always has enjoyed following the F1 circuit.

And before we know it, we are back in Halifax, eating take-out pizza in our kitchen with our family. Need I say it...there's no place like home!

Back to Ithaki

10 September 2015 | Preveza
Bonnie
With an almost endless choice of beautiful anchorages to choose from, and the mercury now edging toward 40 degrees, you may wonder why we chose Vathi, the capital of Ithaki, as our next stop. We'd already visited Vathi twice, and we knew we wouldn't be able to swim in the murky waters of the harbour. But Ithaki is one of the most beautiful islands in the Ionian -or in all of the Mediterranean, for that matter. It was less than a four-hour sail away, and I wanted to see it one more time. In his usual gentlemanly way, Rick agreed. Setting sail from Kastos shortly after 10, we had our anchor well set in the mud near the head of Vathi harbour by 1.30 in the afternoon.



To English speakers, Ithaki is better known as Ithaca, agreed by many to have been the home of Odysseus. Note I say, "agreed by many" and not "agreed by all" because no one knows whether Odysseus was a real or mythical character, nor whether any of the places described by Homer actually existed. Still, it's fun to read the stories and think of the possibilities.

By the time we have woken up from our afternoon naps, it is time to go ashore for a beer and track down some dinner. We recall a delicious lunch that we'd had with Ni and Krissy in a small taverna during our last visit, but can't remember the name or exactly where it was. A conversation with a Canadian on a neighbouring boat, who had lived in Vathi for several years, convinces us that it must be the Taverna Tpexanthpi (pronounced Trechantiri). Off we go, and take a small table on the sidewalk where we can watch the world go by.

The food is as good as we remembered, made with fresh local ingredients, including a complimentary dessert of rice pudding made with milk provided by the owner's goats. The octopus salad had capers and caper leaves that had also come from the owners' land. But, though it shames me to say it, the french fries were my favourite thing.



Returning to Aisling, we sit in the cockpit for a while, looking at the stars and the lights twinkling in the hills above Vathi on both sides of the harbour. "It's like floating in a big amphitheatre" I say, and later discover that this is exactly how some guidebooks describe Vathi harbour.

The next day, we do little other than buy a few groceries, catch up on emails and take the dinghy to the small beach at the mouth of the harbour to cool off. Now the question becomes whether to stay for another day, or move on. We have made a bad choice in anchoring too close to the town, where the smell of sewage wafts over the harbour when the wind blows from the west. But we finally decide to stay for one more night, rent a car and drive around the island. We have done this before on a scooter, but this time it is too hot to even think of putting on a helmet. A day in the air conditioned comfort of a rental car is just what we need.

Instead of taking the inland road as we had on our last drive, we head up the west coast toward Stavros, enjoying beautiful views across the water to Cephalonia as we go. Unfortunately, it is difficult to take photos on the steep winding roads. Also, I have forgotten my camera. Fortunately, Rick has come better prepared.






In Stavros, a bust of Odysseus and a model of his palace stand in a small park near the church. Some archeologists have speculated that Pelicata hill, near Stavros, could be the site of the palace. It's requires a bit of credulity to accept that any such place existed, but why spoil the fun.



We visit the small archeological museum, where we see clay bowls, jugs and figurines that date back as far as 3000-2000 BC. It's astonishing to realize that these fragile items have survived for more than 4000 years. Maybe the idea of Odysseus' palace isn't so far-fetched after all.



Next we drive up to the north tip of the island to Exoghi, a mountain village with spectacular views. The road is steep, narrow and winding, and Rick worries that we may not be able to turn the car around, but when we reach the church we are able to park in a spacious courtyard, under a eucalyptus tree. We have just missed the festival of Agia Marina, which took place the previous day (July 17th). The price list is still posted on the trunk of a tree: 2 euros for souvlaki, 3 euros for salad, 1 euro for bread, 2 euros for a beer or glass of wine...imagine the reaction if you tried serving beer and wine at a church festival in Cape Breton!







Back to Stavros for a late lunch at the roadside restaurant (? O Tseligkas) where, 6 years before, we had first tasted briam, one of Rick's favourite Greek dishes. Sadly, they do not have briam available today. Now we will never know if it was really as good as we remembered. The roasted eggplant and dolmades (vine leaves stuffed with rice) are delicious, but the stifling heat suppresses our usually hearty appetites. It's a relief to get back into the air conditioned car. A dead end road takes us past the village of Frikes and then to Kioni. Both are photogenic but touristy.







From the crossroads back at Stavros, we head inland and uphill toward the monastery of Kathara, near Anogi, 500 meters above sea level. We had also visited this place in 2009, and had been amused to see a sign in four languages that said "please close the door so the goats don't come inside". For some inexplicable reason, the parts of the sign that mentions that goats has been blacked out, even though the goats still roam freely outside the gates.



There is no one there but us and the caretaker, who sits quietly working on her crocheting. Inside, the church is a peaceful and cool retreat.





Around one of the icons hang many "tamata"; metal votive plaques with images of body parts. For example, a person praying for relief from arthritis, or giving thanks for successful knee surgery, might hang a plaque like this one.



Our last stop is the village of Perachori, sitting high in the hills above Vathi town. Even though it is very close to Vathi, we had not even known of its existence on our two previous visits. It's a charming place, with sweeping views of Vathi harbour, abundant flowers, small courtyards shaded by grape arbors and farm animals peeking over stone walls.










Wouldn't you like to look at a view like this while you hang your laundry out to dry?



Our last stop is the supermarket, where we load the car with the heavy and bulky items that are difficult to carry when we don't have transportation. We are well provisioned for our next stop in Varko Bay: the perfect place to escape from the heat.

Aisling's Ionian Tour: Varko Bay, Vlicho and Lygia

20 July 2015 | Varko Bay
There are so many things I'd forgotten about Greece. The jaw-dropping beauty of the scenery in and around the Ionian islands. The friendliness of the Greek people. Grape arbors and geraniums planted in feta cans. Ducking under trumpet vines and bougainvillea on a morning run. Elderly widows in black dresses and headscarves, sporting their moustaches with pride. The sweet relief of a glass of iced coffee on a hot day. Calamari and octopus cooked to perfection. Thick cut french fries, taramasalata, scordaglia and briam. The secret delight of feasting on Ruffles potato chips dipped in tzatziki. The word for bread. (It's psomi, by the way, and it tastes just like the bread my Granny used to make).

But most of all, I'd forgotten how hot it gets in Greece in July. Today it is 37 degrees. In case you haven't experienced a heat wave recently, that's really, really hot. So hot that you could get second degree burns from touching the metal on the deck. So hot that Rick spends a good part of each day thinking up schemes to cool things down onboard. These include pieces of canvas strung up as sunscreens, a windscoop above the forward hatch and a moveable 12-volt fan mounted on the base of a flowerpot (one of the many good ideas he'd picked up from Rick and Barbara during our visit to "Far Out"). In spite of all his efforts, the temperature below decks is rarely below 30 degrees at bedtime.

The best way to stay cool is by jumping into the water. Varko Bay, with its crystal-clear water and gorgeous view of the mountains, is the perfect anchorage. We swim, snorkel and go to the beach bar for iced coffee.



We take the dinghy ashore to the taverna in the Hotel Porto Varko for dinner and discover that we are their only clients. Our dinner is very simple and the wasps are numerous, but the house wine is surprisingly good and consequently the experience is very pleasant.

Naturally, this good fortune couldn't last forever. As is typical for most cruisers, we can always count on at least one breakdown leading to an unavoidable change to our itinerary. This time, we had problems with two critical items: our swim ladder and our fridge. The swim ladder had broken at one of the hinges and was probably easy to fix. But we couldn't believe that the fridge was acting up. Installed in Pescara at great cost less than three years ago, it is one of the newest pieces of equipment on the boat. Up to now, it's been ticking along beautifully. But it couldn't seem to keep up with the heat, which in turn was draining our new batteries. Nothing ruins Rick's day more quickly than a battery losing its charge. So off to Vlicho Bay we went. Here's a glimpse of some of the scenery that we saw along the way.



We've had some bad experiences in Vlicho Bay. We'd left our boat here one summer when we were called home suddenly due to the death of my cousin and returned to find that a rat had temporarily taken up residence in our bilge. We'd experienced 100 + knot winds here in a freak storm during the summer of 2011. But in spite of that, we do like Vlicho a lot. The scenery is spectacular, and we know that our old friend Horatio Todd will help us track down the appropriate people to weld our ladder and repair the fridge.

As it turns out, Horatio is on vacation in the mountains with his right-hand man Brian. Fortunately, his wife Orchide has stepped into the breach. "Horatio is 80 now" says Orchide. "He needs a break. Sometimes he even takes naps in the afternoon. I can hardly believe it!" I could point out that those of us who are 20 years younger than Horatio often need an afternoon nap in this heat, but I don't. I understand what she means. Horatio's larger-than-life personality is legendary.

It's the weekend, and we'll have to wait until Monday for the fridge repairman. Fortunately, the freezer is on a separate compressor and is still working well, so we help the fridge along by freezing some bottles of water and adding them to the fridge. Rick decides that insulation is paramount, and stacks a foam pad and all the pillows from our bed on the countertop over the fridge. When I object, he downgrades to a couple a polar fleece sleeping bags. We'll have little use for those in the immediate future so I decide I can live with that. Unfortunately, since 75% of our counter space is on top of the fridge and freezer, cooking will be difficult. Actually, this is not all that unfortunate, because Rick takes me to dinner ashore at the Café Elena and we have a very nice evening.

Being back in Vlicho is not so bad. In the morning, we take the dinghy ashore on the Geni side of the bay, and go for a long shady run. Then we go across to Nidri, do a little shopping, and have the best iced coffee ever, at the "No Menu" restaurant. Rick drops in to George's chandlery to pick up a few necessities, while I go shopping and buy a bright blue bikini. Don't worry, you will never get to see it. Especially after succumbing to the delights of the wonderful bakery on the other side of the street. The baklava was all Rick's fault. These grapes were much healthier.



Another bonus is finding our friends Tracy and Mike (Rio Luna) from Marina di Ragusa, anchored just off the Vlicho Yacht Club. We invite them to come for drinks and appetizers, and then decide to also invite San Franciscans Darold and Jennifer Massaro and their son Dante, who are doing a two-year cruise on their Pacific Seacraft 40, Benevento. Mike and Tracy treat us with tuna shashimi, and Jennifer and Darold bring an olive tapenade with crackers. With these contributions added to our caponata, bread, cheese, grapes and oregano Ruffles, the cocktail party stretches into dinnertime and beyond.



Dante is a wise and engaging child, as cruiser kids tend to be. "Dante, I'll bet the Italians really liked your name!" I say. Jennifer laughs. "They told him he was Italianissimo!" she says. He's 11 years old, but can hold his own in any crowd. When I comment that I think age 11 is the age when kids start to become adults, he looks a bit worried. "I hope I can still use my Lego for a while" he says. "Don't worry, Lego is still fun no matter how old you get" I tell him. He tours our boat, collecting ideas for his future naval architecture business. We star gaze, pick out constellations, and talk about books. I have more fun than I've had in weeks.

The fridge repair man arrives first thing Monday morning and solves our problem in less than an hour. We've lost some coolant because of a leaking O-ring, but it's a simple fix. Very quickly, the temperature in the fridge is back down to 5 degrees, and everyone is happy. And it only costs us 70 euros. Our swim ladder has also been repaired, so we decide to lift anchor and head for an anchorage with cleaner water. Too bad we can't anchor off Skorpios for a swim. Last time we were here, we'd had a wonderful afternoon there with our friends Donald and Victoria, their son Fraser and his fiancé Electra. Since then, Skorpios (which used to be owned by the Onassis family) has been bought by a Russian, and the entire perimeter is off limits. Which goes to show that Greek tycoons are a lot more hospitable than Russian tycoons.

Rick has read that the seafood restaurants in Lygia are especially good, and it's just a short sail away, near the entrance to the Lefkas canal. We are eating out far too often, but I don't put up much of a fuss. We'll be back to reality soon enough. In the anchorage in Lygia, we meet Americans Anne Marie and Ulrich on Jubilaeum, who have been sailing in this area for many years.



Anne Marie and Ulrich confirm that the Seven Islands is the best choice. It's certainly a pleasant place to spend an evening, and the food is delicious. Our appetizers of octopus salad and skordaglia (a garlic mashed potato dip that's a bit like aioli) are so substantial that we probably could have skipped the main course, but it's too late to turn back now. Our fish is also very fresh and very good.

We end the evening with a walk along the waterfront, which is lined with a vast choice of seafood tavernas. The next morning we come back to shore, leave our dinghy at the Seven Island's dock, and go for a run. It's a short one, because it quickly becomes too hot for running. Time for a swim!All aboard, we are off to Kastos next!
Vessel Name: Aisling I
Vessel Make/Model: Slocum 43
Hailing Port: Halifax, NS, Canada
Crew: Rick and Bonnie Salsman
About:
Crew from Halifax to Horta: Bonnie and Rick Salsman, Dave Morse, Wally Fraser Crew from Horta to Spain: Bonnie and Rick Salsman, Al Salsman, Rob Salsman We left Halifax, N.S. in June 2007, sailed to Horta, and explored the Azores for a month. [...]
Extra:
The info below is a copy and paste from some literature about the Slocum 43. Please excuse the platitudes. Although I may like them , they are not truly mine. Aisling I is a 1987 Slocum 43, designed by Stan Huntingford. She has been designed to satisfy the sailor who wants the blue water, "get [...]
Social:
Aisling I's Photos - Aisling I (Main)
Photos 1 to 7 of 7
1
South coast of France looking West from La Ciotat
La bec d
Aisling leaving RNSYS for Europe 2007 -1 (2)
DSCF2584: In St Georges, Bermuda after our first Ocean Passage 2002.....
Memories............. the Beach. From the front door of my parents cottage at Evangeline Beach, Nova Scotia, looking towards Cape Blomidon. The highest tides of the year. 43 feet twice a day. It
P4022273b: The Mary B Brooks
214 Tons. Built 1926 at Plympton, N.S., Canada. LOA 99
 
1
40 Photos
Created 10 July 2016
10 Photos
Created 21 March 2016
20 Photos
Created 14 September 2015
36 Photos
Created 16 May 2014
22 Photos
Created 13 May 2014
15 Photos
Created 5 May 2014
16 Photos
Created 29 April 2014
20 Photos
Created 26 April 2014
20 Photos
Created 25 June 2013
17 Photos
Created 22 May 2013
20 Photos
Created 18 September 2012
36 Photos
Created 12 September 2012
34 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 12 September 2012
34 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 12 September 2012
During the winter, we babysat Murphy Brown (a lovely poodle that belongs to our friends Wally and Martha) for 10 days. I had some fun capturing her in some of her favourite spots!
8 Photos
Created 16 May 2012
A few photos from our visit to Palermo, Sicily
20 Photos
Created 16 May 2012
21 Photos
Created 16 July 2011
2 Photos | 1 Sub-Album
Created 23 October 2010
9 Photos
Created 13 November 2009
21 Photos
Created 13 November 2009
40 Photos
Created 1 November 2009
34 Photos
Created 1 November 2009
31 Photos
Created 30 October 2009
41 Photos
Created 17 May 2009
Pics of Aisling at anchor, up top and down below.
23 Photos
Created 2 November 2008
22 Photos
Created 19 October 2008
15 Photos
Created 10 September 2008
7 Photos
Created 10 September 2008
6 Photos
Created 10 September 2008
19 Photos
Created 4 August 2008
6 Photos
Created 4 August 2008
14 Photos
Created 4 August 2008
5 Photos
Created 14 July 2008
16 Photos
Created 29 June 2008
3 Photos
Created 23 June 2008
15 Photos
Created 23 June 2008
35 Photos
Created 18 June 2008
22 Photos
Created 18 June 2008
20 Photos
Created 15 May 2008
5 Photos
Created 15 May 2008
10 Photos
Created 15 May 2008
10 Photos
Created 5 May 2008
11 Photos
Created 5 May 2008
7 Photos
Created 5 May 2008
6 Photos
Created 5 May 2008
5 Photos
Created 5 May 2008
15 Photos | 4 Sub-Albums
Created 19 March 2008
22 Photos
Created 30 January 2008
8 Photos
Created 30 January 2008
17 Photos
Created 10 September 2007
8 Photos
Created 1 September 2007
7 Photos
Created 1 September 2007
21 Photos
Created 29 August 2007
13 Photos
Created 17 August 2007
12 Photos
Created 17 August 2007
8 Photos
Created 24 July 2007
22 Photos
Created 21 July 2007
38 Photos
Created 14 July 2007
10 Photos
Created 14 July 2007