Blue Hour

Who: Jonathon, Nina, Joni, Jonas, Sirius
Port: Toronto
05 July 2022
05 July 2022
05 July 2022 | Nordre Bjørnsund, Norway
05 July 2022 | Nordre Bjørnsund, Norway
05 July 2022
05 July 2022 | Asen, Norway
05 July 2022 | Asen, Norway
05 July 2022 | Asen, Norway
05 July 2022 | Asen, Norway
05 July 2022 | Off the coast of Norway, Atlantic Ocean
05 July 2022 | Håholmen, Norway
29 June 2022 | Sleneset, Norway
29 June 2022 | Arctic Circle, Atlantic Ocean, Norway
29 June 2022 | Myken, Norway
29 June 2022 | Myken, Norway
29 June 2022 | Å, Røst, Norway
29 June 2022 | Sørvågen, Norway
23 June 2022 | Stamsund, Vestvågøya, Norway

05 July 2022
Joni Maguire
About to return home with two boxes of pizza.

05 July 2022
Joni Maguire
Extreme foul weather gear needed for the emergency pizza mission.

05 July 2022 | Nordre Bjørnsund, Norway
Joni Maguire

05 July 2022 | Nordre Bjørnsund, Norway
Joni Maguire
A gingerbread house in Nordre Bjørnsund.

05 July 2022
Joni Maguire
A pod of pilot whales followed us and swam next to Blue Hour.

A Ripped Sail and an Epic Pizza Mission

05 July 2022
Joni Maguire
Though the weather now is a bit terrible, we have achieved our goal of getting through the “boring” section of the coast and are in the nice dramatic fjord section, where we can wait out strong winds. The nice weather still held as we sailed to Nordre Bjørnsund, though, and we had a pleasant sail downwind despite the swell from the previous day’s south wind. Our good luck gave out as we were sailing through a sketchy inner coastal route filled with many rocks and a winding route for ships, when our code zero severely ripped. We were trying to unfurl it when the top pinched and a small tear appeared, and as we tried to re-furl the sail to mitigate further damage, it ripped completely from the luff to leech and in many other directions. We eventually furled it then had to take it down, as it was still flapping about.

When we got into port, we began the lengthy process of attempting to remove the code zero from its furler on the rickety dock, interrupted several times when it started to rain, in order to assess the damage and see if we could fix it ourselves or if we needed to take it to a sail maker. We concluded that we need to take it to a professional, as it is torn completely in two and has many long tatters hanging off it. One of the locals, Otto, recommended a sailmaker in the nearby city of Ålesund, which we will travel to soon.

Nordre Bjørnsund is the most picturesque village I have ever seen. All the houses are super well-kept and decorated, with fresh coats of bright paint and ornate carvings in the trim. Arranged patterns of lupines and rose of sharons are in spirals in the gardens. The roads are made of shimmering white gravel, which must have been imported. It basically looks like a movie set. Apparently, the village was forced to resettle by the Norwegian government in the 1960s, so that only summer cottages are there now and no one lives there year-round. I don’t know whether the village is so idyllic in spite of or because of that.

For some reason, while the settlement is so well-kept and accessible, the visitors’ dock is in a separate section that requires a sketchy trip across steep slippery rocks and narrow crumbling breakwaters from the 1920s to reach the houses. There is also a walkway to a lighthouse in a third section of Nordre Bjørnsund which has many well-cared for and secured bridges and railings to access in contrast to the sketchy path to the visitors’ dock. It can apparently get super windy and wavy beyond the harbour, which is exposed to the whole Atlantic Ocean, and metal bridges going to the lighthouse are in the process of being repaired after the sea completely destroyed them, as well as one of the houses, which had been completely carried away by a storm.

We are currently in Svinøya to escape strong winds, although it is still pretty windy here and very rainy. I hid down below from the bad weather and decided to read an entire book in one day – I don’t know why – and now that I have done that I plan to read the entire sequel tomorrow. Though Blue Hour is in what appears to be a remote anchorage, there is a suburban town a short dinghy ride away which we decided to brave the weather to go to, partly due to the fact that we have been out of milk for a while and needed to buy more, and also because we had a sudden craving for pizza. We all got dressed up in our foul weather gear and must have looked very strange walking around town – Mum was wearing a droopy sou’wester and Dad a puffy and mouldy floater coat, all of which are at least thirty years old. I don’t regret this, though, because it was pouring rain and miserable outside and we needed the protection. We ordered pizza, which was difficult because the people in the restaurant didn’t speak English and we had to resort to pointing at pictures on a phone to order, then Mum and I looked for milk while Dad went shoe shopping with Jonas. Both of these activities proved to be more difficult than expected, as Dad tried on eight pairs of hiking boots before finding good ones, and Mum tried to go into a mall to get milk, found that it was closed, went into a convenient store but they didn’t have any, found an alternative route into the mall, realized the store in the mall was actually a department store, had trouble getting out of the mall, walked further to the grocery store, wasn’t able to pay, and had to send Dad there to purchase it instead. Then, after picking up the pizzas, we put them in garbage bags to keep safe from the rain and I held onto them for dear life as we violently splashed our way upwind back to Blue Hour. Luckily the pizzas still tasted good after reheating them in the oven.

05 July 2022 | Asen, Norway
Joni Maguire

05 July 2022 | Asen, Norway
Joni Maguire

05 July 2022 | Asen, Norway
Joni Maguire

05 July 2022 | Asen, Norway
Joni Maguire

05 July 2022 | Off the coast of Norway, Atlantic Ocean
Joni Maguire
Hanging out under way.

Heading South

05 July 2022 | Håholmen, Norway
Joni Maguire
The past few days have been spent heading south along the coast, taking advantage of the light north wind and sailing long days. Our plan is to round the peninsula Statt and go to the area around Florø, where we will have the shortest distance in which to cross to Scotland. Apparently this section of Norway is considered the “boring” part, as there are fewer dramatic mountains and fjords, but it is still very nice considering that this type scenery is considered amazing in Canada.

On the first day, we left Slåttøya and sailed 75 nautical miles to the town of Rørvik. Though we did leave early in the morning and get into port after dinner, it was so flat calm that we could basically do what we normally do during the day without getting seasick. I made cookies and read a lot while Mum and Jonas played cards. Rørvik had a pretty old town section that was unfortunately overrun by seagulls, causing the locals to avoid it. The seagulls were completely covering the old buildings and their poo was everywhere. We walked through the old town and got dive-bombed, especially Sirius, who now has an intense feud with them. He once spent a few minutes shouting at a seagull sitting on a building while the seagull shouted back. We took advantage of being in a town to go shopping and bought delicious Norwegian strawberries and nectarines, which were the best fruits we had eaten in a while. Jonas and Dad went into a sports store to buy a new fishing net, as the old one had snapped and been lost overboard earlier that day.

We left early the next morning and sailed 74 nautical miles to Asen, still enjoying calm weather and favourable winds, then sailed 58 nautical miles to Leirvik the day after that. I baked some more cookies and Jonas and I finished our book. It was filled mostly with well-kept cottages, and a road that looked like the Trans-Canada Highway. We saw many pretty pale pink wild rose of sharon bushes, as well as two beautiful horses grazing by the road that Sirius luckily didn’t notice.

As we sailed to Håholmen, the good conditions for hurrying south were starting to disappear, as the wind and waves were directly in front of us, which made going fairly unpleasant. We didn’t go as far as the other days due to the waves and turned into Håholmen, a place we had been to last time we were in Norway three years ago but hadn’t thought very highly of. This time around, we skipped the resort and went for a walk on one of the other remote islands and had a much better time. Jonas caught two mackerel, which we ate for dinner.

29 June 2022 | Sleneset, Norway
Joni Maguire

29 June 2022 | Arctic Circle, Atlantic Ocean, Norway
Joni Maguire
Sacrificing maple syrup to Poseidon

29 June 2022 | Myken, Norway
Joni Maguire

29 June 2022 | Myken, Norway
Joni Maguire
Midnight.

29 June 2022 | Å, Røst, Norway
Joni Maguire

29 June 2022 | Sørvågen, Norway
Joni Maguire

Losing Beautiful Arctic Scenery But Gaining Beautiful Weather

29 June 2022 | Atlantic Ocean, Norway
Joni Maguire
We stayed in Stamsund one more day as the bad weather continued. We cleaned the boat and sorted out the lockers, including the hanging locker in me and Jonas's cabin, which we had been too cowardly to do when we first got to the boat due to all the mould. Right beside Blue Hour's dock, along with a restaurant and the Coop grocery store, was a theatre called Figurteatret, which is puppet and figure theatre known for providing financial support and space for other small production companies. As there was a show that evening, Mum bought tickets, and we saw a preview of a British production called Delicate Bodies. It was really interesting and I'm not sure how exactly to describe it. There were four characters and a small stage set up with a set roughly in the shape of a house. It told a story of the four characters and their interactions while also incorporating a lot of acrobatics and dance. One of the actors was especially impressive, as at one point he was holding himself completely parallel to the floor about two meters high on a pole with only his feet and calves.

The next day we sailed to Sørvågen and Mum, Jonas, Dad, and Sirius went on a giant hike but I stayed home because I had a migraine, which was really disappointing because apparently they went had a beautiful view at the top of the mountain. The next day, we walked along the road to a town called Å. As it is the furthest west settlement in the Lofoten islands, its name is the last letter of the Norwegian alphabet. In Å, we went to a cute old-fashioned bakery and ate kanellsnurr at a picnic table outside. Mum wanted to go to a cod drying museum, as she has become obsessed with all the cod drying racks we have been seeing everywhere, but sadly it was closed and Dad wanted to leave before the wind picked up so we couldn't stay for it to open.

Our next destination, Røst, was still part of the Lofoten Islands but further south and offshore from most of the archipelago. The small town had the most cod drying racks I have ever seen, looking almost like housing complexes from afar and occupying more space than the actual houses (or at least as far as I could tell). Mum and I stayed up to watch the midnight sun for the last time, as once we leave the arctic we won't be able to. In the morning, we got the Brompton foldable bicycles out from the various places that they are wedged (under Mum and Dad's bunk, under the settee, and under me and Jonas's bunk - we basically have to take the interior of Blue Hour apart to get to them) and went for a ride around the island.

Our voyage the next day involved leaving the Lofoten Islands, as well as crossing the Arctic Circle and leaving the arctic. I was quite sad to be doing so, as the scenery has been so beautiful this past month and I have enjoyed being in Arctic Norway much better than the more southern sections, although they are still really nice. We decided to give a sacrifice to Poseidon to thank him for all the good weather so we poured some maple syrup in the water as a taste of Canada, as well as tossing in a bouquet of wildflowers that Mum had picked.

Basically as soon as we left the arctic, the weather suddenly got super warm and sunny. We changed into shorts and T-shirts and opened up the boat to let some air in and dry out everything that was soggy. I had forgotten how much nicer the sun makes everything feel, not having experienced it for a while. We are currently under way travelling through some small islands, having left a place called Sleneset this morning after taking Zoom into town and walking around. Although it rained this morning, it is still beautiful weather and the temperature is getting warmer. Hopefully it will continue to feel like summer!


23 June 2022 | Stamsund, Vestvågøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
Outdoor rope course.

23 June 2022
Joni Maguire
Coming down the steep mountain.

23 June 2022 | Stamsund, Vestvågøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
At the top of the second hike.

23 June 2022 | Valvågen, Austvågøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

23 June 2022 | Valvågen, Austvågøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
At the top of the first hike.

23 June 2022 | Off the coast of the Lofoten Islands, Norway
Joni Maguire
Reading under way.

23 June 2022 | Kvannkjosen, Hinnøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
Jonas is making me say that this is a five and a half pound pollock but he also caught a seven pound pollock that he doesn't have a picture of.

Beautiful Hiking in Lofoten

23 June 2022 | Stamsund, Vestvågøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
When we first arrived in the Lofoten Islands, we were surprised to see that the scenery was pretty similar to that of Lake Superior, with a few extra mountains. It was a familiar experience when Dad and I walked around Kvannkjosen – wilderness except for a cottage – due to the rolling hills and the smell of pine. The addition of forests now that we have come further south was another welcome surprise; I hadn’t realized how much I had missed the trees. While Dad and I walked, Jonas caught a seven pound pollock, which we ate for dinner. We were a little worried about pulling the anchor up when we got ready to leave the next day, as the bottom was quite rocky and we had heard the anchor chain scraping across rocks on the bottom all night, but it came up without any problems and we set sail.

Valvågen, mainly a fishing harbour, a highway, and a few scattered houses, looked a bit less like Lake Superior. There were more tall ranges of jaggedy mountains that I remembered from the last time we were in Lofoten three years ago. Another thing I remember is great hiking with great views, so Mum, Jonas, Sirius, and I hiked to the top of a mountain that evening. Though the guide book labelled the hike as ‘easy’, we found it to be pretty difficult. To make ourselves feel better we pretended that we were characters from Lord of the Rings (I was Aragorn and Jonas was Gollum because he kept laughing maniacally for no reason). Luckily there was a beautiful view, as promised, of snow-capped mountains all around us. There were also two cairns marking the two times when Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany visited and climbed them near the end of the 19th century, where we stopped and ate chocolate.

We are currently in Stamsund (it now looks nothing like Lake Superior; there are way too many dramatic mountains) and have been here for two days, waiting out bad weather. It is lucky that we managed to find a well-protected place to stay, as there are two low pressure weather systems that merged passing over Norway and the weather is extremely windy. The first afternoon, we all went for an even longer hike with an even better view of the mountains which the guide book ominously labelled ‘intermediate’. The hike was supposed to be five hours long and take us across a mountain range, but with the exception of Mum, we were all too weak to attempt that so we only went to the first two peaks, ate some trail mix, and turned around. The slope going down was quite steep, but luckily no one got hurt (except when Mum fell into a patch of thistles but she was fine after). Blue Hour’s dock is directly beneath a restaurant, so we went out for dinner for the first time this cruise. There was a buffet dinner with a lot of local fish, as well as a variety of other local foods including roast potatoes, which was delicious despite the unnervingly intense waiter.

Blue Hour’s dock is also directly beside the Coop grocery store, so as soon as it opened at eight o’clock the next day, Mum and I went and bought pastries for breakfast and lunch. We then hung around for most of the morning before going for a walk, as Sirius was too intimidated by the weather to get out of bed. We eventually went for a walk around a lake. I made cookies this evening while everyone else played cards. I’m not sure whether we’ll be leaving tomorrow or staying another day, as we’re still waiting on the weather forecast.

17 June 2022 | Tromsø, Tromsøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
Bringing home pastries.

17 June 2022 | Tromsø, Tromsøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

Back in Tromsø

17 June 2022 | Tromsø, Tromsøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
It felt strange to sail back into Tromsø, as it has been almost a month since we left to head north. If we hadn’t left Toronto early but had gone when we usually did in mid-June, this is basically where we would be. We wouldn’t have had time to sail north, however, which is now my favourite part of Norway and maybe one of my favourite places in the world.

Arriving back in Tromsø, which has around 64,000 inhabitants, gave me culture shock. It felt like a giant city compared to the wilderness anchorages or small fishing villages we had gotten used to, and was somewhat overwhelming.

Basically all we did in the city was eat pastries all day: we went out to a great café for breakfast on Thursday and Friday, then got pizza from our favourite pizza shop for dinner both evenings. Everything was delicious. In addition, we did a bunch of errands. Mum went grocery shopping and Dad and Jonas went to the marine store to buy a new main outhaul and a part for Zoom’s engine – it was broken and the reverse didn’t work. Mum and I went to a great bookstore, which made me very happy, as I hadn’t been to one in a long time. They had an English section with many books that I liked, and I got a beautiful-looking book on Norse mythology. Dad also dived into the toilet to fix a sewage problem, and I completed my last day of school for this year.

Today, after getting breakfast from the bakery, we have been sailing through protected sounds, which are flat calm. What I have realized is that the landscape and the population is considerably different south of Tromsø: the north has more rugged and dramatic scenery, as well as more wilderness. What we are sailing past now, while definitely still beautiful, looks almost like cottage country in Ontario with a backdrop of snow-capped mountains. I was also surprised to see so many trees.

We will arrive in port late at around 10:00 PM because we wanted to travel far so that we can time the current correctly tomorrow and sail to the Lofoten Islands.

17 June 2022 | Indre Pollen, Norway
Joni Maguire

17 June 2022 | Indre Pollen, Norway
Joni Maguire

17 June 2022 | Indre Pollen, Norway
Joni Maguire

17 June 2022 | Havøysund, Norway
Joni Maguire

Turning Around

17 June 2022 | Arnøyhamn, Norway
Joni Maguire
We decided to turn around and begin heading west and then south after reaching the town of Havøysund. We had been planning to sail to Nordkapp, the most northern point in Europe, but weren’t able to due to unfavourable weather conditions. However, I’m not that upset about it: since we were outside of the warm weather provided by the Gulf Stream, it was frigid and drizzly outside, so even if we had gone further north, we wouldn’t have been able to enjoy the beautiful scenery or hiking. We were also able to see Nordkapp from a distance when we went on a hike in Havøysund, as we were only half a day’s journey away.

Our walk in Havøysund went along a paved road up a hill through a field of wind generators. They were huge when we got close to them, and combined with the misty weather made the scenery feel a bit ominous. As I said, we got a good view of Nordkapp through the mist, and the compass on Dad’s phone registered that we were over 71º north.

After turning around, we sailed to Indre Pollen, which was another beautiful wilderness anchorage. Mum and I walked around through the hills and got our feet wet in the squelchy moss as usual. There were many birds flying over our heads (mainly seagulls and terns) on top of the hill, and I was nervous that we were disturbing them, so we walked down to the coast. Unfortunately, we accidentally walked to where the birds’ nests were and almost got dive-bombed by them. In the evening, Mum and Jonas went clam raking, and although they weren’t able to find any clams, they brought back a bucket of mussels for dinner.

We then sailed to Bergsfjord, a small village which we had been to before. Mum, Jonas, Sirius, and I walked along the coastal road, then across a bridge to a small island, which we circumnavigated. The next day we sailed to Arnøyhamn, and from there we are planning on sailing back to Tromsø.

10 June 2022 | Burstad, Norway
Joni Maguire

10 June 2022 | Akkerfjord, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

10 June 2022 | Akkerfjord, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

10 June 2022 | Akkerfjord, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

Days 24 & 25: Waiting Out Bad Weather

10 June 2022 | Burstad, Norway
Joni Maguire
Not much has happened the past few days, as we spent them waiting out windy weather in Akkerfjord. There was a concrete dock there, which was reassuringly sturdy, and the harbour was pretty protected. When the big gusts of wind came, though, water flooded the dock and Blue Hour heeled way over so that the gunnel was nearly touching the concrete. The fenders sounded like they were about to burst a few times. Luckily it was cozy and warm down below thanks to the heater, so it was nice to sit in blankets and play Suspend or bake cookies.

Yesterday morning, the weather was mostly sunny, though still windy, so we went for a walk in the hills. There was a gravel road that wound through them, from the port of Akkerfjord to the other side of the island. We nearly got to the end but had to turn around because the road was blocked by sheep who refused to move and Sirius was going nuts. Because it was quite cold and windy when we left the boat, we all put on warm clothing for the walk. Dad even went back to put on a second pair of pants. However, by the time we were protected by the hills and the sun came out, we were all sweating. I took off my coat and sweater, while Dad had to sit down and take off his coat and second pair of pants, which took a long time, and tied them around his waist.

This afternoon once school was over, the wind had mostly calmed down, so we left Akkerfjord and sailed to Burstad. It was a mostly wilderness anchorage with the exception of a few cottages, which may or may not have been abandoned. It was wavy going there, but luckily we were going downwind so Jonas and Dad only got mildly seasick and Mum and I were mostly fine.

I don’t know whether it actually was this windy or whether it was only the katabatic winds, but it got really windy in the anchorage a few times. Luckily the holding for the anchor was good, so we were pretty secure. Mum and Dad took Sirius for his evening walk in the wind and rain, while I made chocolate chip cookies. Because it doesn’t get dark here, it’s hard to know what the time is; I started baking the cookies before I realized that it was past 9:00 PM.

07 June 2022 | Husfjorden, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

07 June 2022 | Valbukta, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

07 June 2022 | Valbukta, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
Mum and I kayaking in Sunset and Blubbo while Jonas sails in the opti.

07 June 2022 | Hasvik, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

07 June 2022 | Hasvik, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
Cave where 35 residents of Hasvik hid in during the winter of 1944.

07 June 2022 | Hasvik, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
German WWII gun base.

Days 20-23: Circumnavigating Sørøya

07 June 2022 | Akkerfjord, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
As we continue to sail around Sørøya, the internet is unfortunately scarce - apologies for the infrequent blog posts. We are planning to leave Sørøya and head east towards Nordkapp in a few days after a spell of bad weather passes, where we will probably have better internet connections.

Though we had planned to leave Hasvik on Saturday morning, we got derailed by accidentally sleeping in and meeting a man named Paul on the dock, who kindly offered to drive us around and take us to interesting locations nearby. Paul drove us to the top of the nearby hill, which, alongside a beautiful view of mainland Norway, had the remains of German cannon bases from World War II for firing at approaching vessels. They were large concrete structures, which the Germans blew up as they were leaving. The remains of rebar could be seen sticking out from the giant overturned blocks of concrete, as well as pieces of metal that had been used for rebar when supplies were scarce, such as a section of railroad track.

Paul then drove us to see a cave well hidden at the bottom of a hill and underneath a rocky overhang, in which thirty-five residents of Hasvik had hidden for the winter of 1944 when the Germans issued an order saying that the residents of the island were required to evacuate. The cave was shallow and wasn’t tiny but would still have been a tight fit for thirty-five people. It was widely exposed at its mouth to the elements and the Atlantic Ocean. Apparently, when storms came, the cave was flooded by the ocean, though luckily the winter during which it had been the home of the residents of Hasvik had been a fairly mild one. It was hard to imagine living in such a place in winter times, as there was little shelter or resources; fires couldn’t be lit during the daytime for fear that they would be seen by the Germans nearby on the island. The inhabitants were eventually picked up by Scottish boats in the spring. Paul then drove us further along the island, where we could see more beautiful views of the mountains and fjord.

As it was a misty day, the mountains appeared to be cut off by the fog and were quite dramatic. We are very thankful to Paul for explaining the history of the cave and the island, as well as for giving us a guided tour of Hasvik and it’s surrounding areas.


On Sunday, we continued along Sørøya to Valbukta, where we went kayaking (and opti-sailing in Jonas’s case). I went in my kayak Sunset, Mum went in our blow-up kayak, Jonas sailed the opti, and Dad and Sirius went in Zoom. We paddled past the headland behind which Blue Hour was tucked, and continued down the fjord to a small island. While Dad let Sirius out of the boat to run around, Mum, Jonas, and I went to the other side of the island to see the seals. We didn’t get to see any super up-close on land, but there were plenty swimming around us in the water. We saw many heads pop up and dive back into the water.

Dad and Sirius were by far the fastest in Zoom, as it has a motor, while Sunset is the second-fastest vessel, being a good-quality kayak. The blow-up kayak (which we call Blubbo), is unfortunately a bit slow and difficult to maneuver, as it swings a lot from side to side as it is paddled. However, Mum reported that it was very comfortable to sit in, as it is basically an air mattress in the shape of a boat. Jonas’s opti (a small sailing dinghy) was a bit smaller than he remembered from the last time he sailed it, but he still had fun. It was a calm day, so he was at times quite slow and had to paddle with Zoom’s oar, but sailed well when the wind came up.


Husfjorden, Monday’s location, was in my opinion the place with the most dramatic scenery that we have been to yet this year. There was a 360º view of rocky, snow-capped mountains encircling the bay, as well as a view to the mountain-lined fjord beyond. It was difficult to anchor in, though, as the place where we first put the anchor down was too rocky to hold, the second place was too deep, and the third had good holding but was a bit lacking in swinging room. Mum, Jonas, and Sirius went to shore, while I stayed behind to do school.

Unfortunately, due to the majestic mountains surrounding Husfjorden, when the wind came up slightly, it created a katabatic wind which gusted quite strongly down the mountains in sudden gusts. Dad got anxious about the fact that the wind was only expected to pick up overnight, becoming quite strong even without the katabatic effect, so in the late evening we weighed anchor and headed to the nearby town of Akkerfjord, a place which we have been before this year. Since it never gets dark here, it was no big deal to sail during the late evening and arrive at our destination a bit past midnight, although Jonas and I went to bed before we got into port. Having arrived back in Akkerfjord, we have officially circumnavigated Sørøya.


Today was spent not doing very much; as it was rain and windy, we mostly stayed inside. I did school, Dad did work, and Sirius curled up in bed for most of the day. In the late afternoon, we played Jungle Speed and Spot It, then ate dinner and went to bed.

04 June 2022 | Hasvik, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
Sirius does not approve of arctic weather.

04 June 2022 | Sorvær, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire

04 June 2022 | Sorvær, Sørøya, Norway
Joni Maguire
Vessel Name: Blue Hour
Vessel Make/Model: Westerly Ocean 49
Hailing Port: Toronto
Crew: Jonathon, Nina, Joni, Jonas, Sirius
Blue Hour's Photos - Main
6 Photos
Created 29 May 2022
8 Photos
Created 17 May 2022
This is the light show in Cascais, Portugal.
21 Photos
Created 27 September 2017
11 Photos
Created 15 June 2017

Who: Jonathon, Nina, Joni, Jonas, Sirius
Port: Toronto