Danza Heads to the Arctic

Vessel Name: Danza
Vessel Make/Model: Robert Clark
Hailing Port: Edgecomb, Maine
Crew: David Nutt, Judy Sandick, David R Nutt, Sarah Nutt, Charlotte Nutt, Jeff Hankins
About: Family, family including nephew Jeff Hankins. Missing Jasper Nutt who is working for the summer.
Extra: We did a circumnavigation on Danza 2000/2005 with the family leaving with the kids ages 4, 9,10 & 12. Life in the slow lane and it could not have been better.
05 August 2010
27 July 2010
16 July 2010 | Davis Straits
16 July 2010
05 July 2010 | Woods Island
05 July 2010 | Neddy Harbor
07 June 2010 | West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
04 June 2010
Recent Blog Posts
05 August 2010

Ilulissat to Maniitsoq

Life in Greenland is not all fun in the sun, the glaciers and the spectacular scenery. We left Ilulissiat in the sun after a fantastic collective dinner with our Swedish friends on Ariel IV. It was sad to say goodbye to them as the head towards the Northwest Passage and say goodbye to the icefjord as [...]

27 July 2010

Iluisaat

We are in Ilusiaat. This is the source of many of the icebergs that come down the coast of

16 July 2010 | Davis Straits

on passage

You may be having a heat wave back in America but we are not out here. Two pairs of longjohns, 3 fleece on top of innumerable inner shirts, ski parka for the coldest of winter days plus foul weather gear and never enough hat and gloves. But we would not trade you.

16 July 2010

Nuuk, Greenland

July 15, 2010

05 July 2010 | Woods Island

Newfoundland

This should have gone up before the other one. So it goes...

05 July 2010 | Neddy Harbor

Newfoundland

July 1, 2010, Canada Day!

Ilulissat to Maniitsoq

05 August 2010
David Nutt
Life in Greenland is not all fun in the sun, the glaciers and the spectacular scenery. We left Ilulissiat in the sun after a fantastic collective dinner with our Swedish friends on Ariel IV. It was sad to say goodbye to them as the head towards the Northwest Passage and say goodbye to the icefjord as we wandered in awe towards Aasiaat and points south. We had some good sailing early in the day and by evening we decided to keep on heading south. The clouds thickened and the winds diminished.
We motor sailed and received a forecast from the Greenland radio of impending strong southerlies. It would be easier in many places to tie up to the cliffs than to find a place to anchor but we were fortunate to find a little spot in the first cove on the south side of a small fjord called Iserquk (66°07.1'N 053°38.2'W). We set our anchor with the last breath of a northerly zephyr and a sigh of relief. 60 seconds later Danza swung 180° and five days of southerlies commenced. It blew up to 30 knots in our nice little cove and who knows how much outside leaving us with few options. At one point the anchor did drag and it took some time to get the massive cluster of grass, weed and kelp off it so we could re-anchor.
Although the fjord is uninhabited the waters are fished by local fishermen who took the opportunity of Danza to sell two incredible still twitching salmon. Some good hikes were made ashore and small projects and books were read aboard with no end to the scrabble and cribbage games.
After several days we had a lull in the gale and thought we could make a few miles south but they turned out to be hard earned. It took us the better part of a day to make 25 miles to the anchorage in Agpamiut in Hamborgersund. We spent several days there as well with winds pushing towards gale force.
Hamborersund is one of the many most spectacular places on the west coast of Greenland. Perhaps it is better not to rate them but to simply enjoy them for their own beauty. The glaciers with skiable snow still in the shadows, the peaks tearing the clouds to shreads, and because of the heavy rains we had the streams became alive painting every imaginable little valley painting the hills and mountains with white streaks. It leaves little room for one's breath at times. Utterly astounding.
And yesterday we made a short run to Maniitsoq where we will re-provision, do a few repairs before heading to Nuuk and with a favorable weather window head back across the Davis Straits to Newfoundland.

Iluisaat

27 July 2010
David
We are in Ilusiaat. This is the source of many of the icebergs that come down the coast of

on passage

16 July 2010 | Davis Straits
David
You may be having a heat wave back in America but we are not out here. Two pairs of longjohns, 3 fleece on top of innumerable inner shirts, ski parka for the coldest of winter days plus foul weather gear and never enough hat and gloves. But we would not trade you.

Nuuk, Greenland

16 July 2010
David
July 15, 2010
Nuuk, Greenland
Our passage from Cartwright, Labrador was really good but that doesn't mean we weren't ready for a good sleep. We carried a southeast wind all the way that built from 4 or 5 knots to close to 30 by the time we arrived having given us more than 200 miles/day for the last 2 days. What we call 'Danza country'! The last day the fog descended teasing us with variable visibility. It lifted as we neared the coast to expose an iceberg to port and then one to starboard, both so massive that hitting one would have been no less catastrophic than running into a cliff.
As we made our way north the days never really ended nor began. Light hung around at the end of one day and became the next with never a need for the headlamp to read the book. My body never really knows what time it is and it is easy to stay up too late, miss meals and have a sense of having misplaced a part of the day.
We made our way into Nuuk via the Nordlob pass which is the way most of the big ship come and go and sure enough as soon as we were in the middle of it all several ships were coming and going. At that point we were down to a double reef in the main and just the staysail forward and still going 9 and 10 knots. We rounded up just outside the harbor and pulled it all down and soaked in behind one of the big boys. Rounding the commercial pier we saw two yachts tied to a barge and were welcomed by the Swedish boat Ariel IV to tie along side. They had arrived 5 hours earlier and knew how glad we were to be in.
In this small world of boats out here Ariel had circumnavigated starting the year before we did and we have many cruising friends in common. They are now on their way to Alaska via the Northwest Passage.
Nuuk is the commercial hub of Greenland with the container dock buzzing with cranes, forklifts and trucks. The harbor is dirty with many dying fishing boats laying ahead of us. There are a multitude of small outboards rafted together at the head of the harbor some of which go out at full speed and soon return at the same rate. Where they go I haven't a clue.
But the people are really friendly and helpful and as in most of the world speak English without missing a beat. Internet is in the town and every cell phone in the world works here except those from America.
In a few days we will start working our way north along the coast headed to Disko Bay.


Newfoundland

05 July 2010 | Woods Island
David Nutt
This should have gone up before the other one. So it goes...
Tuesday, June 29, 2010
Woods Island, Bay of Islands, Newfoundland. Arrived here midday today with a northeast wind in our teeth. We hadn't planned to stop but it seemed to make sense given wind, waves, temperature and fatigue. We left Baddeck at 5am the morning before so we would have the current help carry us out the Great Bras d'Or Channel. The fog was thick and I was uncomfortable about that and I was uncomfortable about our impending passage across the Cabot Straits. I am not used to being nervous before a passage, especially one of less than 100 miles. We had all become accustomed to them on our circumnavigation. The Atlantic, only a couple of thousand miles, no worries. But not now.
As we left the Channel the fog lifted giving reasonable visibility. The winds stayed really light and from behind. Should we set the kite? Maybe we should have left on the #1 genoa on instead of replacing it with the Yankee. And then a little wind began to fill in from the east. One by one the sails came out, the main, mizzen, Yankee and then the staysail. We would have put up more if we had had them. And the wind kept building from the east and the fog shut in. The forecast seemed to be panning out, we just hoped it didn't reached the 'gusting to 40 knots' that they added almost as an afterthought. Down came the mizzen, the boat speed increased. We were doing steady 8's and more. The first reef went in the main. It was really easy, I lay in the pilot berth and listened as the younger portion of the crew did all the work. What a crew! The wind held steady in the mid twenties and we were rolling off the miles. The fog still only gave up a few hundred feet of viz. We never did see any shipping all the way across even on the radar. As we started up the west coast of Newfoundland the sun broke through, the fog dissipated and the wind died very abruptly. There wasn't even enough to sail so we reluctantly started the engine.
By morning the wind began to build on the nose and kept on building and so we are here in the wonderful little anchorage. We met a local fellow and his wife; he grew up here as a child but was forced to move to the mainland during the resettlements. The final straw was when the school was burned, reportedly a government action, so the families all had to leave. Sounded like there was a lot of bitterness still in the air. We sat on his steps and shared a warm beer. A big part of why we came here. Not that we knew the details before today. It is a pleasure to watch the experience unfold a moment at a time. Summers are spent here on the island. He fishes a few lobster traps during their April to June season. Prices have been low the last few years and it is really hard to make ends meet. A familiar story with a different accent. We hope we can have him and his wife aboard tomorrow for a visit.
We will head in to the town of Corner Brook for some parts and reprovisioning and to await a better weather window before heading north along the coast again. But that is to be another story.
Cheers, David, Judy, et al....

Newfoundland

05 July 2010 | Neddy Harbor
David Nutt
July 1, 2010, Canada Day!
So much for Corner Brook. Yesterday saw 40 knots of wind across the deck from time to time. The little harbor at Woods Island was a perfect place to let it blow like that. Winds waves were such that a trip to shore in the dinghy might have been a bad choice so we spent some time working on the perpetual projects that keep emerging on the boat. When we finally made it ashore late in the afternoon we saw williwaws on the far shore, where we by chance had not anchored the previous day, lifting water in a multitude of directions hundreds of feet in the air. I cannot imagine what it would have been like to be there.
Gerald Hickey came out in his dory for a cup of tea. He talked with a tone of bitterness about the resettlement 50 years ago. But what would they have if they did live here today? There is hardly a fish in the water and the fisheries are so tightly controlled that there are few options. Damned if you do and damned if you don't.
Moved up the coast from Woods Island today. We had a good breeze to start with but it soon dropped to nothing only to return with a light northerly in our face. We arrived in Bonne Bay in the late afternoon and anchored in Neddy Harbor. 10 pm the fireworks started and we watched from the boat giving a shot of our cannon at the end. Nice echo.
Friday, July 2nd. Northwest wind today so we when into East Arm and anchored along the north shore. The younger 2/3rds went one way and Judy and I went the other. Both groups had great hikes and returned tired and dirty.
Back to Neddy Harbor and calmly anchored. Heading north along the coast tomorrow weather permitting.
Cheers, David, Judy, et al....
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