Allan and Rina's Sailing Adventure

The travels of S/V Follow You Follow Me Continue....

03 November 2019 | Marina La Cruz, Mx
18 October 2019 | La Cruz, Banderas Bay, Mexico
20 September 2019 | La Cruz, Mexico
14 September 2019
13 September 2019 | Nuevo Vallarta
18 July 2019 | Port Denerau
12 July 2019 | Vuda Point, Fiji
11 May 2019 | Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica
06 April 2019 | Zijuatanejo
03 April 2019 | Zihuatanejo
20 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
05 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
04 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
04 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
20 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad
20 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad
08 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad
08 February 2019 | Tenticatita Bay
07 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad

Mini Refit in La Cruz, MX

03 November 2019 | Marina La Cruz, Mx
allan
After hauling out and getting fresh bottom paint at the La Cruz Shipyard, we relocated full time from Paradise Village Marina to Marina La Cruz to be closer to some of our favorite restaurants and live music hangouts. As October progresses, more and more people are returning to their boats, cleaning off the residue of over 100" of rain and getting ready to go sailing after the hurricane season ends on November 1st. The morning cruisers net on VHF 22 has come alive, with close to 40 boats checking in now.

Unfortunately, we still had a long list of things that we wanted to get done before heading up into the Sea of Cortez for an extended off the grid passage. Here's a run-down of the jobs Rina and I have tackled over the past 3 weeks. With any luck this work will pay off with less maintenance and chores to deal with over the coming months.

(lots of pictures in the gallery)

1. Our Mastervolt genset was getting cranky at the end of last season, shutting down due to high temperature intermittently. After troubleshooting to confirm that none of the sensors were bad, we suspected the heat exchanger was becoming clogged. We have never serviced the heat exchange in 12 years, so it was the likely suspect. We took the heat exchanger back to the US with us and Marine Radiator in San Diego rebuilt it. After installation, water flow is much improved and no high temp errors.

2. We were having intermittent issues with our fridge and freezer compressors... making odd noises and not holding temperatures as they used to. After having them recharged we decided to add some additional cooling fans to the compartments under the settee seats. The keel coolers do a good job, but the compressors work much harder when the water temperature is 88 degrees.

3. While the fridge and freezer were dormant, we also took the opportunity to repaint all the internal surfaces. Looks like new!

4. Rina sewed new SUP rack arm covers with Sunbrella so the black foam does not disintegrate... and it matches the bimini no less!

5. Repaired broken seams on the stern shade cover. The sun in Mexico is brutal, even on UV thread.

6. Sewed tears in spinnaker bag from UV damage and picking it up in the wrong places.

7. Rina made new black fleece fender covers to cover up our aging grungy fenders.

8. Removed the life raft and raft rack to inspect and clear the deck for new gelcoat paint on the non-skid.

9. Repaired hairline cracks in the gelcoat toe rail - these are mostly cosmetic, but some are holes where the original layup had some voids just under the surface. We usually do gelcoat repairs every two years, fixing the top 5 ugliest cracks, just to keep the boat looking good.

10. The biggest job was laying down fresh grey gelcoat on the side decks. Over the past 16 years the decks have worn and were not as grippy underfoot as they should be. We also noticed very small hairline cracks forming some places on the deck. Antonio and his team did a great job preparing the decks and laid down 2 coats of gelcoat. No more cracks and nice and grippy again.

11. One of the biggest questions when redoing the non-skid was whether to pull the stanchions. The easy way was to tape around the stanchion legs, but it clearly was not the right way to go. Lewis gave me a role of butyl tape a couple of years ago and this was a great opportunity to pull all the stanchions, de-rust them and re-bed them correctly. I'm glad I did because they look great on top of the new gelcoat.

12. Re-Installed the genoa and preventers we took off for the summer

13. Replaced our spare halyard that had somehow gotten frayed halfway up the length. Used a needle and waxed thread to sew one to the other temporarily so we could hoist the new one up the mast and back down. Much easier than getting hauled up the mast to run it by hand.

14. Tuned up the dinghy motor. After a long summer it was running rough and we also had a blocked lube fitting so that the motor would barely turn and was clearly a safety problem. Antonio recommended a local mechanic who rebuilt the carburetor and somehow cleared the grease fitting. (I tried and failed!)

15. Our 15-year-old SSB whip antenna was looking sad, so we pulled it down to put a fresh coat of white paint on it.

16. Repainted the salon windshield shade covers.

17. Last year in La Paz we were docked at Marina Cortez when a big windstorm came through and jammed our stern swim ladder into the dock, cracking the gel coat, which proceeded to rust out over the next 8 months. Antonio repaired the cracks and we refurbed the swim step. The joys of polishing and refurbing stainless steel are hard to underestimate. (Yea, Rina was right again, I should have tied the boat further away from the dock)

18. Polished 100 gallons of diesel fuel. As much as we tried to prevent it by sealing vents and lubing the gaskets of our filler cap, water penetrated our primary fuel tank. We stalled coming off the dock quickly purged the water from our Racor 500 filters and motored from Paradise village to La Cruz, purging 2 more quarts of water through the Racor filters. UGhhh!

19. Over the course of the last year several light switches became intermittent. One of the benefits of having LOTS of time and not much of a supply chain is pulling tiny switches apart to see if they can be fixed. I batted 500, fixing one while having to scavenge a switch from an unused fixture for the other.

20. Our companionway steps are like your hallway leading from the front door. Between us and the dogs, LOTS of traffic. We pulled them apart and cleaned them with teak cleaner and put a fresh coat of teak oil on them and they look great!

21. Because our dogs are not, shall we say "smart", we have puppy nets around the bottom half of our lifelines to stop them from ending up overboard. Had to remove them when redoing the decks.... 4 hours later in the hot sun, they are back on.

22. Our cockpit folding seats were looking pretty sad. After 12 years of heavy use, the blue and red sunbrella was stained and the inner cushions had collapsed. We did a minor fix a couple of years ago, stuffing extra foam into the voids, but this time we did a full rebuild. New foam and a very cool looking new Sunbrella pattern (Silica Sesame). Rina's expert sewing skills, along with her trusty Sailrite sewing machine did the trick.

23. After pickling the Watermaker for the summer, we learned that the pickling solution tends to stick to the 3 way valves, making them freeze. Cruise RO was fantastic about replacing the valve and giving us new recommendations on how to avoid this in the future. Best of all, after disconnecting and reinstalling a bunch of water lines to the valves, there are no leaks!

24. And then we had to get ready to leave...
a. Take on 100 gallons of diesel
b. Refill the propane tanks
c. Provision food for 3-4 weeks
d. Repack stern lazarettes. Why does it feel like we always have too much to fit??
e. Dive on the hull and clean the light fuzz of algae that had grown over the past 4 weeks, inspect the prop, and most importantly the leading edge of the keel that kissed a sand bar at 4 knots as we were leaving Paradise Village. The dredge was working at the time and in hindsight we should have stayed close rather than split the channel.
f. Hoist the outboard motor and mount it on the rail.
g. Pre-make 3 days of passage meals in a hot rolly galley

Now it's time to get our sea legs back with a 50-60 hour passage up the coast.....

allan and rina

Sailors vs. Boaters

18 October 2019 | La Cruz, Banderas Bay, Mexico
allan
Nuff Said....

For the nautically challenged, a cleat hitch is a simple but effective knot for securing a line to a cleat. No amount of additional turns around a cleat will improve the holding power of this simple but effective knot.

Haulout in La Cruz Part 2

20 September 2019 | La Cruz, Mexico
allan
Peter Vargas and his team at SeaTek Yacht Services in the La Cruz Boat Yard did a fantastic job refreshing our aging bottom paint, sanding down to the gelcoat, laying down 2 coats of primer and 2.5 coats of black Amercoat ABC3 ablative bottom paint. His team also made the hull look new again, replacing scratched up striping and buffing out the boot stripe to return the faded blue to its original sheen. While not cheap, it’s still cheaper than the States and the quality is top-notch. A six pack of beer for the team now and then doesn’t hurt either.
In a couple of weeks, we head over to Marina La Cruz to get our non-skid decks refreshed and do final prep for our departure in November. We’re headed way up north in the Sea of Cortez…. But we’ll save that story for another day.

Hauling Out in La Cruz

14 September 2019
allan
As luck would have it, we were scheduled for a haul-out to repaint sv Follow You’s bottom the day before Hurricane Lorena was supposed to hit us. Generally speaking, a hauled-out boat in the yard is safer than being in the water during a hurricane but it still gave us the heeby jeebies. We rented a very nice casa a couple blocks up from the boat yard with a huge yard for the dogs to run and pool to bring our core temperatures down after mornings working on the boat.

Hurricane Lorena

13 September 2019 | Nuevo Vallarta
allan
During the entire time we were in the States, Rina and I obsessively checked the weather, looking for signs of hurricanes forming and heading up the coast. Climate Change not-withstanding, the hurricane patterns in the eastern Pacific are pretty consistent. Early in the season, they form below Mexico, head northwest and die out well offshore. As the season progresses, hurricanes tend to get closer to the Mexican coast and in late September can curl directly into the coast, dropping 10+ inches of rain in 24 hours and do significant damage.
We prepared sv Follow You for the eventuality, with extra dock lines and chafe gear, sails removed, and thru-hulls closed. We also had E2 Yacht Services, an excellent boat-sitting service, run by expert skipper Eugenie Russel, watch our boat and report to us weekly on the state of batteries and look for water intrusion. As luck would have it, no hurricanes threatened while we were away, even as rain and lightning were almost a daily occurrence.
Within a week or so of arriving back in Puerto Vallarta, Hurricane Lorena roared up the coast and threatened Puerto Vallarta. Sv Carinthia reported 85 knot winds in Barra De Navidad, so we were prepared for the worst. Luckily, Cabo Corrientes, the tall mountain guarding the south entrance to Banderas Bay, did what it almost always does, bouncing the storm back out to sea. We saw winds of 15-20 knots and rain but were not seriously threatened.

Quixotic back in the water

18 July 2019 | Port Denerau
allan
Lewis and Alyssa celebrating the now refreshed topsides on sv Quixotic

We splashed the boat on schedule and headed to Port Denerau to celebrate getting out of the hot and dirty yard. In our slip, surrounded by superyachts, we finished putting the boat back together, including a whole bunch of non-skid for the now VERY slippery decks. The last non-skid went on just as a huge rainstorm approached and I headed to the airport to fly back home. I slept all the way.

Off to Fiji!

12 July 2019 | Vuda Point, Fiji
allan
In early July while enjoying daily workouts and yoga at the Paradise Village Resort Spa (3 bucks a day for the Gym and 90 minute Yoga class!) we received a call from Lewis and Alyssa in Fiji, who proceeded to outline how they had just hauled Quixotic for a complete topsides overhaul. It seems that their charter guests were starting to drop comments about the topsides looking tired. Never ones to equivocate, Lewis and Alyssa decided to pull the boat and repaint the topsides before the charter season was to begin in a couple of weeks. Rina and I listened, shaking our heads in disbelief.... How were they going to get all that done in a couple of weeks? We never underestimate these two, however and they had a plan.... Anything that could not get done before they put back in the water would just have to wait.... It would also mean 14-hour days in the yard for them.
After ending the call, Rina and I decided that I was going to Fiji to help. We called them back and offered my assistance, which was graciously accepted. What fun! 2.5 weeks of working on boats in exotic ports!

Two days later I was headed to LAX, where during a hectic 3-hour layover I sprinted to West Marine for boat parts and Costco for 6 sets of queen sheets for the next charter season. It was quite a sight fitting the sheets in a huge duffle in the back of a Lyft as we sped back to the airport. Some 12 hours later I landed in Nadi airport and hugged my daughter. This was going to be fun!
Every day started early with a fresh breakfast by Alyssa as we went over the plan for the day. Then we headed out for errands to locate parts or other supplies and then to the boat. Alyssa and Lewis had pulled all the hardware off the topsides, some of which had not been off in 30 years. For a week and a half, I sat where you see me above, meticulously cleaning and restoring winches, clutches, turning blocks, traveler tracks and a bunch of miscellaneous stuff. For lunch we walked over to the Boatshed Restaurant in Vuda Point Marina, where my favorite dish by far was the local favorite Kokoda Salad, cold poached fish in lime juice served in fresh coconut milk.

While I toiled outside, 3-5 Fijian painters methodically fixed weak areas in the fiberglass, sanded and prepped the topsides before laying down 3 coats of base paint and 5 coats of high-quality white paint. Meanwhile Alyssa was working on refreshing several systems and some of the paint inside the boat.

Proud Parents!

11 May 2019 | Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica
allan
Megan first visited Costa Rica in 2003 while in high school, delivering wheelchairs to disadvantaged kids and fell in love with the country. Fast forward 16 years and now she's in love with Anthony Corrao. What a beautiful setting for a wedding. 40 people braved multi-connection flights and a 3-hour ride to Manuel Antonio National Park to attend a beach-side wedding under threatening skies. We had tents set up as a contingency but despite rain the days before and after, the skies cleared for 2 hours while Megan and Anthony were wedded on the beach as 7-foot waves crashed in the background.
Between the cool Manuel Antonio vibe, hikes to local waterfalls and 3 days at Tabecon Hot Springs in the northern part of the country, we have fallen in love with the country too.

Season's End is Near- Time to head North

06 April 2019 | Zijuatanejo
allan
After a little over a month in Zihuatanejo we are ready to head northwest up to Banderas Bay. When we arrived in Ztown there were 30+ sailboats in the anchorage and now we are down to about 4 as the great migration started.

Winds will be mild so it hopefully will not be much of a bash. Planning on about 40 hours at avg 5 knots to get back to Barra De Navidad for a last hurrah at the Isla Grand Marina and their wonderful pool, then we will look for a weather window to get around Cabo Corrientes and into Banderas Bay where we will be summering over at Paradise Village Marina at Nuevo Vallarta. 207 miles from Ztown to Barra and 136 further to Nuevo Vallarta.

Of course we can't leave the anchorage without one more party with Carinthia and SeaGlub tonight... this time on Follow You!

As the season comes to a close in the next month, temperatures will start to rise and peak in July-September. High humidity and 90-95 degrees with fickle wind, lots of rain and hurricane threats will keep us close to home. The boat will mostly be tucked into the Marina during hurricane season while we visit Costa Rica in May for Daughter Megan's wedding and then back to the states for a couple of months in late July. In between we hope to do some inland road trips, knock off a couple of big boat projects and prepare for next season....

Party on Carinthia!

03 April 2019 | Zihuatanejo
allan
When Rina and I cruised 10 years ago one of our best boat buddies was Dietmar and Suzanne on Carinthia. Even our meeting was epic.... new to cruising and having just arrived at the Kona Kai marina in San Diego with our Baja Haha crew of brother Philip, his wife Josie, Corey and Bernice Wurzner, we all piled into our little 9 foot dinghy with cocktails in hand and started cruising the marina at dusk. We waved to various people on their boats, with Phil and Corey tossing jokes back and forth until we found our cups were empty. Crap, I guess we need to go back for a refill... Just as we were turning the boat, we heard "Hey, do you guys need a drink?" That was the dulcet baritone of Dietmar Petutschnig on his Lagoon 440 Catamaran. We all look at each other and our empty glasses and said WTF, let's do it. Several refills later we stumbled back to our boat.

That began a long friendship that included cruising Mexico, French Polynesia, Tonga and New Zealand together over a 2 year period. After returning to work in 2010 we stayed in contact, visiting with them in Fiji and their home in Las Vegas.

As our cruising plans solidified over the past couple of years, we were always chatting with Dietmar and Suzanne wondering when our boats would be in the same anchorage again. As luck would have it, Carinthia was slowly making their way from Panama up to Mexico as we headed south to Zijuatanejo. After getting a good weather window to cross the Gulf of Tehuantepec below Acapulco, they finally arrived around noon and anchored behind us. Both Follow You and Chris and Monica on SeaGlub could barely wait for them to get their anchor down when we dinghy'd over to welcome them.

In classic Dietmar style, out came Panamanian beer and Tequila.... at noon.... after a couple of rounds we returned to our boats to sleep off the buzz only to return that night for an epic bbq dinner on Carinthia.... Just like old times.... great to be in the same anchorage with you guys again!

B-ball Zihua Style

20 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
allan
Like most small towns in Mexico, the local square is the center of community life. In Zihua’s case, they also have a basketball court, with lights and stands integrated into the square. On most nights once the heat has subsided, the court is busy with league play, with kids as young as 7-8, women’s leagues and old guy leagues. It’s all run very well and at times VERY competitive. Last night was a great example, with a back and forth game between a bunch of small-ball twenty-somethings and a much slower late-30’s team with an avg height advantage of 6”. It was like watching the late 80’s post-up style Detroit Pistons vs. today’s Golden State Warriors. The small-ball team easily outran the big guys, with endless full court passes, long bounce passes and great outside shooting.

The stands were full of multi-generational families. At one point during a very competitive game, one of the player’s grandma was having some difficulty coming down the steps. The guy with the ball looks at the ref, calls time-out and walks over the help his grandma down the steps to her seat and gives her a kiss. The ref hands the ball back to the guy who inbounds it and the game continued. Nothing like a little generational respect...

Around the court, vendors set up bouncy houses for the kids, tables with food and various other stuff for sale. While there were certainly tourists around, the focus was clearly local. On weekend nights they turn the court into a stage and hold their version of “Mexican Idol” or “the voice” with high production values and screaming crowds. Pretty amazing slice of small town culture.

Stupid Boat Tricks – Check that knot edition

15 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
allan
One of our most important pieces of anchoring gear is the flopper stopper. For us on mono-hulls, there is nothing worse than the boat rocking back and forth endlessly, especially at night when trying to get some sleep. Here in Zihua we get wind waves from the south or from the wakes of the many water taxis and fishing pangas. The flopper stopper does pretty much what the name says, stopping your boat from flopping side to side. In the few times we have not deployed it in rolly conditions, the inside of the boat rattles endlessly, with every pot, pan and plate dancing inside the cabinets.

On our last entrance to the bay after a couple of nights at Isla Ixtapa, I put the flopper stopper out and tied it to the shroud as I normally do. At least I thought I did. At 3am Rina wakes up and says "I think the flopper stopper broke" as we were dancing back and forth with the pots and pans rattling away. I usually sleep through that stuff, but not Rina. I dragged myself up on deck and sure enough it was gone. But rather than the chafed-through line I was expecting, there was no sign of it at all. There was only one reason.... My crappy knot. Over the course of 12 hours, it had slowly loosened itself and the whole contraption ended up on the bottom of the bay.

The next day I noticed that Memo, the local diver, was making the rounds to several boats to clean algae and barnacles off their hulls. I jumped in the dinghy and ran over to see if I could get him to retrieve the flopper stopper. He asked how deep, and when I said 5 meters, he said no problem.

But how was I going to convey where I thought the stopper was? My Spanish, while fine for ordering a beer or getting a check, isn't strong enough to convey where the boat was last night and where it is now. So out came my trusty powerpoint skills and a little Google translate to help get the point across. First, I showed him pictures of what he was looking for, then my best estimate of where my boat was last night in relation to where the boat currently sat. Most nights the winds come from onshore, a shift of 180 degrees from the daytime breeze.
It was clear that Memo was experienced in retrieving stuff from the bottom of the bay, even when the visibility on the bottom was about 18". I dropped an anchor from my dinghy where I thought he should start the search and he tied a red string to the anchor and let out 1 meter of line and then searched in a circle around that perimeter, searching in murky water mostly by touch. He then let out the string another meter and did the same thing. After 3 passes, and having covered a circle 6 meters in diameter, he stumbled over the stopper and brought it up to the surface. Took only about 10 minutes thanks to his methodical approach.

When I asked Memo "Quanta Questa?" he said "Trescientos". 300 pesos...That's about 15 bucks. It would cost me way more than that to replace it so I said "no, no, Que tal unos setecientos pesos?" (700 pesos) He just smiled and said "Muy Bueno!" Muy Bueno indeed, as many a sleepless night was averted thanks to Memo.

Zihua Guitarfest

05 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
allan
The Zihua Guitarfest was a blast, with several acts each day and night, including a main stage right on the beach. Eric McFadden and Omar Torrez, above, rocked the place with latin/flamenco style originals and amazing fret work.

Later in the week there was a strange disruption in the audience as a bunch of people got up from their chairs during the performance and were looking down. Was it a crocodile? They are known to prowl the estuary and creek…. What the heck was it? Luckily no…Instead of a croc it was 100’s of baby sea turtles emerging from the sand and heading for the water! While the music continued, the audience cleared the path as the little guys sprinted to the water some 30 feet away. There are several turtle sanctuaries on beaches up and down the coast nearby and this is right in the middle of hatching season. Clearly the newly hatched turtles were inspired by the high energy music to sprint for their lives on Zihua’s most popular beach. Let’s hope they dodge the mangy beach dogs when they return to lay their eggs in a couple of years.

Entering Zihuatanejo Bay

04 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
allan
For most coastal cruisers, Zihuatanejo is the furthest point South ventured. South of here the distances between good anchorages become longer and the crowd thins out unless you are heading to central America and through the Panama Canal to the Caribbean. One of the more forbidding obstacles is the Gulf of Tehuantapec, just above the border with Guatemala, regularly seeing 25-40 knot winds with the accompanying big seas for weeks at a time on the Pacific Coast.

Zihuantanejo attracts cruisers with 2 festivals; Sailfest in February and Guitarfest in March. Zihua is like a bigger, slightly more cosmopolitan Barra, with a bustling waterfront and downtown area, the Ixtapa tourist zone just to the north and a constant flow of tourists. Even better is the dinghy valet, two enterprising guys who will haul your dinghy up the beach or into the water for you and watch it for you for 10 pesos each direction.

A Dog’s Life Aboard

04 March 2019 | Zihuatanejo
allan
A common question for us is how the dogs like living aboard. Well, much like for us humans, there are compromises, but they have adapted very well. Knowing we would be sailing again someday, we purposely searched for breeds that were adaptable for life aboard. They needed to be small, short-haired and nimble. While both Teva and Leeloo are mutts, their mix of rat terrior, jack russel and chihuahua have made for a good combination.

The biggest transition for them (and us) was training them to do their business on a 2’ x 3’ piece of artificial grass located amidships. We started by putting piddle pads in the cabin to get them used to going onboard, and while that worked, they clearly liked the grass better. Within 2-3 days of being at sea, they were trained to walk up to the grass sitting under the boom and go. The grass is lined with heavy duty vinyl to capture everything and a line tied to a big rivet in the lining allows us to throw the whole thing overboard to clean it. Plus small dogs = small poop. As the pro puppy trainers tell us, success is based as much on training the humans along with training the dogs.

Yes, the dogs get a little seasick when the seas kick up, but the worst symptom is sleeping and licking their lips a lot. They are great watchdogs, regularly fending off other boats or paddle boarders who get too close to our boat. They love dinghy rides, as that usually means a trip to the beach where they can run until they are completely pooped out. While both dogs can swim just fine, they usually shy away from water unless its hot, when they overcome their anxiety to enjoy a good dip.

To make sure they *stay* on board, we installed white plastic box fencing on the lowest part of the lifelines all the way around the boat (see picture above, to the right) to make sure that Leeloo the klutz doesn’t go overboard.

We were concerned that the dogs would not get enough puppy socialization being mainly on board, but that has not been the case. There are lots of cruisers with dogs and just like the “kid boats” that do a lot of socializing together, the “dog boats” do the same. Many of the restaurants in Mexico beach towns are dog friendly, so we take them with us to dinner off the boat where they get to socialize with a bunch of off-leash Mexican dogs, who for the most part are MUCH more chill than their American counterparts.

The downside is that our travel flexibility is sometimes limited, and we dread having to put them on an airplane when we visit California in July. All in all, its worth it, as they bring us much joy and they seem to be having a good time too.

Barra De Navidad from 5000 feet

20 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad
allan
Another of our favorite cruising destinations is Barra De Navidad. This small town is off the beaten track of most North American tourists, but has a small U.S. and Canadian expat community, a thriving music scene and a strong local community. For the cruiser it offers either a safe anchorage inside the estuary "lagoon", without the ocean swell or wind waves that sometimes keep us rolling in our bunk, or a marina attached to the Isla Grande Resort, offering access to unlimited electricity, water and access to the multilevel pool with the required swim-up bar. For the dogs, there is a huge grass area just off the dock so they can get long runs and a break from their little piece of artificial grass aboard.

Picture courtesy of MLS Vallarta

The Scene in Barra De Navidad

20 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad
allan
One of the benefits of cruising slowly this year is being able to spend a long time in places we like. In our last trip to Mexico in 2009 we were 8 days offshore on our way to French Polynesia by this date. That meant we could only spend days in each anchorage rather than weeks. Barra has always been one of our favorite towns due to its laid back nature and mix of cultures and amenities. We spent a total of 6 weeks in Barra, getting a much better feel for the place.

Upper Left
Arturo and his son are one of several independent yacht services outfits at the marina. Arturo does everything from dive on your boat to clean the pesky barnacles that attach themselves to boats in these waters, to refill propane tanks, boat cleaning, polishing, painting and even picked up Rina from the Manzanillo airport. There are guys like Arturo in all the Marinas we visit. Hard working, friendly guys who make a good living on the docks.

Upper right
Fiesta night in the town square brought out all the local schools and independent dance groups to put on a traditional fiesta for the town. The event included arts and crafts sales, silent auction and food, with all proceeds going to local community organizations and schools.

Lower Left
Another sunset on the Malecon, where visitors and locals congregate nightly. The Malecon is right in the center of the picture in the prior blog entry.

Lower Right
The 3rd annual Carlos Santana Music Festival was held on the Malecon, playing to huge crowds, with proceeds going to the Tiopa Tlanextli (Sanctuary of Light) community center in Autlan, about an hour drive out of Barra. Carlos Santa was born in Autlan before moving to Tijuana when he was 8. Great bands, including a Santana tribute band with a 11-year-old drummer who had SERIOUS chops and great beat maintenance.

Joe Bellamy Visits SV Follow You

08 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad
allan
We were honored with a visit by good friend Joe Bellamy, the Bass/Keyboard player I have played with in Over the Edge, Tangled Roots, and Four for the Road. Joe flew down from Amador County to spend a week with us in Barra and Tenticatita. Joe is a well-travelled guy, but the sailing scene was completely new to him. After a couple of days visiting the scene in Barra we headed to Tenticatita where we could snorkel, swim, cruise the jungle estuary and otherwise show him the cruising life. Safe to say it was a revelation and based on his recent emails, is looking to schedule a return visit. Your welcome anytime Joe!

The Mayor of Tenticatita Bay

08 February 2019 | Tenticatita Bay
allan
Tenticatita Bay is a very special place on the gold coast of Mexico, seemingly designed just for cruisers. Every year, sailboats migrate from the Sea of Cortez, pushed by the (relative) cold of winter that brings water temperatures down to the high 60’s and cool nights into the high 50’s. They stop only when the water and air are warm again, continuing South as far as Zihuatanejo by the end of the season before being chased home before hurricane season starts in June.

Tenticatita is a couple of days sail from Puerto Vallarta and just north of Barra De Navidad. The bay offers excellent protection from north swells and is sparsely populated, resulting in crystal clear water until late in the season. Re-provisioning is a 2-hour sail to Barra De Navidad.

The long beach makes for great walks for the dogs and a daily bocce ball match. That is often followed by cerveza’s at the small beach palapa facilitating the social scene among the 20-30 sailboats that congregate here for months. The “Mayor of Tenticatita” Greg King, from SV Harmony holds court every Friday night at the Mayor’s dinghy raft-up in the corner of the anchorage. Greg throws an anchor down and everyone ties up in a big circle. Each boat brings an appetizer to share, with platters of amazing food being passed clockwise among the boats. The mayor kicks things off with an interesting question for each crew to answer…. “How did you meet?” and “most embarrassing sea story” are a few examples. The stories always get a chuckle… Often that is followed by some music by one or more of the cruisers (unfortunately I did not bring my drum) and after a couple of hours, the meeting is adjourned until the next Friday.

Another unique activity here is the “Jungle Cruise”. A mangrove-lined estuary winds its way behind the anchorage and leads to another beach about 2 miles away where there is great snorkeling in “the aquarium”… Some of the best coral and variety of fish we have seen this trip. Along the way the mangroves create a full canopy above the narrow canal, making it a little harder to spy the 8-foot crocodiles lying in wait on the shores. I’m sure Teva the boat dog looked like a tasty morsel.

Pictures in the Gallery!

07 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad
Allan
So many stories will go untold but the pictures tell a thousand words.

Click on the gallery tab above and check out the Gold Coast 2019 pictures.

Enjoy.

Lost on the Gold Coast

06 February 2019 | Barra De Navidad
Allan
Happiness is a never-ending series of good anchorages. What else can we say about the perfect conditions we have been enjoying South of Puerto Vallarta on the Mexican Gold Coast. Between Chamela Bay, Tenticatita, Barra De Navidad and a bunch of smaller anchorages in between, we have truly enjoyed our off-the-grid time.

What makes a good anchorage? A protected bay with minimal swell, a moderate surf so you can beach your dinghy without drama, clear 78 degree water for excellent snorkeling, bocce ball on the beach with fellow cruisers, a quaint beach palapa serving cold beer and fresh cocktail de cameron, long walks on the beach to wear the puppies out, good friends over for cockpit happy hour and 68 degree evenings for watching stars from the hammock on the bow.

We were thrilled to spend time with Alan and Diane Epperson from Amador County at their home in Perula on Chamela Bay. When we last visited Chamela in 2009 we missed them by a couple of days and committed ourselves to connect this time around. We joined the Eppersons and Martin and Diane Gates on a road trip to the volcano at Comala, about 2 hours in land from Manzanillo. One of our goals this trip was to get off the water more and get inland to see more of Mexico. The trip did not disappoint, with visits to small towns, great food and music, eclectic art, bird watching, coffee tasting and volcano hiking.

Sprinkle in a few two-hour sails back and forth to Barra for some marina and pool time, a super bowl party and re-provisioning and it's easy to see why people stay here for 6 months out of the year. It's that good.

Stupid Boat Tricks: "I told you so" edition

12 January 2019 | Chamela Bay
Allan
There's nothing quite like living with a person for almost 40 years...we finish each others sentences and some idea will pop into my head and 5 seconds later she suggests the same thing... She knows me better than I know myself sometimes, and more often than not, she is the voice of caution and reason while we are out sailing.

We had one of those moments on our trip from La Cruz down to Chamela Bay; while enjoying a beautiful downwind sail in 15-20 knots of balmy Mexican Riviera breeze, Rina reminded me that our two spare halyards were mounted to the bow pulpit. Sure enough I forgot to pull them back to the base of the mast prior to deploying the genoa, but caught it before fulling deploying the sail. I cleared one of the halyards and came back to the cockpit and Rina says "Are you going to clear the second one???" "No, we'll be on a port tack the entire trip, no problem!" 2 hours later as we furled in the jib with our trusty winch buddy (24V milwaukee drill with a right angle winch bit) the jib was not furling and before I new it I had blown the turning block that held the furling line. Upon further inspection, that second halyard that I was not worried about had gotten sucked up into the furling sail and fouled the normally easy process of bringing the sail in. To her credit, Rina did not rub my nose in it too much. One of these days I will learn!

On a much happier note we have enjoyed the last week in Chamela Bay, visiting with Amador County friends Diane and Alan Epperson, who own a beachfront house in Playa Perula at the north end of the Bay. The picture above was taken from their rooftop patio at sunset before a wonderful dinner.

La Cruz, MX: Musicians Heaven

06 January 2019 | Ana Banana's, La Cruz, Mexico
Allan
La Cruz Mexico, where aging expat musicians retire to play out their remaining days... Only half in jest.... the musical scene in La Cruz is vibrant, with plenty of venues to pick from every night of the week. Rina and I will pop our heads out of the boat, listen to the 3 competing bands playing in town and decide which one sounds best and then walk the quarter mile to listen. This band, average age 75, rocked the house at Ana Banana's, the local cruiser hangout, where you can get bad american cheeseburgers just like in the States! Great sound system, good lighting, an appreciative crowd and lots of cheap tequila make for a festive night out.

Another favorite hangout is Octopus's Garden, featuring an eclectic mix of touring acts from Mexico and the States. Along with the "all you can eat" ribs night, hard to beat!

We are finally leaving the dock today, headed South to Chamela Bay, Barra De Navidad and Zihuatanejo over the coming weeks. Out of Marinas and off the grid again... yippee!

Supply Chain Interruptions

04 January 2019 | Global Gas, Puerto Vallarta
Allan
Propane is central to energy use in Mexico, especially since electricity is so expensive. It is used in virtually all houses and restaurants for cooking and heating water, so when propane distribution was interrupted, all hell broke loose. Restaurants were closing or changing their menu, local produce delivery trucks that run on propane were sidelined, and god forbid, the tourist hotels pools went un-heated. Here at the Marina, they have a guy that normally picks up our small empty tanks in the morning and returns them in the afternoon. Those tanks took 2 weeks to get returned at the peak of the disruption. Over the holidays, one rumor was that the new Mexican President, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, wanted to reset propane prices to match the international market and the local distributors went on strike. Local media attributed it to maintenance at a local propane processing plant... whatever.... in our case, we heard that if you get to the local distributor at 6am, you might be one of the lucky ones to get the daily allocation. We arrived at 645am and there were already 100 people in line ahead of us. 3 hours later we had our propane, even as the line had swelled to 500 behind us. No problemo, time we have plenty of...

Happy Birthday Rina!

02 January 2019 | Coral Street in La Cruz, MX
Allan
After days of having the boat torn up with projects, we needed a nice night out and found a wonderful restaurant in La Cruz called Masala, serving Indian infused fresh mexican dishes. A great example was Rina's beet and pear salad with a raspberry vinaigrette. Presentation was excellent and Rina was in heaven, especially since it was paired with a bottle of Moet and Chandon Bubbly. Happy Birthday!

Out With The Old, In With The New

31 December 2018 | La Cruz, Banderas Bay, MX
Allan
This is how we spent our New Years Eve.... Yanking out the old exhaust hose and installing the new one. Nothing like contorting your body into un-natural positions in tiny compartments in 90% humidity and and carving up the old hose to rip it out. The 3" hose has really strong wire running through it, precipitating the use of my favorite new tool, a Milwaukee Hackzall,, to make quick work of removing the pipe in smaller sections. We were concerned that getting the new , more rigid hose in would be difficult given the many tight corners and small passages we had to navigate, but with Steve's expertise and 3 sets of hands it went pretty smoothly.

So Where Did We leave Off?

24 December 2018 | Entering Banderas Bay
Allan
When we last checked in we were leaving La Paz for our eventual crossing of the Sea of Cortez to Puerto Vallarta. Our original plan was to head for Mazatlán for Christmas and New Year's, but we were craving the warmth of Banderas Bay so decided to hop down from La Paz to Muertos and Frailes and then cross the sea over 2 days just before Christmas. Day 1 was yet again a lot of motoring, but the wind built in and we had 24 hours of glorious sailing and entered the bay at first light on Christmas eve. We were welcomed by a stunning sunrise and had our anchor down by 9am in the La Cruz anchorage and caught up on our sleep.

La Cruz is a sailor's dream, with a boat yard, fish market, chandlery, cheap taco stands and several bars that play live music till the wee hours of the night. As I write this, I can hear a local Mexican band playing classic rock covers, with a lady drummer who absolutely rocks the house on both a djembe and a full kit, to a quartet of geriatric American expats covering pink Floyd *very* well, to a traditional Mexican brass band, including a tuba player, punching out classic ranchero ballads.

The village of La Cruz is an old school cobblestone village, with a central square that is the focal point for families, tourists, full-time expats and cruisers alike. Restaurants and bars surround the square, with a wide variety of activities to take in. With a night-time temperature of 80F it's pretty sweet hanging in town just taking it all in.

One of the bummers of our crossing was confirmation that our exhaust leak was in fact NOT fixed. While the volume of water spilling into the bilge was reduced with my last repair, it became clear that our 15' of exhaust hose for the main engine was continuing to leak water into the boat. After consulting with a couple of mechanics it became clear that after 3000 hours of service, the exhaust system needed to be replaced. The good news was that the 3" exhaust hose was available locally and a local mechanic was available to help me rip out the old and install the new. Over 3 days in oppressively humid heat, we replaced the exhaust hose and (knock on wood) got our dry bilge back. Upon inspection of the removed hose it was clear that fatigue had weakened the hose throughout, creating several leaks and many leaks to come. BIG thanks to Steve Willy and his son Ely for working with me on this project.

"Along for the Ride"

08 December 2018 | Todos Santos, MX
Allan
As Adam came aboard and we asked what he wanted to do, he said he was just along for the ride and wanted to experience what we do out here... No playing tourist, no charter ride here.... We had lazy mornings, lots of down time and no itinerary. Just enough walking the beach, hiking and snorkeling to generate hunger for Rina's awesome cooking. Adam was as easy and natural a guest as we have had aboard... Today we *did* play a little tourist, hitting Todos Santos on the way to the airport and Adam got the quintessential Todos Santos t-shirt.

Come back any time Bud!

Rina heads to San Diego next week for Megan's Bridal dress shopping and brunch and I get to hang out here with the mutts doing absolutely NOTHING. We then make the 200 mile Sea of Cortez crossing to Mazatlan for Christmas and New Years Eve, hanging out at the El Cid Marina and resort for an amazing party. We will then make our way down the coast to Puerto Vallarta and the gold coast in search of that warm weather again.

Who's joining us next? [Blake]...

Jammin in the Rain

08 December 2018 | Balandra State Park
Adam
Watch Adam and I on YouTube!


After a passage through the San Lorenzo Channel which had us motoring through the nicest rain yesterday (of course it helps to be in a state-of-the-art vessel with snug fitting canvas, clear plastic window panels and big tooth heavy duty YKK zippers), the comfort of being in a rain storm and completely dry on the water is almost indescribable. Conducive to semi muted conversations, periods of just gazing out across the waters...a whale breaches in the distance. Time well spent.

The geography of the Baja Peninsula and the islands in the Sea of Cortez are quite desert like. Saguaro, cholla and prickly pear cactus so reminiscent of the environment of the Southwest where I love to backpack...the canyons of Utah and the mountains of New Mexico...each plant spaced sufficiently apart from one another so as to garner the moisture it needs for sustenance. But here, the juxtaposition of the desert islands with the lush fish and live coral is spectacular.

The barren hilltops seem to invite wandering thought...free flowing ideas, a kaleidoscope of faces, places, ideas for music and the gentle peeling back of the layers on my psyche. Getting to play guitar with Allan as he cranks out the rhythms on various instruments was pure joy. We found out just as I was leaving home that our band, Four For the Road has a booking back in the Volcano Amphitheater on August 9, 2019. Allan is planning on being back in the county for some period during summer, so we have one more concert to perform...something to look forward to. Music still matters.

As my week-long interface winds down ... floating ... just floating ... allows me to admit just how much I needed a change of scenery...per Allan's suggestion. I don't need a vacation from my life...but to access this new world for me was just what the doctor ordered nonetheless. These sensations beget more of same. Lucky for Allan and Rina that I have a return ticket to Sacramento. Saves them the trouble of having to tell me to not let the cabin door hit me in my ... er, well ... you catch my drift.
And that, ladies and gentlemen, concludes my gratitude attack du jour.

Endless Sunsets

08 December 2018 | Ensenada Grande, Isla Partida
Adam
[Sorry, but we never get tired of sunsets... even if the pics do not do them justice. While we did not get to sail much, the side benefit is full batteries and full fresh water tanks thanks to the water maker-Ed]

Leaving San Everisto, we turn south and will slowly make our way back towards La Paz. Nothing but 5-10 knot head winds heading north meant being under power the whole way. Sails were unfurled to smooth the ride, an all too common occurrence in the Sea. So...when you turn south, the winds should be at your back, right? Ha! No such luck. Out here, you are at the mercy of Mother Nature. Should she decide to grace you with favorable tail winds...you sail. Otherwise, you motor.

The four-cylinder turbo-diesel motor in this yacht requires no cranking. I mean none! Turn the key, hit the starter button and instant fire. When one has spent four and a half decades dealing with various vehicles of varying vintages, reliability and engine sizes, you can't help but be in awe of an engine that fires as readily as this one and purrs equally through chop and flat seas alike. A throw back to the Iron Age...and reassuring as hell! I am told she is stingy with fuel too. [0.86 gallons per hour to be exact! -Ed]

So with no appreciable winds, we motored to Caleta Pardita for some exploration before settling into one of the bays on Isla Pardita to spend the night. Plenty of birdlife along the way. The omnipotent gulls and pelicans are everywhere of course...the Kamikaze style of head-first fishing of these pelicans never gets old. Gives me a headache to even contemplate hitting the water at those speeds. Can't argue with nature's efficacy though. High above are vultures, soaring hawks and frigates with their improbable huge wingspans and distinctive forked tails. I was even treated to a sighting of some Blue-footed Boobies...as colorful and startling as any shorebird.

So, at age 63, another first: snorkeling. This followed a humorous 'for-the-record' recording of me doing a little demonstration of water aerobics in my 'satellite' venue. Normally taught in the pool at New York Fitness in Jackson, CA...I had purposely brought along a flotation belt and my hosts graciously provided music...appropriately, Phil Collin's "Follow You, Follow Me" for my brief workout. Will post on Facebook for the commensurate laughs.

Having never been a strong swimmer, the notion of fins, a mask and breathing tube took some getting use to. However, the rewards of viewing the underwater wonderland is what it is all about. All those years my dad kept a 55-gallon tropical fish tank is but a pittance example of the rich underwater worlds that exist. It was fitting that Allan and Rina curated my first experience. Each day a blessing, each moment something to savor...

Pulling up anchor and continuing south so as to be in striking distance of La Paz where we will return to the marina a day ahead of my departure from Cabo back home, we traveled right into the most beautiful rainstorm...big wet drops in mild mid 60 degree temps...and the rain continues here in our current anchorage of a protective bay of Puerto Balandra on the La Paz Peninsula. Canvas and plastic window panels are up. We're dry and comfortable, enjoying various activities, the checking of weather, reading, foraging and exercising my blog entry privileges...I am once again reminded...

"It's nice to have the kind of life that you don't need to take a vacation from..."
Vessel Name: Follow You Follow Me
Vessel Make/Model: H466
Hailing Port: Puerto Vallarta
Crew: Allan & Rina Alexopulos
Follow You Follow Me's Photos - Main
27 Photos
Created 3 November 2019
22 Photos
Created 6 February 2019
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Created 15 May 2016
33 Photos
Created 22 July 2010
29 Photos
Created 7 July 2010
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Created 2 June 2010
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Created 7 May 2010
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Created 28 February 2010
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Created 14 November 2009
39 Photos
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49 Photos
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51 Photos
Created 7 September 2009
Our travels to the island nation of Niue
55 Photos
Created 17 August 2009
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34 Photos
Created 7 July 2009
74 Photos
Created 26 June 2009
pics of polynesian party on the docs hosted by the megayacht crews and our arrival in Moorea
38 Photos
Created 19 June 2009
Tour of the Aquila in Papeete
31 Photos
Created 19 June 2009
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Created 19 June 2009
48 Photos
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Created 23 May 2009
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Created 23 May 2009
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Created 23 May 2009
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Created 3 May 2009
50 Photos
Created 30 April 2009
Allan, Alyssa, Dietmar and Kurt from Carinthia hike 4 miles to an old petroglyph site
34 Photos
Created 19 April 2009
10 Photos
Created 19 April 2009
Follow You crosses the Pacific Ocean to the Marquesas in 25 days
80 Photos
Created 17 April 2009
18 Photos
Created 19 March 2009
6 Photos
Created 15 March 2009
Preparing for the trip to Marquesas
12 Photos
Created 15 March 2009
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Created 20 February 2009
21 Photos
Created 14 February 2009
The very cool town on the Gold Coast of Mexico
12 Photos
Created 1 February 2009
31 Photos
Created 10 January 2009
10 Photos
Created 9 December 2008
7 Photos
Created 2 December 2008
16 Photos
Created 30 November 2008
Gunkholing the islands above La Paz
27 Photos
Created 30 November 2008
7 Photos
Created 17 November 2008
Shots in and around....
8 Photos
Created 13 November 2008
Shot's of Rich and Sheri Crowe's Farr 40
8 Photos
Created 11 November 2008
19 Photos
Created 7 November 2008
16 Photos
Created 26 October 2008
Various pics from the point we rounded Point Conception until we left Santa Barbara Channel, heading for Marina Del Ray.
18 Photos
Created 8 October 2008
6 Photos
Created 5 September 2008