Havili

Exploring the world’s oceans, coastal communities, & islands

23 March 2019 | Pacific Ocean
21 March 2019 | Pacific Ocean
17 March 2019 | Sailing Across the Pacific Ocean!
17 March 2019 | Clipperton
14 March 2019 | 20nm NNE of Clipperton Island
12 March 2019 | 160nm NNE of Clipperton Island
12 March 2019 | Enroute to Clipperton Island
10 March 2019 | Enroute to Clipperton Island
10 March 2019 | Enroute to Clipperton Island
04 March 2019 | Isla Socorro
04 March 2019 | Isla Socorro
28 February 2019 | Isla Socorro
27 February 2019 | Isla Socorro
26 February 2019 | Isla Socorro
26 February 2019 | Isla Socorro
25 February 2019 | Isla Socorro
23 February 2019 | Isla Socorro
21 February 2019 | Isla San Benedicto
21 February 2019 | Isla San Benedicto
20 February 2019 | Isla San Benedicto

ITCZ

23 March 2019 | Pacific Ocean
Nancy
Sudden rise in wind speed. Dark grey amorphous nimbostratus clouds loom overhead. For the first time, the water turns into a beautiful, deep violet. Genoa is furled up 2/3 of the way, main is double-reefed. All the hatches are closed, companionway shut. Dirty laundry is scattered throughout the cockpit. Sam, Tucker, Catherine, and I are all sitting outside...in our bathing suits. The air is filled with a mixture of tension and excitement. We're about to hit a squall, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

We entered the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) about 24 hours ago, on day 6 of the crossing. The ITCZ is an almost-continuous belt of low pressure at the earth's surface, extending around our planet in the equatorial regions. This is the rendezvous spot of the northeast trade winds and the southeast trades. When they converge, the following happen: strong ascending air currents, lots of clouds, and frequent heavy showers and thunderstorms (don't worry, we didn't get any of the latter).

Starting at around my watch (3-6am), the radar alarm went off. Sam and I were outside, and it was quiet for a while. Suddenly, in a matter of seconds, the sound of the rain stampeded towards us and roared as it poured. As soon as it came it left, and it was quiet again. The rest of the 24 hours went on similarly, with rains ranging from light sprinkles for a few seconds to downpours that lasted minutes (this was a fun one on my 3-6pm watch, I hand-steered while Sam hand-washed laundry, and we danced around and did push-ups to stay warm throughout our freshwater shower), sails being reefed and then let out again, the constant *beep beep beep* of the radar alarm going off, and watching rain clouds pass by in the distance and only sometimes hoping it would pass over us to give us reprieve from the heat/humidity.

It's now been about 36 hours in the ITCZ and it seems like we're close to breaking through the trough, with squalls becoming smaller and less frequent, and enough sun and blue skies to line-dry our freshly washed laundry.

Pacific Puddle Jump Update #1

21 March 2019 | Pacific Ocean
Sam
Here's our first entry into the daily PPJ group updates. Learning weather and other lessons from the other boats is really helpful! Still no luck fixing either of our autopilots but the self steering has improved over the past two days, so now we have more time to write updates here.

*** Havili Lat: 04 33.76 N Long: 115 14.11 W Date: 3/21/2019 Time: 21:07 UTC AWA: 105* port AWS: 8-11 kts SOG: 4.5 kts COG: 210* magnetic Barometer: 1009 mb, down from 1011 two hours ago Clouds: clear to north, large cirrostratus and cumulus over horizon to the south and east - suspect ITCZ. No rain on RADAR

All is well. Swapped out the #1 jib for our 130% genoa yesterday and the self steering is much better. Dolphins and a very large strike on dark tuna feather this morning, but no fish landed. Caught and released 3.5' long gar fish last night right after moonrise - will start taking lines in sooner. Made two huge loaves of bread last night that came out well - yeast loves this hot climate! One raisin loaf, one plain. Potato and egg salad for lunch today! Calm seas, will try to join PPJ SSB net this afternoon. We still have a few rainbow runners following along that have been with us since Clipperton!

On Our Way

17 March 2019 | Sailing Across the Pacific Ocean!
Catherine
We left Clipperton yesterday evening. It was a little sooner than expected, but the wind had switched from north easterly to east and because of the waxing moon, the current was gaining strength and pulling us closer than what felt comfortable to the decently sized waves that broke onto the reef. The windlass is still out of commition so we waited for the current to hit slack and began to carefully weigh anchor. If you've never held chain and anchor in your hand than I have to tell you, it is HEAVY. We had all broken out into a nice sweat by the end so bathing suits were in order and we each jumped in, cautiously because of how many sharks are about, and cooled off for our trip across the Pacific Ocean...Still feels weird to say that. We are back into our watch schedule, playing with self steering techniques, and thinking up good ways to pass the time! Love, Catherine

Alone

17 March 2019 | Clipperton
Tucker
Surreal is the only word I know that comes close to describing Clipperton. It was so cool sailing up to this atoll after 6 days at sea and suddenly seeing palm trees poke their tops out of the ocean. The sheer isolation is mind boggling as the nearest land is Socorro Island at over 500 miles away. The island is covered in different types of boobies and there are over a half million there in total. That means that Havili is due for a bit of a deck clean..haha. Beyond the boobies there were millions of orange crabs named aptly, Clipperton Crabs and that seemed to be about it for animal life. However the ocean had more fish than I have experienced, even blowing Socorro out of the water. There were constantly schools of Rainbow Runners (similar to Amberjacks) and Bluefin Trevally around the boat and countless whitetipped reef sharks. Sam even lost a fish he had on the line to a shark (the only thing left on the hook was the fishes head)! All in all a thoroughly wild island!

Birthday Fish

14 March 2019 | 20nm NNE of Clipperton Island
Nancy
Over the course of the five day voyage from Socorro to Clipperton, we were only able to catch two fish, on two separate days. The first day was on Tucker's birthday (three days earlier), and the second day was today (March 13), on Sam's birthday! I had planned to make a chocolate cake (with extra chocolate, as requested) right after my 12-3 watch, but was distracted by the looming storm clouds that had been creeping closer throughout my watch, and were only a couple miles away by the time I was done with my bout of hand- steering. All four of us sat in the cockpit, eagerly watching the oncoming squall and secretly hoping we would get a nice freshwater shower since its been a hot, sticky, and swimming-less passage (Catherine and I even changed into our bikinis in anticipation). The center of the squall passed ahead of us, but we did get enough rain to remember what it felt like to be cold again! After the "shower," I headed down to our room and a few minutes later, Sam was standing at our doorway, eyes crazed with excitement, holding a giant skipjack tuna in his hands! I went into the galley to see the tuna sitting in the baking pan I was going to use for the cake, and since nothing else we had was big enough to hold the fish, we decided to make birthday sushi hand rolls instead and save the cake for tomorrow when we arrive at Clipperton!
Vessel Name: Havili
Vessel Make/Model: Transpac 49
Hailing Port: Los Angeles
Crew: Sam, Nancy, Tucker, & Catherine
About: Website: https://www.havili.org/ . . Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sv_havili/ . . YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1SD89n-nm64h0AoHiFz-eQ
Home Page: https://www.havili.org/
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